9780120085217

Intelligent Systems in Process Engineering, Part I: Paradigms from Product and Process Design

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  • ISBN13:

    9780120085217

  • ISBN10:

    0120085216

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1995-10-03
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
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Summary

Volumes 21 and 22 of Advances in Chemical Engineering contain ten prototypical paradigms which integrate ideas and methodologies from artificial intelligence with those from operations research, estimation andcontrol theory, and statistics. Each paradigm has been constructed around an engineering problem, e.g. product design, process design, process operations monitoring, planning, scheduling, or control. Along with the engineering problem, each paradigm advances a specific methodological theme from AI, such as: modeling languages; automation in design; symbolic and quantitative reasoning; inductive and deductive reasoning; searching spaces of discrete solutions; non-monotonic reasoning; analogical learning;empirical learning through neural networks; reasoning in time; and logic in numerical computing. Together the ten paradigms of the two volumes indicate how computers can expand the scope, type, and amount of knowledge that can be articulated and used in solving a broad range of engineering problems. Key Features * Sets the foundations for the development of computer-aided tools for solving a number of distinct engineering problems * Exposes the reader to a variety of AI techniques in automatic modeling, searching, reasoning, and learning * The product of ten-years experience in integrating AI into process engineering * Offers expanded and realistic formulations of real-world problems

Table of Contents

Contributors to Volume 21 xi
Prologue xix
Modeling Languages: Declarative and Imperative Descriptions of Chemical Reactions and Processing Systems
Christopher J. Nagel
Chonghun Han
George Stephanopoulos
Introduction
2(11)
The Five Premises of a Modeling System
3(4)
Review of Modeling Systems for Process Simulation
7(3)
Modeling Systems in Chemistry
10(3)
LCR: A Language for Chemical Reactivity
13(23)
Modeling Elements of LCR
13(13)
Semantic Relations among Modeling Elements in LCR
26(7)
Syntax of LCR
33(3)
Formal Construction of Representations for Chemicals and Reactions
36(37)
Extension of LCR's Modeling Objects
36(14)
The ``Model-Class Decomposition Digraph'' (MCDD)
50(3)
Generation and Representation of Reaction Pathways
53(5)
Creation of Contextual Reaction Models
58(6)
Case Study: Ethane Pyrolysis
64(9)
Model. LA.: A Modeling Language for Process Engineering
73(5)
Basic Modeling Elements
73(2)
Semantic Relationships
75(1)
Hierarchies of Modeling Subclasses
76(2)
Syntax
78(1)
Phenomena-Based Modeling of Processing Systems
78(16)
The ``Chemical Engineering Science'' Hierarchies of Modeling Elements
79(3)
Formal Construction of Models
82(1)
Multifaceted Modeling of Processing Systems
82(5)
Computer-Aided Implementation of Model.LA.
87(3)
References
90(4)
Automation in Design: The Conceptual Synthesis of Chemical Processing Schemes
Chonghun Han
George Stephanopoulos
James M. Douglas
Introduction
94(9)
Conceptual Design of Chemical Processing Schemes
96(2)
Issues in the Automation of Conceptual Process Design
98(5)
Hierarchical Approach to the Synthesis of Chemical Processing Schemes: A Computational Model of the Engineering Methodology
103(19)
Hierarchical Planning of the Process Design Evolution
104(3)
Goal Structures: Bridging the Gap between Design Milestones
107(10)
Design Principles of the Computational Model
117(5)
HDL: The Hierarchical Design Language
122(1)
Multifaceted Modeling of the Process Design State
123(16)
Modeling the Design Tasks
129(5)
Elements for Human-Machine Interaction
134(4)
Object-Oriented Failure Handling
138(1)
Management of Design Alternatives
138(1)
Concept Designer: The Software Implementation
139(1)
Overall Architecture
139(9)
Implementation Details
143(1)
Summary
144(1)
References
145(3)
Symbolic and Quantitative Reasoning: Design of Reaction Pathways through Recursive Satisfaction of Constraints
Michael L. Mavrovouniotis
Reaction Systems and Pathways
148(3)
Catalytic Reaction Systems
151(18)
Basic Concepts, Terminology, and Notation
151(3)
Previous Work on the Construction of Mechanisms
154(1)
Structure of the Algorithm
155(4)
Features of the Algorithm
159(1)
Examples
160(9)
Biochemical Pathways
169(14)
Features of the Pathway Synthesis Problem
173(2)
Formulation of Constraints
175(1)
Algorithm
176(3)
Examples
179(4)
Properties and Extensions of the Synthesis Algorithm
183(2)
Summary
185(3)
References
185(3)
Inductive and Deductive Reasoning: The Case of Identifying Potential Hazards in Chemical Processes
Christopher Nagel
George Stephanopoulos
Introduction
188(7)
Predictive Hazard Analysis
190(2)
Incompleteness of Conventional Hazard Analysis Methodologies
192(1)
Premises of Traditional Approaches
193(1)
Overview of Proposed Methodology
194(1)
Reaction-Based Hazards Identification
195(14)
System Foundations
196(2)
Modeling Languages and Their Role in Hazards Identification
198(7)
Generations of Reactions and Evaluation of Thermodynamic States
205(4)
Inductive Identification of Reaction-Based Hazards
209(12)
Hazards Identification Algorithm
211(3)
Properties of Reaction-Based Hazards Identification
214(3)
An Example in Reaction-Based Hazard Identification: Aniline Production
217(4)
Deductive Determination of the Causes of Hazards
221(32)
Methodological Framework
222(3)
Variables as ``Causes'' or ``Effects''
225(2)
Construction of Variable-Influence Diagrams
227(5)
Characterization of Variable-Influence Pathways
232(3)
Assessment of Hazards-Preventive Mechanisms
235(3)
Fault-Tree Construction
238(3)
An Example of Reaction-Based Hazard Identification: Reaction Quench
241(12)
Conclusion
253(5)
References
254(4)
Searching Spaces of Discrete Solutions: The Design of Molecules Possessing Desired Physical Properties
Kevin G. Joback
George Stephanopoulos
Introduction
258(9)
Brief Review of Previous Work
260(4)
General Framework for the Design of Molecules
264(3)
Automatic Synthesis of New Molecules
267(23)
The Generate-and-Test Paradigm
267(4)
The Search Algorithm
271(12)
Case Study: Automatic Design of Refrigerants
283(1)
Case Study: Automatic Design of Polymers as Packaging Materials
284(6)
Interactive Synthesis of New Molecules
290(14)
Illustration of Interactive Design
291(5)
Case Study: Interactive Design of Refrigerants
296(3)
Case Study: Interactive Design of an Extraction Solvent
299(2)
Case Study: Interactive Design of a Pharmaceutical
301(3)
The Molecule-Designer Software System
304(3)
General Description
304(1)
Interactive-Design-Relevant Sections
305(2)
Concluding Remarks
307(304)
References
309(302)
Combined Index Appears at the End of Volume 22 611(10)
Contents of Volumes in This Serial 621

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