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Inventors of Ideas : Introduction to Western Political Philosophy,9780534612634
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Inventors of Ideas : Introduction to Western Political Philosophy

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780534612634

ISBN10:
0534612636
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/28/2003
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $160.66

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This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 3/28/2003.
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    Inventors of Ideas : Introduction to Western Political Philosophy




Summary

A concise yet comprehensive introduction to the Western political thought from the Ancient Greeks to the 21st century, INVENTORS OF IDEAS connects major thinkers' political and societal views to a larger understanding of current politics. Covering the traditional canon of writers while also reflecting a concern or emphasis upon the role of gender and science in western political thought, the book gives students practical and historical foundations with which to look at contemporary social and political issues.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
About the Authors xxi
Political Philosophy: Introducing the Challenge
1(18)
Introduction
1(1)
Origins of Western Political Thought
2(1)
Common Treatment, Diverse Results
3(2)
Comparing Political Philosophers
5(3)
The Individual and the Collective
8(1)
Family and Gender Roles
9(2)
Comparison of Roles and Natures of Men and Women
9(1)
Role of the Family in Political Thinking
10(1)
Development of Political Philosophy over Time
11(1)
Techniques for Reconciling Conflict between Beliefs
12(2)
Descriptive and Prescriptive Statements
12(1)
Concept Clarification
13(1)
Conclusion
14(2)
Notes
16(1)
Additional Readings
17(2)
Part One ANCIENT POLITICAL THOUGHT
The Playwrights of Athens: Sophocles and Aristophanes
19(15)
Introduction
19(2)
Antigone
21(6)
Lysistrata
27(4)
Conclusion
31(1)
Notes
32(1)
Additional Readings
33(1)
Plato: Advocating Justice
34(14)
Introduction
34(2)
Plato's Method
36(2)
Knowledge and Justice
38(1)
Human Nature
38(1)
The Ideal State
39(4)
The Need for Specialization
39(1)
Class Structure and Functions
40(2)
Education and Censorship
42(1)
The Role of Women
43(1)
Inevitable Decline of the Ideal State
43(1)
Conclusion
44(1)
Notes
45(2)
Additional Readings
47(1)
Aristotle: Endorsing Community
48(14)
Introduction
48(1)
Aristotle's Method
49(1)
Happiness, Values, and Human Nature
49(1)
Political Economy
50(1)
Community
51(3)
Household, Wife, Woman, and Slave
52(1)
Village
53(1)
Polis
53(1)
Political Form of the Polis
54(3)
Political Change
57(1)
Conclusion
58(2)
Notes
60(1)
Additional Readings
61(1)
Cicero and Roman Political Thought: The Transformation of the Political
62(12)
Introduction
62(1)
Stoicism
63(1)
Differences between Greek and Roman Political Thought
64(2)
Cicero
66(5)
The Commonwealth
67(1)
Law and Justice
68(1)
Public and Private Virtues
69(2)
Conclusion
71(1)
Notes
71(2)
Additional Readings
73(1)
Part Two MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THOUGHT
Paul and Augustine: Emergence of the Christian Political World
74(15)
Introduction
74(1)
Human Nature and Christian Equality
75(1)
Rome and Christianity
76(1)
St. Augustine and Transformation of Christian Politics
77(5)
Adam, Eve, and Human Nature
78(1)
Government and Political Order: Emergence of the Two Cities
79(1)
Human Nature, History, and the True Republic
80(2)
Implications of the Doctrine of the Two Cities
82(1)
Faith versus Reason
82(1)
Women, Family, and Sexual Desire
83(2)
Conclusion
85(1)
Notes
86(1)
Additional Readings
87(2)
The Contribution of Islam: John of Salisbury, Thomas Aquinas, and the Rise of the Medieval Political World
89(15)
Introduction
89(2)
Aristotle and the Arabic World
91(2)
John of Salisbury
93(2)
Aristotle and the Late Middle Ages
95(1)
Thomas Aquinas
96(4)
Human Nature and Society
96(1)
Types of Law
97(1)
Kingship, Tyranny, and the Family
98(1)
Church-State Relations and Tolerance
99(1)
Conclusion
100(1)
Notes
101(2)
Additional Readings
103(1)
Dante and Marsilius: The End of Medieval Political Unity
104(8)
Introduction
104(1)
Dante
104(3)
Human Nature
105(1)
Political Society
105(1)
Source of Secular Authority
106(1)
Marsilius of Padua
107(2)
Structure and Laws of the State
107(1)
Church--State Conflict
108(1)
Conclusion
109(1)
Notes
110(1)
Additional Readings
111(1)
Part Three MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT
Machiavelli: Escaping Anarchy
112(21)
Introduction
112(2)
Style, Substance, and Goals
114(1)
Machiavelli's Method
115(1)
Human Nature
116(1)
Power
117(2)
Elites and Masses
119(1)
Fortune and Virtue
120(1)
Gender
121(1)
Liberty and War
122(1)
Forms of Government
123(5)
Republics
124(1)
Tyrannies
124(2)
Constitutional Rule: Monarchies and Republics
126(1)
Nation-States
127(1)
Conclusion
128(2)
Notes
130(1)
Additional Readings
131(2)
Luther and Calvin: The Religious Basis of Modern Political Thought
133(12)
Introduction
133(2)
The Protestant Reformation
135(1)
Martin Luther
135(3)
Theology
135(2)
Political Implications
137(1)
John Calvin
138(4)
Political Theology
139(3)
Women and the Protestant Reformation
142(1)
Conclusion
143(1)
Notes
143(1)
Additional Readings
144(1)
Copernicus, Bacon, Descartes, and Newton: The Scientific Basis of Modern Politics
145(13)
Introduction
145(1)
The Aristotelian-Christian Scientific World
145(2)
Nicholas Copernicus
147(2)
Francis Bacon
149(3)
Rene Descartes
152(1)
Isaac Newton
153(1)
Women and the Scientific Revolution
154(1)
Conclusion
155(1)
Notes
155(1)
Additional Readings
156(2)
Hobbes: Securing Peace
158(16)
Introduction
158(2)
Hobbes's Method
160(1)
Human Nature
161(1)
State of Nature
162(1)
Basis of Government and Political Obligation
163(2)
Sovereign Authority
165(1)
Natural and Civil Law
166(1)
Liberty
167(1)
Citizenship, Class, and Gender
168(2)
Forms of Government
170(1)
Conclusion
170(1)
Notes
171(2)
Additional Readings
173(1)
Locke: Protecting Property
174(17)
Introduction
174(1)
Locke's Method
175(1)
Human Nature
176(1)
State of Nature
177(2)
Labor Theory of Estate
177(2)
Natural Law
179(1)
State of War
179(1)
Basis of Government
180(1)
Religious Toleration
181(1)
Gender, Class, and Citizenship
182(2)
Institutions and Forms of Government
184(1)
Despotism and Revolution
185(1)
Conclusion
186(2)
Notes
188(1)
Additional Readings
189(2)
Rousseau: Establishing Democracy
191(21)
Introduction
191(1)
Rousseau's Method
192(1)
State of Nature and Human Nature
193(4)
Path to Liberation
197(1)
The Social Contract
197(4)
The General Will
199(1)
Voting and Counting Votes
200(1)
Rights of Members
201(1)
Citizenship, Gender, and Education
201(3)
Freedom and Force
203(1)
Necessary Conditions for Securing a Contract
204(2)
The Legislator
204(1)
The Civil Religion
205(1)
Geography and Wealth
206(1)
Executive Institutions
206(1)
Forms of Government
207(1)
Conclusion
208(1)
Notes
209(2)
Additional Readings
211(1)
Mary Wollstonecraft: Origins of Modern Feminism
212(14)
Introduction
212(1)
Wollstonecraft's Method
213(3)
Human Nature
216(2)
Women, the Family, and Government
218(2)
The Liberation of Women
220(1)
Women, Men, and Civil Society
221(1)
Conclusion
222(2)
Notes
224(1)
Additional Readings
225(1)
Hume, Burke, and Kant: Critics and Defenders of the Enlightenment
226(13)
Introduction
226(1)
David Hume
227(4)
Edmund Burke
231(2)
Immanuel Kant
233(3)
Conclusion
236(1)
Notes
237(1)
Additional Readings
238(1)
Mill: Grounding Liberty
239(17)
Introduction
239(1)
Utilitarianism
240(1)
Mill's Revision of Utilitarian Method
241(1)
Human Nature
242(1)
Tyranny of the Majority
243(1)
Liberty
244(2)
Benefits of Liberty
245(1)
Spheres of Liberty
246(1)
Truth
246(1)
Limited Government
247(1)
Political Economy
248(1)
Women, Politics, and the Family
249(1)
Representative Government
250(2)
Structure and Role of Government
252(1)
Conclusion
253(1)
Notes
254(1)
Additional Readings
255(1)
Marx: Revealing History's Meaning
256(21)
Introduction
256(1)
Marx's Problem
257(3)
Method: From Hegel to Marx
260(2)
Stages of History
262(4)
Prehistory
263(1)
Precapitalism
264(1)
Capitalism
265(1)
Poverty and Alienation
266(1)
Scientific Socialism
267(1)
Gender and the Family
268(2)
The Future
270(2)
Conclusion
272(2)
Notes
274(2)
Additional Readings
276(1)
Part Four POSTMODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT AND BEYOND
Postmodern Political Thought: Freud, Nietzsche and the End of Reason
277(18)
Introduction
277(1)
Sigmund Freud
278(3)
Endless Human Misery
278(2)
Costs of Civilization
280(1)
Friedrich Nietzsche
281(3)
Human Nature and the Transvaluation of Values
282(1)
Crisis of Modernity
282(2)
Nietzsche, Freud, and the Origins of Postmodern Politics
284(2)
Feminism and Postmodern Politics
286(3)
Political Philosophy at the Dawn of the Twenty-First Century
289(3)
Conclusion
292(1)
Notes
292(2)
Additional Readings
294(1)
Inventors of Ideas and Their Inventions: The Continuing Challenge
295(6)
The Importance of Ideas
295(1)
Continuity and Change
296(1)
Conclusion
297(2)
Notes
299(1)
Additional Readings
300(1)
Index 301


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