9780521832229

The Human Genome Diversity Project: An Ethnography of Scientific Practice

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521832229

  • ISBN10:

    0521832225

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2005-02-21
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
  • eCampus.com Device Compatibility Matrix

    Click the device icon to install or view instructions

    Apple iOS | iPad, iPhone, iPod
    Android Devices | Android Tables & Phones OS 2.2 or higher | *Kindle Fire
    Windows 10 / 8 / 7 / Vista / XP
    Mac OS X | **iMac / Macbook
    Enjoy offline reading with these devices
    Apple Devices
    Android Devices
    Windows Devices
    Mac Devices
    iPad, iPhone, iPod
    Our reader is compatible
     
     
     
    Android 2.2 +
     
    Our reader is compatible
     
     
    Kindle Fire
     
    Our reader is compatible
     
     
    Windows
    10 / 8 / 7 / Vista / XP
     
     
    Our reader is compatible
     
    Mac
     
     
     
    Our reader is compatible
List Price: $124.00 Save up to $82.48
  • Buy New
    $120.28
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    SPECIAL ORDER: 1-2 WEEKS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The eBook copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

The Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP) was launched in 1991 by a group of population geneticists whose aim was to map genetic diversity in hundreds of human populations by tracing the similarities and differences between them. It quickly became controversial and was accused of racism and 'bad science' because of the special interest paid to sampling cell material from isolated and indigenous populations. The author spent a year carrying out participant observation in two of the laboratories involved and provides fascinating insights into daily routines and technologies used in those laboratories and also into issues of normativity, standardization and naturalisation. Drawing on debates and theoretical perspectives from across the social sciences, M'charek explores the relationship between the tools used to produce knowledge and the knowledge thus produced in a way that illuminates the HGDP but also contributes to our broader understanding of the contemporary life sciences and their social implications.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Introduction
1(20)
Technologies of population: making differences and similarities between Turkish and Dutch males
21(35)
Ten chimpanzees in a laboratory: how a human genetic marker may become a good genetic marker for typing chimpanzees
56(28)
Naturalization of a reference sequence: Anderson or the mitochondrial Eve of modern genetics
84(36)
The traffic in males and other stories on the enactment of the sexes in studies of genetic lineage
120(28)
Technologies of similarities and differences, or how to do politics with DNA
148(38)
Glossary 186(6)
References 192(16)
Index 208

Rewards Program

Write a Review