CART

(0) items

Freaks, Geeks, and Cool Kids : American Teenagers, Schools, And the Culture of Consumption

by ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780415953917

ISBN10:
041595391X
Media:
Nonspecific Binding
Pub. Date:
6/21/2006
Publisher(s):
Routledge
List Price: $42.61

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$17.04

Buy Used Textbook

Usually Ships in 2-3 Business Days
$29.83

Buy New Textbook

Usually Ships in 3-5 Business Days
$41.54

eTextbook


 
Duration
Price
$47.94
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $25.84

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 6/21/2006.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

Welcome back to high school. Is it different? In some schools the pecking order hasn't changed, only the names; in others ranking is gone, but clique boundaries are even more rigid. From the lunchroom to the prom, students are obsessed with who sits together, who goes together, what people are wearing and driving. But in addition new kinds of relationships, anxieties, and conflicts have emerged. Both these old and the new features of teen culture shape our children in ways that are more fundamental than the content of the curriculum. Murray Milner revisits the most character-shaping status system we ever encounter, showing how it works and why-and how it is also shaping our entire consumer society. Freaks, Geeks, and Cool Kidsargues that the teenage behaviors that annoy adults do not arise from "hormones," bad parenting, poor teaching, or "the media," but from adolescents' lack of power over the central features of their lives: they must attend school; they have no control over thecurriculum; they can't choose who their classmates are. What teenagers do have is the power to create status systems and symbols that not only exasperate adults, but also impede learning and maturing. Ironically, parents, educators, and businesses are inadvertently major contributors to these outcomes. An absorbing journey that stirs up a mixture of nostalgia and dismay,Freaks, Geeks, and Cool Kidsshows how high school distills the worst features of American consumer society and shapes how we relate to our neighbors, partners, and coworkers. It also makes new proposals about how our schools and the lives of teenagers might be transformed.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Acknowledgments xiii
PART I: THE PUZZLE AND THE TOOLS
Introduction
3(10)
Chapter One Why Do They Behave Like That?
13(14)
Chapter Two The Tools for Understanding
27(12)
PART II: EXPLAINING TEENS' BEHAVIOR
Chapter Three Fitting In, Standing Out, and Keeping Up
39(22)
Chapter Four Steering Clear, Hanging Out, and Hooking Up
61(20)
Chapter Five Exchanges, Labels, and Put-Downs
81(18)
PART III: WHY SCHOOLS VARY
Chapter Six The Pluralistic High School
99(32)
Chapter Seven Other Kinds of Schools
131(24)
PART IV: TEEN STATUS SYSTEMS AND CONSUMERISM
Chapter Eight Creating Consumers
155(16)
Chapter Nine Consuming Life
171(10)
Chapter Ten Conclusions and Implications
181(22)
APPENDICES
Appendix I The Theory of Status Relations: Elaborations
203(14)
Appendix II Data and Methods
217(6)
Appendix III Sample Research Materials
223(16)
Notes 239(46)
Bibliography 285(14)
Index 299


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...