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Helping Young Children Learn Language and Literacy,9780205342334
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Helping Young Children Learn Language and Literacy

by ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780205342334

ISBN10:
0205342337
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon

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Summary

This text is about teaching the language arts and facilitating children's reading, writing, speaking, and listening development between the ages of 2 and 5. Based on social constructivist theory, Helping Young Children Learn Language and Literacy provides realistic and direct connections between theory and practice through the use of case studies, trade secrets, and special features. The underlying principle in this text is that children are at the center of all good language and literacy teaching. This principle underlies the three themes that run through this book: a constructivist perspective on learning, respect for diversity, and instruction-based assessment.

Author Biography

Carol Vukelich is the Director of the Delaware Center for Teacher Education and Professor in the School of Education at the University of Delaware James Christie is a Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Arizona State University Billie Enz is the Associate Director of the Division of Curriculum and Instruction and Director of Professional Development and Induction Programs in the College of Education at Arizona State University

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Foundations of Language and Literacy
1(14)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
1(1)
Focus Questions
2(12)
Language and Literacy: Definitions and Interrelationships
2(1)
The Way Children Learn
3(2)
Respect for Diversity
5(2)
Assessing Children's Literacy Learning
7(1)
Teaching Language and Literacy to Young Children
8(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Provide Children with a Print-Rich Classroom Environment
8(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Demonstrate and Model Literacy Events
8(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Provide Opportunities for Children to Work and Play Together in Literacy-Enriched Environments
9(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Link Literacy and Play
10(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Encourage Children to Experiment with Emergent Forms of Reading and Writing
10(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Provide Opportunities for Children to Use Language and Literacy for Real Purpose and Audiences
11(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Read to Children Daily and Encourage Them to Read Familiar Books on Their Own
11(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Use Authentic Forms of Assessment to Find Out What Children Know and Can Do
12(1)
Knowledgeable Early Childhood Teachers Respect and Make Accommodations for Children's Developmental, Cultural, and Linguistic Diversity
13(1)
Summary
13(1)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
14(1)
Oral Language Development
15(25)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
15(1)
Focus Questions
15(24)
Perspectives on Children's Language Acquisition
16(1)
Behaviorist Perspective
16(1)
Linguistic Nativist Perspective
17(1)
Social-Interactionist Perspective
17(1)
A Neuro-Biological Perspective
18(1)
Linguistic Vocabulary Lesson
18(1)
Phonology
18(2)
Morphology
20(1)
Syntax
20(1)
Semantics
21(1)
Pragmatics
21(1)
Observing the Development of Children's Language
22(1)
A Biological View of Development
22(5)
A Social-Interactionist View of Language Development
27(3)
What Is Normal Language Development?
30(1)
Factors Contributing to Variation in Rate of Language Acquisition
31(1)
Gender Differences
31(1)
Socioeconomic Level
32(1)
Cultural Influences
32(1)
Medical Concerns
33(1)
Congenital Language Disorders
34(1)
Disfluency
34(1)
Pronunciation
34(1)
Summary
34(5)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
39(1)
Facilitating Oral Language Learning
40(26)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
40(1)
Focus Questions
40(25)
Home Talk: A Natural Context for Learning and Using Language
41(1)
Encouraging Personal Narratives
42(1)
Reading Storybooks
43(1)
Television as a Language Tool
43(1)
Time
44(1)
Choosing Programming For Young Children
44(1)
Active Viewing
44(1)
School Talk: A Structured Context for Learning and Using Language
44(1)
Language Opportunities in School
45(1)
Teacher Discourse
46(1)
Reciprocal Discussions and Conversations
47(1)
Contexts for Encouraging Language
48(1)
Group Activities
48(1)
Learning Centers
49(1)
Dramatic Play
49(4)
Language-Centered Activities
53(1)
Sharing
54(1)
Storytelling
54(1)
Language Play
55(1)
Songs and Finger Plays
56(4)
Assessment: Finding Out What Children Know and Can Do
60(4)
Summary
64(1)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
65(1)
The Beginnings of Reading and Writing
66(25)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
67(1)
Focus Questions
67(23)
Traditional Views of Literacy Development
68(1)
New Perspectives on Early Literacy
69(1)
Early Readers
69(1)
Concepts about Print
70(1)
Purpose and Functions of Print
70(1)
Graphic Awareness
71(1)
Phonemic Awareness
71(1)
Letter-Sound Relationships (Phonics)
72(1)
Conventions of Print
72(1)
Early Forms of Reading and Writing
73(1)
Emergent Writing
73(3)
Emergent Reading
76(2)
Home Literacy Experiences
78(1)
Access To Print and Books
78(1)
Adult Demonstrations of Literacy Behavior
78(1)
Supportive Adults
78(1)
Independent Engagements With Literacy
79(1)
Storybook Reading
80(1)
Case Studies
81(1)
Tiffany
81(4)
Alicia
85(3)
Summary
88(2)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
90(1)
Sharing Good Books with Young Children
91(29)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
92(1)
Focus Questions
92(26)
Making Books Accessible to Young Children
93(1)
Classroom Library Centers
94(1)
Books
94(1)
Physical Characteristics
95(2)
Classroom Lending Library
97(4)
Sharing Literature with Children
101(1)
Effective Story-Reading Techniques
101(1)
Adult Behaviors While Reading
101(1)
Child Behaviors During Reading
102(1)
Cultural Variations In Story Reading
103(1)
Classroom Read-Alouds
103(3)
Shared Book Experience
106(2)
Extending Literature
108(1)
Creative Dramatics
108(2)
Puppets
110(1)
Cooking
110(2)
Felt or Flannel Boards and Characters
112(1)
Art Projects
112(1)
Writing
113(1)
Author Study
114(1)
Assessment: Discovering What Children Know and Can Do
114(1)
How Might Teachers Structure the Day to Include Performance Sampling?
114(1)
What Book-Related Literacy Accomplishments Should Young Children Be Able to Demonstrate by the End of Kindergarten?
115(3)
Summary
118(1)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
118(2)
Building a Foundation for Literacy Learning
120(23)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
120(1)
Focus Questions
121(21)
Functional Literacy Activities
121(1)
Environmental Print
122(2)
Functional Print
124(1)
Labels
124(1)
Lists
124(1)
Directions
125(1)
Schedules
126(1)
Calendars
126(1)
Messages
126(1)
Sign-In and Sign-Up Lists
127(1)
Inventory Lists
127(1)
Linking Literacy and Play
127(3)
Literacy-Enriched Play Centers
130(2)
Preparatory Experiences
132(2)
Teacher Involvement in Play
134(2)
Shared Enactments
136(1)
Written Story To Dramatization
136(1)
Dramatization To Written Story
137(1)
Language Experience Approach or Shared Writing
137(1)
Group Experience Stories
138(2)
Individual Language Experience Stories
140(1)
Classroom Newspaper
140(1)
Summary
141(1)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
142(1)
Teaching Writing and Reading in a Balanced Literacy Program
143(23)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
144(1)
Focus Questions
144(21)
Writing Instruction
144(1)
The Context for Writing: The Writing Center
145(1)
Gather The Needed Materials
145(1)
Arrange The Materials
146(1)
Computers and Word Processing
146(1)
The Writing Workshop
146(1)
Mini-Lessons
147(1)
Writing Time
148(1)
Group Share Time
148(1)
Journals and Interactive Forms of Writing
149(1)
Journals
150(1)
Dialogue Writing
150(1)
Pen Pals
150(2)
Publishing Children's Writing
152(2)
Handwriting
154(1)
Reading/Decoding Instruction
154(1)
Phonological and Phonemic Awareness
155(2)
Alphabet Letter Recognition
157(2)
Word Recognition
159(1)
Key Words
159(1)
Word Walls
160(1)
Phonics
161(3)
Summary
164(1)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
165(1)
Ongoing Assessment and Adapting Instruction to Meet the Needs of Diverse Students
166(29)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
167(1)
Focus Questions
167(26)
Assessment: Determining What Children Know and Can Do
167(1)
What Is Important for Teachers to Know about Children's Literacy Development?
168(1)
The First Step-Gathering Information
168(1)
On-Demand Assessment
168(1)
Ongoing Assessment
169(7)
Addressing Storage Problems
176(1)
Creating a Portfolio
177(1)
What is a Portfolio?
177(1)
How Are Artifacts Selected for Inclusion?
178(1)
Who Selects the Pieces for Inclusion?
179(1)
Why Was Each Artifact Selected from the Working Portfolio for Inclusion in the Showcase Portfolio?
179(1)
How Often Should Artifacts Be Selected from the Working Portfolio for Inclusion in the Showcase Portfolio?
179(1)
Sharing the Portfolios with Others
180(1)
Special Populations
181(1)
Bilingual and Second-Language Learners
182(5)
Children with Special Needs
187(6)
Summary
193(1)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
193(2)
Organizing the Curriculum and Classroom Environment
195(24)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
196(1)
Focus Questions
196(21)
Approaches to Curriculum Design
196(1)
Subject-by-Subject
196(1)
Correlated
197(1)
Integrated
198(1)
Erasing the Seams: Designing Integrated Curricula
199(1)
Selecting a Topic
199(1)
Exactly What Topics?
199(1)
How Might The Children's Choices Be Identified?
199(1)
Determining What the Children Already Know and What They Want to Learn about the Topic
199(1)
Determining Ways to Answer Children's Questions: The Activities or Projects
200(2)
Sharing Learning With Others
202(1)
Integrating Literature Into The Study
202(1)
Learning Logs
203(1)
Assessment and Evaluation
203(1)
Involving Parents
204(1)
Implementing the Plan
204(1)
Designing the Classroom's Physical Environment to Support the Integrated Curriculum
205(1)
Carve the Large Classroom Space into Small Areas
205(1)
Gather Appropriate Resources to Support the Children's Learning
206(4)
Place Similar or Related Centers Near Each Other
210(1)
Involve the Children in Designing the Classroom
211(1)
Make Literacy Materials a Part of the Fabric of Each Center
212(1)
Create an Aesthetically Pleasing, Inviting Environment
212(1)
Organizing the Classroom's Daily Schedule: Creating a Rhythm to the Day
213(1)
What Happens during Whole-Group Times?
213(1)
What Happens during Small-Group Activity Time?
214(1)
Integrated Units Alive in a Classroom
215(1)
Summary
216(1)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
217(2)
Helping Families Facilitate Language and Literacy Development
219(30)
Before reading this chapter, think about...
220(1)
Focus Questions
220(28)
What Roles Do Families Play?
220(1)
Language Development
220(1)
Reading and Writing Acquisition
221(1)
Dilemmas Facing Modern Families
221(1)
Helping Families and Primary Caregivers Becomes Effective First Teachers
222(1)
Personal Interactions
222(1)
Home Visits
222(2)
Parent Workshops
224(2)
Phone Calls
226(1)
Parent-Teacher Conferences
227(4)
Classroom Instructional Publications
231(1)
Informal Weekly Notes
231(1)
News Flashes
231(1)
Monthly Newsletters
232(5)
Teachers and Schools as Professional Resources
237(1)
Sharing Instructional Materials and Offering Guidance
237(1)
Classroom Lending Library
237(2)
Writing Briefcase
239(1)
Book Bags
239(1)
Video Tape
240(1)
Schools as Community Resources
241(1)
Teachers as Community Contact
242(1)
VIP Program
242(1)
Business Adoption Programs
242(1)
Community Tutors
243(1)
Buddy Reading Program
243(3)
Summary
246(2)
Linking Knowledge to Practice
248(1)
Appendix A Quality Literature for Young Children 249(7)
Appendix B Literature for Hispanic Children: Preschool and Kindergarten Level 256(2)
Appendix C Caldecott Medal Books 258(2)
Appendix D Internet Resources for Children's Book Authors, Illustrators, and Storytellers 260(2)
Appendix E Childrens Literature Cited 262(3)
References 265(21)
Name Index 286(2)
Subject Index 288


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