9780805836547

Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology: Volume Ii

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780805836547

  • ISBN10:

    0805836543

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2000-07-01
  • Publisher: Lawrence Erlbau

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Summary

This Handbook contains work by many diligent and dedicated teachers who have enriched the lives of countless students enrolled in introductory psychology. This comprehensive guide provides introductory psychology instructors with ideas and activities that can immediately be put into practice in the classroom. This volume contains 85 new articles, originally published in Teaching of Psychology (TOP), the official journal of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (Division 2 of the American Psychological Association), between 1985 and 1999. This volume consists of two main sections. Section I includes 44 articles covering a wide range of topics, such as course goals and content, student participation in large classes, team teaching, lecture alternatives, engaging and maintaining student interest, active and collaborative learning, incorporating material about diversity, improving students' writing and critical thinking skills, and using computers. Section II consists of 41 articles that feature demonstrations, class and laboratory projects, and other techniques for enhancing the teaching and learning of the key topics covered in introductory psychology: research methods and statistics, biological and developmental psychology, sensation and perception, learning, memory and cognition, psychological disorders, social psychology and personality, sex and gender, and industrial/organizational psychology. This book is an indispensable guide for anyone teaching introductory psychology.

Table of Contents

Preface
Section I. Issues and Approaches in Teaching Introductory Psychology
Structure of the Introductory Course
Improving textbook selection.
3(2)
Steven P. Chatman
Ernest T. Goetz
Introductory course content and goals.
5(9)
Benjamin Miller
Barbara F. Gentile
Approaches to the Introductory Course: Techniques
Teaching introductory psychology at a distance by two-way interactive video.
14(3)
Emir-Anne Andrews
Verena F. Gosse
Rennie S. Gaulton
Richard I. Maddigan
Personalization and active learning in the large introductory psychology class.
17(7)
Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr.
The vital role of psychology's history in introductory courses: An interview with Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr.
24(3)
C. James Goodwin
``Giving psychology away'': Some experiences teaching undergraduates practical psychology.
27(4)
Anthony F. Grasha
A rotational format for team teaching introductory psychology.
31(1)
Henry C. Morlock
William P. Gaeddert
Naomi B. McCormick
Matthew R. Merrens
Lary C. Shaffer
Taher Zandi
A method for teaching name mnemonics.
32(2)
Steven M. Smith
How I kicked the lecture habit: Inquiry teaching in psychology.
34(4)
William H. Zachry
Approaches to the Introductory Course: Content
Integrating research ethics into the introductory psychology course curriculum.
38(4)
Celia B. Fisher
Tara L. Kuther
Incorporating evolutionary theory into the teaching of psychology.
42(8)
Peter Gray
Examinations and Grading
Practice versus review exams and final exam performance.
50(4)
William R. Balch
Holistic grading of written work in introductory psychology: Reliability, validity, and efficiency.
54(3)
Robert J. Madigan
James J. Brosamer
Rating class participation: The prof/peer method.
57(2)
Kenneth B. Melvin
Study strategy portfolio: A project to enhance study skills and time management.
59(3)
Gabriele B. Sweidel
Students' Interests, Perceptions, and Motives
Student expectations of course and instructor.
62(2)
Angela H. Becker
Stephen F. Davis
Loretta Neal
Cathy A. Grover
The semantic profile technique for measuring students' impressions of psychology courses.
64(3)
William B. Davidson
William J. House
O. Joseph Harm
Motivation in the college classroom: What students tell us.
67(1)
Edmund J. Sass
Introductory psychology from the standpoint of the consumer.
68(3)
Mary Lou Zanich
David E. Grover
Enhancing Student Interest
The create-a-game exam: A method to facilitate student interest and learning.
71(2)
Joy L. Berrenberg
Ann Prosser
A method for enhancing student interest in large introductory classes.
73(2)
William Buskist
Devin Wylie
Motivating students to read journal articles.
75(3)
David M. Carkenord
Discussion Exercises and Group Activities
Consider the opposite: Opening minds through in-class debates on course-related controversies.
78(4)
Thomas Lee Budesheim
Arlene R. Lundquist
Cooperative learning and critical thinking.
82(2)
James L. Cooper
In-class collaborative learning: Practical suggestions from the teaching trenches.
84(2)
Peter J. Giordano
Elizabeth Yost Hammer
Case study pedagogy to advance critical thinking.
86(1)
Sharon A. McDade
Writing to discuss: Use of a clustering technique.
87(3)
Deborah G. Ventis
Diversity in the Introductory Classroom
Suggestions on teaching international students: Advice for psychology instructors.
90(2)
Dave S. Collingridge
On teaching about the cultural relativism of psychological constructs.
92(6)
Carolyn Zerbe Enns
Confronting heterosexism in the teaching of psychology.
98(6)
Jane M. Simoni
Infusing black psychology into the introductory psychology course.
104(9)
Lisa A. Whitten
Teaching Critical Thinking
Using riddles and interactive computer games to teach problem solving skills.
113(2)
John H. Doolittle
Engaging students' intellects: The immersion approach to critical thinking in psychology instruction.
115(7)
Peter Gray
Inquiring minds really do want to know: Using questioning to teach critical thinking.
122(4)
Alison King
Using writing to develop and assess critical thinking.
126(4)
Carole Wade
Writing to Learn, Learning to Write
Novels as case-study materials for psychology students.
130(1)
Joan C. Chrisler
Critiquing articles cited in the introductory textbook: A writing assignment.
131(3)
Karen C. Gareis
Improving the writing skills of students in introductory psychology.
134(3)
Robert Madigan
James Brosamer
The psychology portfolio: Promoting writing and critical thinking about psychology.
137(2)
Cheryl A. Richabaugh
Effective feedback on written assignments.
139(4)
Daniel B. Willingham
Computers in the Introductory Course
Psychology on a disk: Then what?
143(3)
Thomas Brothen
Developing visual displays for lecture-based courses.
146(4)
Michael A. Seaman
Developing a web-assisted class: An interview with Mark Mitchell.
150(4)
Jeanne M. Slattery
Computer-assisted instruction as a supplement to lectures in an introductory psychology class.
154(9)
Everett L. Worthington, Jr.
Josephine A. Welsh
C. Ray Archer
Erica J. Mindes
Donelson R. Forsyth
Section II. Demonstrations and Activities in Introductory Psychology
General
Invertebrates in the classroom.
163(5)
Charles I. Abramson
In-class poster sessions.
168(3)
Brian N. Baird
The science fair: A supplement to the lecture technique.
171(2)
Thomas A. Fish
Ian H. Fraser
Rap singing as an icebreaker for large classes.
173(1)
E. Rae Harcum
Integrating disability awareness into psychology courses: Applications in abnormal psychology and perception.
174(3)
Stephen A. Wurst
Karen Wolford
Combining the use of progressive writing techniques and popular movies in introductory psychology.
177(3)
Scott H. Hemenover
Jeffrey B. Caster
Ayumi Mizumoto
Research Methods and Statistics
From the laboratory to the headlines: Teaching critical evaluation of press reports of research.
180(2)
Patricia A. Connor-Greene
A sweet way to teach students about the sampling distribution of the mean.
182(3)
Jennifer L. Dyck
Nancy R. Gee
``The eye of the beholder'': A classroom demonstration of observer bias.
185(3)
Miriam D. Goldstein
J. Roy Hopkins
Michael J. Strube
A ``handy'' way to introduce research methods.
188(2)
David E. Johnson
Publication bias: A computer-assisted demonstration of excluding nonsignificant results from research interpretation.
190(4)
Todd C. Riniolo
Biopsychology
Propagation of action potentials: An active participation exercise.
194(2)
Gary Felsten
Some simple classroom experiments on cerebral lateralization.
196(3)
Ernest D. Kemble
Terri Filipi
Linda Gravlin
Classroom demonstration of behavioral effects of the split-brain operation.
199(2)
Edward J. Morris
Neural coding and synaptic transmission: Participation exercises for introductory psychology.
201(4)
Richard Reardon
Francis T. Durso
Donald A. Wilson
Developmental Psychology
``Dear Mom and Dad'': Using personal letters to enhance students' understanding of developmental issues.
205(3)
Ellen N. Junn
Using biographies of adults over 65 years of age to understand life-span developmental psychology.
208(3)
Joan M. Neysmith-Roy
Carmel L. Kleisinger
Create-a-children's game: An exercise for developmental psychology classes.
211(1)
Georgia N. Nigro
Dr. Kohlberg goes to Washington: Using congressional debates to teach moral development.
212(3)
Johnna K. Shapiro
Sensation and Perception
The garbage-can illusion as a teaching demonstration.
215(1)
Robert Cavalier
Richard Wesp
Demonstrations of color perception and the importance of contours.
216(2)
David T. Horner
A teaching demonstration involving perceived lunar size.
218(3)
Mark A. Kunkel
Learning
Classical-conditioning demonstrations for elementary and advanced courses.
221(4)
Charles I. Abramson
Tim Onstott
Shawn Edwards
Kathy Bowe
Preparing for an important event: Demonstrating the modern view of classical conditioning.
225(3)
Art Kohn
James W. Kalat
Demonstrating classical conditioning in introductory psychology: Needles do not always make balloons pop!
228(1)
Mark W. Vernoy
Memory and Cognition
Demonstrating the influence of cognition on emotion and behavior.
229(3)
Jerry L. Deffenbacher
Using a videotape clip to demonstrate the fallibility of eyewitness testimony.
232(2)
Nancy R. Gee
Jennifer L. Dyck
Memory and the Seven Dwarfs.
234(2)
Marianne Miserandino
Mnemopoly: Board games and mnemonics.
236(3)
Lawrence M. Schoen
Psychological Disorders
Exploring mental illness through a poetry-writing assignment.
239(1)
Joan C. Chrisler
The disordered monologue: A classroom demonstration of the symptoms of schizophrenia.
240(2)
Timothy M. Osberg
Social Psychology and Personality
Defining aggression: An exercise for classroom discussion.
242(2)
Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr.
The power of stereotypes: A labeling exercise.
244(2)
Susan B. Goldstein
Unveiling positions of privilege: A hands-on approach to understanding racism.
246(2)
Sandra M. Lawrence
Freudian principles in everyday life.
248(4)
Marianne Miserandino
Sex and Gender
Gender bias in leader selection.
252(2)
Michelle R. Hebl
Defining normal sexual behavior: A classroom exercise.
254(2)
Mary E. Kite
Using science fiction to teach the psychology of sex and gender.
256(1)
Hilary M. Lips
We dream, you do: ``Great'' grandmothers teach a lesson in women's changing roles.
257(3)
Elizabeth C. Vozzola
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Promoting human factors psychology thinking through design assignments.
260(2)
David M. Carkenord
Consumer behavior classroom exercises that really work.
262(4)
Allan J. Kimmel
Subject Index 266(3)
Appendix 269

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