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Influence : Science and Practice,9780321011473

Influence : Science and Practice

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780321011473

ISBN10:
0321011473
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $24.80
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Summary

Influence: Science and Practice is an examination of the psychology of compliance (i.e. uncovering which factors cause a person to say "yes" to another's request) and is written in a narrative style combined with scholarly research. Cialdini combines evidence from experimental work with the techniques and strategies he gathered while working as a salesperson, fundraiser, advertiser, and other positions, inside organizations that commonly use compliance tactics to get us to say "yes." Widely used in graduate and undergraduate psychology and management classes, as well as sold to people operating successfully in the business world, the eagerly awaited revision of Influence reminds the reader of the power of persuasion. Cialdini organizes compliance techniques into six categories based on psychological principles that direct human behavior: reciprocation, consistency, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity. New Reader's Reports are included in the Fourth Edition and illustrate how readers have used one of the principles or have had a principle of influence used on them.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Introduction ix
Weapons of Influence
1(18)
Click, whirr
3(3)
Betting the Shortcut Odds
6(4)
The Profiteers
10(2)
Jujitsu
12(4)
Summary
16(1)
Study Questions
17(2)
Reciprocation: The Old Give and Take ... and Take
19(33)
How the Rule works
21(15)
The Rule Is Overpowering
22(4)
Politics
26(1)
The Not-So-Free Sample
27(3)
The Rule Enforces Uninvited Debts
30(3)
The Rule Can Trigger Unequal Exchanges
33(3)
Reciprocal Concessions
36(2)
Rejection-Then-Retreat
38(8)
Reciprocal Concessions, Perceptual Contrast, and the Watergate Mystery
40(3)
Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don't
43(1)
Here's My Blood, and Do Call Again
44(1)
The Sweet, Secret Side Effects
44(1)
Responsibility
45(1)
Satisfaction
45(1)
Defense
46(4)
Rejecting the Rule
46(1)
Smoking Out the Enemy
47(3)
Summary
50(1)
Study Questions
51(1)
Commitment and Consistency: Hobgoblins of the Mind
52(46)
Whirring Along
54(7)
The Quick Fix
55(1)
The Foolish Fortress
55(3)
Seek and Hide
58(3)
Commitment Is the Key
61(29)
Hearts and Minds
67(1)
The Magic Act
68(4)
The Public Eye
72(3)
The Effort Extra
75(5)
The Inner Choice
80(4)
Growing Legs to Stand On
84(3)
Standing Up for the Public Good
87(3)
Defense
90(5)
Stomach Signs
91(2)
Heart-of-Hearts Signs
93(2)
Summary
95(1)
Study Questions
96(2)
Social Proof: Truths Are Us
98(45)
The Principle of Social Proof
100(11)
People Power
101(3)
After the Deluge
104(7)
Cause of Death: Uncertain(ty)
111(8)
A Scientific Approach
115(2)
Devictimizing Yourself
117(2)
Monkey Me, Monkey Do
119(15)
Monkey Die
121(9)
Monkey Island
130(4)
Defense
134(6)
Sabotage
134(3)
Looking Up
137(3)
Summary
140(1)
Study Questions
141(2)
Liking: The Friendly Thief
143(35)
Making Friends to Influence People
147(1)
Why Do I Like You? Let Me List the Reasons
148(13)
Physical Attractiveness
148(2)
Similarity
150(2)
Compliments
152(2)
Contact and Cooperation
154(2)
Off to Camp
156(2)
Back to School
158(3)
Conditioning and Association
161(13)
Does the name Pavlov Ring a Bell?
167(1)
From the News and Weather to the Sports
168(6)
Defense
174(2)
Summary
176(1)
Study Questions
176(2)
Authority: Directed Deference
178(25)
The Power of Authority Pressure
180(5)
The Allures and Dangers of Blind Obedience
185(3)
Connotation Not Content
188(8)
Titles
188(5)
Clothes
193(2)
Trappings
195(1)
Defense
196(4)
Authoritative Authority
196(1)
Sly Sincerity
197(3)
Summary
200(1)
Study Questions
201(2)
Scarcity: The Rule of the Few
203(30)
Less Is Best and Loss Is Worst
204(4)
Limited Numbers
205(2)
Time Limits
207(1)
Psychological Reactance
208(10)
Adult Reactance: Love, Guns, and Suds
212(3)
Censorship
215(3)
Optimal Conditions
218(10)
New Scarcity: Costlier Cookies and Civil Conflict
219(4)
Competition for Scarce Resources: Foolish Fury
223(5)
Defense
228(3)
Summary
231(1)
Study Questions
231(2)
Instant Influence: Primitive Consent for an Automatic Age
233(8)
Primitive Automaticity
234(2)
Modern Automaticity
236(2)
Shortcuts Shall Be Sacred
238(1)
Summary
239(1)
Study Questions
240(1)
References 241(16)
Index 257

Excerpts

The initial version of Influence was designed for the popular reader, and as such, an attempt was made to write it in an engaging style. In the subsequent versions, that style is retained, but in addition, I present the research evidence for my statements, recommendations, and conclusions. Although they are dramatized and corroborated through such devices as interviews, quotes, and systematic personal observations, the conclusions of Influence are based on controlled, psychological research. This fact allows the instructor, the student, and the popular reader to feel confident that the book is not "pop" psychology but represents work that is scientifically grounded. The subsequent versions also provide new and updated material, chapter summaries, and study questions to enhance its classroom utility.A potentially attractive feature of the present version of Influence lies in its ability to serve as an enjoyable, practical, yet scientifically documented text for both students and the general reader. For students, one way to view the book, then, is to see it as a refreshing change of pace (from standard text material) that does not retreat from scientific respectability. In a related vein, for both students and the general reader, the book might be seen as a way to demonstrate that, properly presented, what often seems like dry science can actually prove to be lively, useful, and relevant to all readers' personal lives.COMMENT ON THE FOURTH EDITION OFINFLUENCE: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE It has been some time since Influence was last published. In the interim, some things have happened that deserve a place in this new edition. First, we now know more about the influence process than before. The study of persuasion, compliance, and change has advanced, and the pages that follow have been adapted to reflect that progress. In addition to an overall update of the material, I have expanded a feature that was stimulated by the responses of prior readers.This feature highlights the experiences of individuals who have read Influence, recognized how one of the principles worked on (or for) them in a particular instance, and wrote to me describing the event. Their descriptions, which appear in the "Reader's Reports" in each chapter, illustrate how easily and frequently we can fall victim to the influence process in our everyday lives.An array of people deserve and have my appreciation for their aid in making Influence possible. Several of my academic colleagues read and provided perceptive comments on the entire manuscript in its initial draft form, greatly strengthening the subsequent version. They are Gus Levine, Doug Kenrick, Art Beaman, and Mark Zanna. In addition, the first draft was read by a few family members and friends Richard and Gloria Cialdini, Bobette Gorden, and Ted Hall-who offered not only much-needed emotional support but insightful substantive commentary as well.A second, larger group provided helpful suggestions for selected chapters or groups of chapters: Todd Anderson, Sandy Braver, Catherine Chambers, Judi Cialdini, Nancy Eisenberg, Larry Ettkin, Joanne Gersten, Jeff Goldstein, Betsy Hans, Valerie Hans, Joe Hepworth, Holly Hunt, Ann Inskeep, Barry Leshowitz, Darwyn Linder, Debbie Littler, John Mowen, Igor Pavlov, Janis Posner, Trish Puryear, Marilyn Rall, John Reich, Peter Reingen, Diane Ruble, Phyllis Sensenig, Roman Sherman, and Henry Wellman.Certain people were instrumental at the beginning stages. John Staley was the first publishing professional to recognize the project's potential. Jim Sherman, Al Goethals, John Keating, Dan Wagner, Dalmas Taylor, Wendy Wood, and David Watson provided early, positive reviews that encouraged author and editors alike. My editors at Allyn and Bacon, Carolyn Merrill and Jodi Devine, were consistently congenial, helpful, and insightful. I would like to thank the following users of the third edition f


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