9780415385664

Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations: Modern Egyptian Thinkers on al-damir

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780415385664

  • ISBN10:

    0415385660

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2006-11-01
  • Publisher: Routledge
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Summary

"Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations provides an insight into the notion of conscience and the impact of Christian-Muslim relations in Egypt on the works of Muslim authors. This book is essential reading for scholars with interests in Islam, cultural studies and Ethics."--BOOK JACKET.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Some notes on bibliography, abbreviations and transliteration x
PART I Introduction: horizon and focus, terms and methods
1(22)
Horizon and focus
3(6)
Interreligious studies and theology in dialogue
3(2)
Genesis, focus and organisation of the investigation
5(4)
Terms, concepts and methods
9(14)
Terms and concepts
9(6)
Clues to current debates
15(3)
Methodological perspectives
18(5)
PART II Christian conscience and Islamic ethics
23(42)
The Self and the Other in Christian and European discourses of conscience
25(14)
Some fundamental ambiguities in the notion of conscience
25(1)
Conscience in Graeco-Roman literature, and in the New Testament
25(3)
Conscience in medieval scholasticism, and in Luther
28(3)
Conscience in Early Modernity
31(3)
Critique of conscience and globalisation of the concept in the twentieth century
34(3)
Preliminary conclusion
37(2)
Islamic ethics: knowing with whom?
39(26)
Bridging `conscience' and `Islamic ethics'
39(2)
Islamic ethics as a multi-layered tradition
41(1)
Qur'anic ethics: exclusive or dialogical?
42(6)
Some notes on ethics in Hadith, fiqh and classical theology
48(5)
Philosophical ethics in Islam: universalist humanism?
53(4)
Sufi ethics and the synthesis of al-Ghazali
57(4)
Conscience, science and civilization in European Christianity and Islam
61(2)
Preliminary conclusion
63(2)
PART III Interlude: the semantics of damir
65(14)
Conscience in Arabic: the semantics of damir
67(12)
`Conscience' in modern Arabic
67(1)
Damir in classical and medieval Arabic, and in medieval/early modern Arabic dictionaries
68(3)
Damir as moral consciousness -- since when?
71(2)
Damir in biblical Arabic
73(4)
Other words and constructs for `Conscience' in modern Arabic
77(1)
Preliminary conclusion
78(1)
PART IV Al-damir in modern Egyptian Muslim authors
79(136)
The notions of al-damir and wijdan in Egyptian reformers and writers
81(9)
Introduction to Part IV
81(1)
Damir and the reception of French thought and European philosophy in Egypt
82(2)
Damir and wijdan among Egyptian reformers, ca. 1900--25
84(3)
Literary reflections of damir in modern Egyptian essays and fiction, ca. 1950--75
87(2)
Preliminary conclusion
89(1)
`Abbas Mahmud al-'Aqqad (1889--1964): ethico-religious internalisation, human conscience and Islamic apologetics
90(35)
Biographical and bibliographical introduction
90(3)
Al-damir in al-'Aqqad's `spiritual portraits'
93(14)
Conscience, democracy and Islamic authenticity
107(2)
Revelation, reason and conscience in al-'Aqqad's qur'anic philosophy
109(8)
Preliminary conclusion and outlook
117(3)
Al-'Aqqad, internalisation and authenticity -- as seen by `Uthman Amin and Hasan Hanafi
120(5)
Khalid Muhammad Khalid (1920--96): conscience, human authenticity and Islamic democracy
125(47)
Biographical and bibliographical introduction
125(4)
Secularism and European impulses
129(7)
Visions of true humanity
136(4)
Al-damir in the history of religions: a continuous quest for human authenticity
140(15)
Al-damir and the Islamic heritage: narrative, thematic and mystical approaches
155(4)
From human to Islamic authenticity?
159(5)
Preliminary conclusion and outlook
164(3)
Excursus: conscience and Islamic authenticity in Sayyid Qutb
167(5)
M. Kamil Husayn (1901--77): conscience as the law of inhibition and the voice of God
172(20)
Biographical and bibliographical introduction
172(3)
The events of Good Friday as a drama of human conscience
175(6)
Conscience as a curb and the law of inhibition
181(3)
The passive virtues of resistance, and the individual's right to say no
184(2)
Conscience as the voice of God, and one's rightly guided self
186(1)
The guidance of religion: an inclusivist view
187(1)
Preliminary conclusion and outlook
188(4)
Christians and Muslims in Egypt: united or separated by modernity?
192(18)
Modern Muslim identity in Egypt
192(4)
Christianity and Islam in modern Egypt
196(4)
Modern Coptic identity
200(7)
Late modern identity discourses among Muslims, and the notion of Islamic authenticity
207(3)
Conclusions to Part IV
210(5)
PART V Concluding discussions
215(30)
Wronging the Self, wronging the Other: conscience and ethics in modernity
217(12)
Conscience and the inward turn forwards
217(1)
The Christian--Muslim quest for self-improvement: a shared but insufficient moral concern
218(2)
Conscience, reason and emotion in the modern Self
220(1)
Being true to the Other -- guided by the golden rule, or by the ethics of closeness?
221(3)
Wronging Oneself or wronging the Other?
224(3)
Bad conscience and `the reproaching soul'
227(2)
Conscience in interreligious dialogue: telling the story of Oneself as Another
229(13)
The turn to the Other
230(2)
Islam and the religously Other
232(3)
Conscience = knowing Oneself as Another?
235(2)
Telling the story of Oneself as Another -- in diapractice
237(2)
Conscience and community
239(3)
Knowing with God: face to face with the Other?
242(3)
Notes 245(42)
Bibliography 287(16)
Arabic (and other foreign) terms 303(2)
Name index 305(3)
Subject index 308

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