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Introduction to Emergency Management,9780750679619
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Introduction to Emergency Management

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780750679619

ISBN10:
0750679611
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
10/13/2005
Publisher(s):
Elsevier Science
List Price: $71.95

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Summary

Introduction to Emergency Management, Second Edition provides a comprehensive foundation to understanding the background, components, and systems involved in the management of disasters and other emergencies. The book details current practices, strategies, and the key players involved in emergency management both within the United States and around the world. No discussion of emergency management in the United States would be complete without addressing the significant changes that have occurred as a result of the Septembers 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks. Consideration of this issue is applied to all chapters of this edition. A full chapter is dedicated entirely to discussing the emerging terrorist threat and the resulting implications to the U.S. emergency management systems. With the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and its subsequent absorption of FEMA and 21 other federal agencies, the need for a collective resource has never been so vital.

Author Biography

Jane A. Bullock and George D. Haddow currently serve as Adjunct Professors at the Institute for Crisis, Diaster, and Risk Management at The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Introduction xi
Acknowledgments xv
The Historical Context of Emergency Management
1(18)
Introduction
1(1)
Early History: 1800--1950
2(1)
The Cold War and the Rise of Civil Defense: 1950s
2(1)
Natural Disasters Bring Changes to Emergency Management: 1960s
3(2)
The Call for a National Focus on Emergency Management: 1970s
5(2)
Civil Defense Reappears as Nuclear Attack Planning: 1980s
7(2)
An Agency in Trouble: 1989--1992
9(1)
The Witt Revolution: 1993--2001
10(3)
Terrorism Becomes Major Focus: 2001
13(4)
The Future: 2005 and Beyond
17(2)
Natural and Technological Hazards and Risk Assessment
19(38)
Introduction
19(1)
Natural Hazards
19(23)
Technological Hazards
42(11)
Risk Assessment
53(2)
Technology
55(1)
Conclusion
55(2)
The Disciplines of Emergency Management: Mitigation
57(20)
Introduction
57(1)
Tools for Mitigation
58(5)
Impediments to Mitigation
63(1)
Federal Mitigation Programs
64(4)
Conclusion
68(1)
Case Studies
69(8)
The Disciplines of Emergency Management: Response
77(54)
Introduction
77(1)
Local Response
78(6)
State Response
84(2)
Volunteer Group Response
86(2)
Incident Command System
88(3)
The Federal Response
91(30)
Communications among Responding Agencies
121(3)
Conclusion
124(1)
Case Studies
124(7)
The Disciplines of Emergency Management: Recovery
131(26)
Introduction
131(2)
The National Response Plan for Disaster Recovery Operations
133(2)
FEMA's Individual Assistance Recovery Programs
135(5)
FEMA's Public Assistance Grant Programs
140(1)
Other Federal Agency Disaster Recovery Funding
141(4)
National Voluntary Relief Organizations
145(1)
Recovery Planning Tools
146(1)
Conclusion
147(1)
Case Studies
147(10)
The Disciplines of Emergency Management: Preparedness
157(38)
Introduction
157(1)
Preparedness: The Building Block
158(1)
Mitigation versus Preparedness
158(1)
A Systems Approach: The Preparedness Cycle
159(3)
Preparedness Programs
162(3)
Education and Training Programs
165(6)
Exercises
171(7)
Business Continuity Planning and Emergency Management
178(1)
Conclusion
179(1)
Case Studies
180(15)
The Disciplines of Emergency Management: Communications
195(24)
Introduction
195(1)
Mission
195(1)
Assumptions
196(3)
Audiences/Customers
199(1)
Crisis Communications: Response and Recovery
199(3)
Communicating Preparedness and Mitigation Messages
202(1)
Case Study: Project Impact
203(4)
Case Study: Risk Communication---Parkfield, California
207(1)
Working with the Media
207(4)
Communications Means/Products
211(5)
Case Study: Federal Government Communications during Anthrax Crisis
216(1)
Conclusion
217(2)
International Disaster Management
219(36)
Introduction
219(1)
Disasters in Developing Nations
219(1)
International Involvement
220(1)
Important Issues Influencing the Response Process
221(1)
The United Nations System
222(8)
Nongovernmental Organizations
230(5)
Assistance Provided by the U.S. Government
235(4)
The International Financial Institutions
239(3)
Conclusion
242(1)
Case Study: The Gujurat, India Earthquake
243(12)
Emergency Management and the New Terrorist Threat
255(72)
Introduction
255(1)
Changes in Emergency Management and the War on Terrorism
255(3)
Summary of September 11 Events
258(6)
First Responder Evaluation
264(7)
Federal Government Terrorism Activity
271(37)
State Government Terrorism Activity
308(2)
Local Government Terrorism Activities
310(9)
Conclusion
319(1)
Case Study: ``Redefining Readiness: Terrorism Planning through the Eyes of the Public''
319(8)
The Future of Emergency Management
327(10)
Introduction
327(1)
Organizational Changes
327(1)
What Does This Mean for Emergency Management?
328(1)
What Is the Future of Emergency Management?
329(3)
Balancing Homeland and Security and Natural Disaster Management
332(1)
Public Involvement in Preparedness Planning
333(1)
Partnering with the Business Community
333(1)
Prioritizing Resource Allocations
334(1)
Organization of the Nation's Emergency Management System
334(1)
A New Path for Emergency Management
335(1)
Conclusion
336(1)
Appendix A: Acronyms 337(6)
Appendix B: Emergency Management Web Sites 343(3)
Appendix C: Emergency Management Agency Addresses 346(22)
Appendix D: Ready.gov Citizen Preparedness Recommendations 368(9)
Appendix E: A Day in the Life of Homeland Security 377(4)
References 381(4)
About the Authors 385(2)
Index 387


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