9780470842577

An Introductory Guide to Disease Mapping

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780470842577

  • ISBN10:

    0470842571

  • Edition: 11th
  • Format: eBook
  • Copyright: 2002-02-27
  • Publisher: WILEY

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $207.99 Save up to $20.80
  • Rent Book $187.19
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

This superb introductory guide explains the basic principles underlying the construction and analysis of disease maps. Growing public awareness of environmental hazards has increased the demand for investigations into the geographical distribution of disease and as data resulting from studies is not always straightforward to interpret, there has been a need for an accessible, clearly written introduction to the subject. This book supplies the reader with an array of tools and skills so that maps may be produced and correctly interpreted, and also describes the role of disease mapping within epidemiology, highlighting its important role in studies of environmental health and environmental epidemiology. It provides: An introduction to new developments in disease mapping Comprehensive coverage of an active area of research and development Numerous case studies to highlight the application of the techniques discussed This text will be invaluable to anyone with an interest in disease mapping, and is an essential volume for both the specialist and the non-specialist. It is of particular relevance to epidemiologists, medical statisticians, geographers, and public health advisors, as well as environmental health workers, occupational health physicians, and infectious disease specialists.

Author Biography

Andrew B. Lawson University of Aberdeen, UK
Fiona L. R. Williams University of Dundee, UK

Table of Contents

Introduction
1(15)
Aims and objectives of the book
1(1)
What is disease mapping?
1(3)
The environment, disease and disease mapping: an historical overview
4(2)
Disease mapping
6(3)
Disease mapping: modern developments
9(3)
Disease atlases
10(2)
The value of mapping: summary
12(1)
Summary
13(1)
References
14(2)
Visual Perception and Map Construction
16(12)
How to construct a map
16(2)
The data
16(1)
The area
17(1)
The choice of scale
17(1)
Map transformations
18(1)
Symobolic representation
19(5)
Symbols
19(1)
Contours
20(2)
Colour
22(2)
Further processing of data
24(1)
Interpretation of maps
25(1)
References
26(1)
Summary
27(1)
Data Types and Sources
28(13)
Routinely published statistics: numerator data
28(4)
National statistics of mortality
28(2)
National statistics of morbidity
30(1)
Ad hoc publications
31(1)
Routinely published statistics: denominator data
32(2)
National population and vital statistics
32(1)
Census data
32(1)
Small area statistics
32(2)
Specialist databases
34(3)
Ad hoc data
34(1)
R-cade
35(2)
Data quality
37(1)
Linking data
37(1)
Confidentiality
38(1)
The Data Protection Act
38(1)
Summary
39(1)
References
39(2)
Basic Methods
41(12)
Standardization of rates
41(1)
Expected rates
42(1)
Control rates
42(1)
The use of deprivation indices and other covariates
43(2)
Standardized mortality/morbidity ratios
45(4)
Death certificates
45(1)
Standard population
46(1)
International classification of disease (ICD)
47(1)
The tenth ICD revision
48(1)
Maps of variability
49(1)
Edge effects
50(1)
Unobserved effects
50(1)
Summary
51(1)
References
52(1)
Study Design
53(24)
Overview
53(1)
Disease mapping
54(1)
Ecological studies
54(1)
Studies of disease clustering
55(1)
Putative sources of hazard
55(10)
Identification of the study area
56(1)
Prevailing wind direction
56(2)
Umbrella effect
58(1)
Topography
58(1)
Time scale
59(1)
Diseases to be monitored
59(1)
Changes in disease notification
60(1)
Type of study
60(1)
Criteria for causation
61(3)
Choice of control disease
64(1)
Choice of control population
64(1)
A possible template
65(3)
Initial response: collecting information
65(1)
Develop the hypothesis
66(1)
Decide on the diseases to monitor
66(1)
Define the population at risk
66(1)
Describe the rates of disease
66(1)
Mapping the disease distribution
67(1)
Analytical stage
67(1)
Worked example
68(6)
The Arbroath Multiple Disease Study
68(1)
Initial response/background
68(1)
Hypothesis
68(1)
Selection of diseases to monitor
69(1)
Indentification of the population at risk
69(1)
Rates of disease
69(1)
Mapping the distribution of disease
70(1)
Results
70(4)
Summary
74(1)
References
75(2)
Advanced Methods
77(25)
Smoothing of rates and density estimation
77(4)
Ecological analysis
81(2)
Putative sources of health hazard
83(1)
Models for individual events
84(3)
Estimation
87(1)
Hypothesis tests
87(2)
Models for count data
89(1)
Estimation
90(1)
Hypothesis tests
91(1)
Disease clustering
91(1)
Definition of clusters and clustering
92(2)
Modelling issues
94(1)
Hypothesis tests for clustering
95(3)
Summary
98(1)
References
98(4)
Public Health Surveillance and Mapping
102(19)
Proactive and reactive monitoring
102(6)
The role of disease mapping in Health Boards
102(5)
Routine monitoring: advantages and disadvantages
107(1)
Mapping differences in rates
108(5)
Mapping and interpreting ecological analyses
113(2)
Malaria and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: an ecological study
113(2)
Mapping clusters of disease cases
115(4)
Cluster studies
115(1)
Putative health hazard example
116(1)
Large-scale cluster example
117(2)
References
119
Summary
118(3)
Appendix: Software for Disease Mapping
121(5)
Spatial statistical tools
121(2)
Geographical Information Systems
123(1)
Software availability and web sites
124(1)
Dismapwin
124(1)
Splancs
124(1)
Bugs and Beam
124(1)
MlnWin
124(1)
Satscan
124(1)
Stat!, Gamma, Gbas, Spacestat, Gs and Geomed
124(1)
MapInfo
124(1)
ArcView
125(1)
References
125(1)
Glossary 126(2)
Index 128

Rewards Program

Write a Review