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International Relations : The New World of International Relations,9780131174511

International Relations : The New World of International Relations

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131174511

ISBN10:
0131174517
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $104.80

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Summary

This introduction to international relations employs an exceptionally readable style that avoids jargon and abstract theory by blending basic concepts and vocabulary with a substantial amount of historical background and examples from current events. This readable style combined with new pedagogy allows readers to better understand how International Relations can and does affect their lives.Examines the many possible causes of war, ranging from human nature to aggressive states to international anarchy; Discusses the challenge of terrorism (especially the impact of 9/11 and its aftermath); Extensively covers the 2003 war and its aftermath in relation to oil and the Persian Gulf, the Soviet Union to Russian transition, Latin American and Africa, and Key figure profiles.For careers in International Relations, World Politics, and Globalization.

Table of Contents

Feature Boxes xiii
Preface xxi
Part I The Cold War Come and Gone
1(108)
Strange New World: Power and Systems in Transformation
3(20)
The European Balance-of-Power System
4(5)
The Unstable Interwar System
9(2)
The Bipolar Cold War System
11(2)
What Kind of New System?
13(5)
Are States Here to Stay?
18(1)
Is Sovereignty Slipping?
19(2)
Key Terms
21(1)
Key Web Sites
22(1)
Further Reference
22(1)
America's Changing National Interests
23(17)
Independence
23(2)
Manifest Destiny
25(3)
Imperialism
28(2)
World War I
30(1)
Isolationism
31(1)
World War II
32(1)
The Cold War
33(5)
Key Terms
38(1)
Key Web Sites
38(1)
Further Reference
38(2)
``Wrong, Terribly Wrong'': The United States and Vietnam
40(18)
The Colonized Colonialists
41(2)
The First Indochina War
43(3)
The United States and the Geneva Accords
46(2)
Kennedy's Commitment
48(2)
LBJ: Victim or Villain?
50(2)
Extrication without Humiliation
52(2)
Morality and Feasibility
54(3)
Key Terms
57(1)
Key Web Sites
57(1)
Further Reference
57(1)
Can the United States Lead the World?
58(18)
From Interventionism to Caution
59(1)
Are Americans Basically Isolationists?
60(3)
The Continuity Principle
63(3)
A Contrary Congress
66(2)
Is the Structure Defective?
68(2)
Do Bureaucracies Make Foreign Policy?
70(3)
The Unilateralist Temptation
73(1)
To Lead or Not to Lead?
74(1)
Key Terms
74(1)
Key Web Sites
75(1)
Further Reference
75(1)
From Russia to the Soviet Union
76(15)
Invasion from the West
78(2)
War and Bolshevism
80(2)
Spreading the Revolution
82(2)
Stalin's Policy Mistakes
84(2)
The Great Patriotic War
86(1)
Yalta
87(1)
The Cold War
88(2)
Key Terms
90(1)
Key Web Sites
90(1)
Further Reference
90(1)
From the Soviet Union Back to Russia
91(18)
Khrushchev and the Loss of China
91(1)
Restive East Europe
92(2)
Khrushchev and the Cuban Missiles
94(2)
Brezhnev and Detente
96(1)
Afghanistan: A Soviet Vietnam
97(2)
Why the Soviet Collapse?
99(1)
Gorbachev and Collapse
100(2)
Is Foreign Policy Generated Internally or Externally?
102(2)
Restoring Russian Power
104(3)
Key Terms
107(1)
Key Web Sites
107(1)
Further Reference
108(1)
Part II The Global South
109(86)
South Africa and the End of Colonialism
111(13)
The Colonial Mentality
113(3)
The Wind of Change
116(3)
Reform instead of Revolution
119(1)
God Save Africa
120(2)
Key Terms
122(1)
Key Web Sites
123(1)
Further Reference
123(1)
Eternal Warfare in the Holy Land?
124(17)
The Making of Jewish Nationalism
124(2)
The Making of Arab Nationalism
126(2)
World War I and the Mandate
128(3)
The 1948 War
131(1)
The 1956 War
131(1)
The Six-Day War
132(3)
The 1973 War
135(1)
The Rise of Palestinian Nationalism
135(2)
The 1982 War
137(1)
Is There Hope?
137(2)
Lessons of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
139(1)
Key Terms
140(1)
Key Web Sites
140(1)
Further Reference
140(1)
Oil and Turmoil: The Persian Gulf
141(17)
Irascible Iran
142(5)
The First Gulf War
147(2)
The Second Gulf War
149(3)
The Third Gulf War
152(2)
Could Arabia Go the Way of Iran?
154(2)
Lessons of Three Gulf Wars
156(1)
Key Terms
156(1)
Key Web Sites
156(1)
Further Reference
157(1)
The Troubled Americas: Our Neglected South
158(18)
Spain Colonizes the New World
160(1)
Economic Dependency
161(2)
Central America and the Caribbean
163(1)
The Pattern of U.S. Intervention
164(4)
Cuba Leaves the U.S. Sphere
168(2)
Mexico: Drugs and Democracy
170(2)
What Can We Do?
172(2)
Key Terms
174(1)
Key Web Sites
174(1)
Further Reference
175(1)
Economic Development: The Rich and the Poor
176(19)
The Roots of Poverty
177(3)
Why Did the West Rise?
180(4)
The Population Explosion
184(2)
The Great Migration
186(3)
Socialist versus Market Paths
189(1)
Can Capitalism Uplift the Global South?
190(3)
Key Terms
193(1)
Key Web Sites
193(1)
Further Reference
193(2)
Part III The Eternal Threats
195(58)
Why Wars?
196(14)
Micro Theories of War
196(3)
State-Level Theories of War
199(2)
Macro Theories of War
201(1)
Power Asymmetries
202(1)
Misperception
203(4)
The Power Dilemma
207(1)
The Danger of Analogies
208(1)
Key Terms
209(1)
Key Web Sites
209(1)
Further Reference
209(1)
National Security: How States Protect Themselves
210(14)
Technology and Security
212(1)
Defense
213(2)
Deterrence
215(3)
Detente Diplomacy
218(3)
Disarmament
221(1)
A Combination
222(1)
Key Terms
222(1)
Key Web Sites
223(1)
Further Reference
223(1)
The Dangers of Nuclear Proliferation
224(16)
Weapon of War
225(1)
Nuclear Deterrence
226(3)
Alliance Building
229(1)
International Prestige
229(1)
Deterrence Reconsidered
230(1)
Nuclear Proliferation
230(1)
Arms Control
231(2)
The Nuclear Proliferators
233(2)
What Would Happen If Nukes Were Used?
235(1)
Nuclear Doom?
236(2)
Key Terms
238(1)
Key Web Sites
239(1)
Further Reference
239(1)
The Challenge of Terrorism
240(13)
The Middle East Past
243(2)
How to Modernize the Middle East
245(2)
Which Way for U.S. Policy?
247(4)
Lessons of Terror
251(1)
Key Terms
251(1)
Key Web Sites
252(1)
Further Reference
252(1)
Part IV The Economic Blocs
253(50)
Europe Divorces America
254(17)
The Horrors of Ex-Yugoslavia
256(3)
The Crumbling of NATO
259(2)
Europe Gropes for Unity
261(4)
Europe on Its Own?
265(2)
The Challenge of Trade Blocs
267(2)
Key Terms
269(1)
Key Web Sites
270(1)
Further Reference
270(1)
Asia: China as Number One
271(18)
A History of Exaggerations
274(1)
Which Way for China?
275(1)
Japan Encounters the West
276(2)
The Road to Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima
278(3)
From Rubble to Riches
281(2)
What Went Wrong?
283(4)
Key Terms
287(1)
Key Web Sites
287(1)
Further Reference
287(2)
The United States and Globalization
289(14)
What Is a Dollar Worth?
289(3)
The Biggest Debtor
292(3)
Globalization and Its Enemies
295(3)
The Coming of NAFTA
298(2)
Trade Wars?
300(2)
Key Terms
302(1)
Key Web Sites
302(1)
Further Reference
302(1)
Part V The Politics of a New World
303(63)
Diplomacy
304(15)
The Rise and Decline of Diplomacy
305(3)
The Uses of an Anachronism
308(1)
Diplomats
309(2)
Inside an Embassy
311(3)
Diplomacy and War
314(4)
Key Terms
318(1)
Key Web Sites
318(1)
Further Reference
318(1)
International Law
319(16)
Consistency and Reciprocity
320(2)
Origins of International Law
322(1)
Commands
323(2)
Sanctions
325(2)
Self-Help
327(2)
Recognition
329(1)
IL and Individuals
330(1)
Territory
330(2)
War
332(1)
The Future of IL
332(1)
Key Terms
333(1)
Key Web Sites
333(1)
Further Reference
334(1)
The United Nations
335(17)
Theory of World Government
335(1)
The Short, Sad League of Nations
336(4)
The Rise of the UN
340(2)
The UN: Early Idealism
342(1)
Disillusion with the UN
343(2)
The Uses of the UN
345(2)
The Functionalist Dream
347(2)
The UN: Humankind's Last, Best Hope?
349(1)
Key Terms
350(1)
Key Web Sites
350(1)
Further Reference
351(1)
Giving Peace a Chance
352(14)
War as an Instrument of Policy
352(1)
The Future of War
353(3)
Peace Operations
356(1)
Preventive Diplomacy
357(1)
Peacemaking
357(1)
Peacekeeping
358(3)
Peace Enforcement
361(2)
Peace Building
363(1)
Beyond War?
364(1)
Key Terms
364(1)
Key Web Sites
365(1)
Further Reference
365(1)
Index 366

Excerpts

Most young people now enter college with little or no background in twentieth-century history. Ask students questions about its major events and you are likely to face silence. It is all news to them. But they cannot be blamed; they don't know it because they have never been taught. Accordingly, we take it as our task to do considerable backfilling in recent history, which we arrange largely by geographic area and use to illustrate one or more concepts of international relations. Many instructors have thanked us for this approach. Some new texts in international relations pay relatively little attention to history, leaping instead into the future. These are the "world-order" texts that, we think, implicitly argue the following: "The twentieth century was a horrible century that showed the worst that humans can do to each other. But it was only an episode in the maturation of humankind and has little to teach us. The twenty-first century, a time of global cooperation, ecology, and equality, is upon us. We must concentrate on it and not on the unhappy past." We find "world-order" approaches unjustified, or at least grossly premature. The world became more complex after the Cold War, which kept numerous problems suppressed or frozen. And the mechanisms to deal with these problems still depend on sovereign nations deciding if and when they want to participate. When people are determined to fight for what they believe is justly theirs, UN "peacekeeping" forces are useless. War--"contending by force," in Grotius's classic words--remains a part of international relations and cannot be wished away. Although we admit in the concluding chapter that war is losing its effectiveness in settling disputes, conflict is still the "stuff" of international politics. If world order does break out, rest assured we will be among the first to write a textbook on it. We begin in Chapter I with system change and an overview of the international systems that have marked modern history. The post-Cold War system still defies easy characterization.Multipolaris perhaps too general a term; we considerstratified, globalized, clash of civilizations,and other models, most of them with major economic components. The chapter also introduces the concepts of power, state, and sovereignty, which we believe are still fundamental to international relations. System change has touched almost everything in international affairs, not just the obvious--the end of Cold War bipolarity between the superpowers. Unfortunately, the changes have been hard to anticipate and sometimes have led to increased violence. In the Persian Gulf, a tyrannical ruler strove to expand his realm because his previous superpower patron could no longer restrain him. Economic relations among the major industrial blocs--Europe, the Pacific Rim, America--have grown testier; fear of the Soviets no longer holds them together under a U.S. strategic umbrella. Proliferation of nuclear weapons, a minor issue during the Cold War, has become a major issue. The United Nations, previously little more than a talk shop, has developed as a crisis stabilizer. We discuss these and other spinoffs of system change in this book. We believe that, because system change is occurring before our very eyes, IR is more exciting and relevant than ever. In this new world there are new threats to guard against and new opportunities to take advantage of. As in earlier editions, we are trying to awaken newcomers to the field to its fascinating and sometimes dramatic qualities, as well as acquaint them with its basic concepts and vocabulary. Toward this end we include feature boxes titled "Concepts" and "Classic Thought," as well as "Economics," "Turning Point," "Diplomacy," and "Geography" boxes. We also include "Reflections" boxes, which recall our personal experiences or ponder issues that affect students personally, to show that IR is not a


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