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Fodor's Scotland 2001

by
ISBN13:

9780679006268

ISBN10:
0679006265
Format:
Trade Paper
Pub. Date:
12/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Fodor's

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Summary

Fodor's Scotland 2001"Fodor's guides cover culture authoritatively and rarely miss a sight or museum."- National Geographic Traveler "The king of guidebooks."- Newsweek No matter what your budget or whether it's your first trip or fifteenth, Fodor's Gold Guides get you where you want to go. Insider info that's totally up to date.Every year our local experts give you the inside track, showing you all the things to see and do -- from must-see sights to off-the-beaten-path adventures, from shopping to outdoor fun. Hundreds of hotel and restaurant choices in all price ranges-- from budget-friendly B&Bs to luxury hotels, from casual eateries to the hottest new restaurants, complete with thorough reviews showing what makes each place special. Smart Travel Tips A to Zsection helps you take care of the nitty gritty with essential local contacts and great advice -- from how to take your mountain bike with you to what to do in an emergency. Full-size, foldout mapkeeps you on course. We've compiled a helpful list of guidebooks that complementFodor's Scotland 2000. To learn more about them, just enter the title in the keyword search box. Fodor's Exploring Scotland:An information-rich cultural guide in full color.Fodor's Great Britain 2001Fodor's upCLOSE Great Britain:Designed for those who want to travel well and spend less.

Table of Contents

Destination: Scotland 5(26)
Great Itineraries 26(4)
Fodor's Choice 30(3)
Edinburgh and the Lothians
33(60)
Exploring Edinburgh and the Lothians
37(18)
Dining
55(8)
Lodging
63(5)
Nightlife and the Arts
68(3)
Outdoor Activities and Sports
71(2)
Shopping
73(2)
Side Trips from Edinburgh
75(12)
Edinburgh and the Lothians A to Z
87(6)
Glasgow
93(46)
Exploring Glasgow
96(12)
Close-Up Rediscovering Charles Rennie Mackintosh
108(1)
Dining
109(6)
Lodging
115(3)
Nightlife and the Arts
118(2)
Outdoor Activities and Sports
120(1)
Shopping
121(2)
Side Trips from Glasgow
123(10)
Glasgow A to Z
133(6)
The Borders and the Southwest
139(27)
The Borders
143(7)
Close-Up Sir Walter Scott: A Voice from the Borders
150(3)
Gallaway Highlands
153(10)
The Borders and the Southwest A to Z
163(3)
Fife and Angus
166(20)
St. Andrews and the East Neuk Villages
169(9)
Dundee and Angus
178(6)
Fife and Angus A to Z
184(2)
The Central Highlands
186(28)
Stirling
192(6)
The Trossachs and Loch Lomond
198(4)
Close-Up Hollywood Comes In for the Kilt
202(3)
Perthshire
205(7)
The Central Highlands A to Z
212(2)
Aberdeen and The Northeast
214(31)
Aberdeen, the Silver City
219(8)
Royal Deeside and Castle Country
227(7)
The Northeast
234(7)
Aberdeen and the Northeast A to Z
241(4)
Argyll and the Isles
245(21)
Around Argyll
250(5)
Arran
255(2)
Islay
257(3)
Iona and the Isle of Mull
260(3)
Argyll and the Isles A to Z
263(3)
Around the Great Glen
266(23)
Speyside and Loch Ness
272(8)
Toward the Small Isles
280(6)
Around the Great Glen A to Z
286(3)
The Northern Highlands
289(27)
The Northern Landscapes
292(9)
Skye, the Misty Island
301(6)
Outer Hebrides (Western Isles)
307(5)
The Northern Highlands A to Z
312(4)
The Northern Isles
316(14)
Around Shetland
319(4)
Around Orkney
323(4)
The Northern Isles A to Z
327(3)
Scotland: The Home of Golf
330(10)
Background and Essentials
340(44)
Portraits of Scotland
341(6)
Chronology
347(9)
Smart Travel Tips A to Z
356(28)
Index 384(16)
About Our Writers 400

Excerpts

Edinburgh

There may be no more gloriously dignified city in the world than Scotland's capital. It was outside the walls of looming Edinburgh Castle, on heights such as Castlehill that Scotland began. On these heights witches burned, in the days when faith could be ferocious. Today, the narrow walkways of the Old Town twist across this ridge, and along the area's Royal Mile you'll find splendid shopping and sprawling views that take in, among other things, Princes Street, a main drag of the New Town down below. The New Town's planned squares and classical facades make a perfect stage for buskers during summer's three-week-long Edinburgh International Festival, one of the world's great arts celebrations. Creative ferment abounds during this event, spilling over into the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the unofficial, sassy offspring of the Festival proper (and often an easier ticket). The rest of the year, Edinburgh's mini-mountain, Arthur's Seat, is an obligatory climb. And, except when the Royal Family is in residence, the Palace of Holyroodhouse is a must-see, with its fine paneling and plasterwork. Guided tours take you not only through some of the most imposing of these spaces but also down the corridors of Scottish and British history, and the story of Mary, Queen of Scots, comes stirringly alive -- intrigues, murders and all. With all the sights, museums, and shops worth frequenting by day you may want to retire early. Do so, and you'll miss the city's vibrant arts and nightlife. Sleep when you get home.

Glasgow

Warm as a pint with friends, but also bold and exuberant, Glasgow used to call itself the Second City -- not of Scotland but of the British Empire. It was a claim Glaswegians could back up. Commerce hummed and prosperity ruled through Victorian times, when the City Chambers went up, a reflection of Glasgow's self-confidence -- just before a long depression humbled the city's pride. These days the mood is upbeat again. Glasgow crackles with the energy of urban renaissance, complete with trendy stores and a thriving cultural life. George Square, at the heart of town, is a launch point for explorations that can yield surprises, such as the Art Nouveau enchantment of the Glasgow School of Art, designed by the great Charles Rennie Mackintosh while Glaswegians were still enthralled by Victorian pomp. A vibrant restaurant scene offers more surprises -- from around the world and, at the sterling Ubiquitous Chip, closer to home (try the venison haggis). With Glasgow less than an hour from Loch Lomond, Burns Country, and great golf on the Clyde Coast, it's easy to crown a day trip with a sumptuous, sophisticated dinner.

Borders and Southwest

Enter Scotland by car from England, and you enter it through the Borders. Here, England could be 500 miles away. The names of places, even of beers, are all inimitably Scottish. Sir Walter Scott, champion of Scotland, lived in the area at Abbotsford, and transformed a farmhouse into a romantic baronial mansion filled with Scottish artifacts. Here, in the pastoral reaches between the great Tweed and Teviot rivers, livestock clog the roads and seem to outnumber the occasionally kilted humans; fields are dotted by ruins such as those of roofless Jedburgh Abbey, razed by the English during Henry VIII's attempt to marry off his son to the infant Mary, Queen of Scots. In the highlands of Galloway, Scotland's southwest corner -- deeper yet into the Scottish past -- stand the remains of Threave Castle, former bastion of the Black Douglases, earls of Nithsdale and lords of Galloway. Poet Robert Burns spent theg loaming of his life in perfectly preserved Dumfries, nearby. Your deepest glimpse into the Scottish soul may come on the golf course. This part of Scotland is home to Prestwick, Royal Troon, Western Gailes, and Turnberry, hallowed names to any golfer, and hallowed ground in the land where golf was born.

Excerpted from Scotland 2001 by Fodor's Travel Publications, Inc. Staff
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.


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