CART

(0) items

Language Assessment : Principles and Classroom Practices,9780130988348
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Language Assessment : Principles and Classroom Practices

by
ISBN13:

9780130988348

ISBN10:
0130988340
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Pearson ESL
List Price: $62.33
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $9.98
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Language Assessment : Principles and Classroom Practices
    Language Assessment : Principles and Classroom Practices




Summary

Best-selling author H. Douglas Brown offers a clear, authoritative manual of testing and assessment in the second language classroom. Language Assessment looks at essential principles for assessment, as well as the critical tools that teachers need for fair, effective evaluation.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Text Credits xii
1 Testing, Assessing, and Teaching 1(18)
What Is a Test?,
3(1)
Assessment and Teaching,
4(3)
Informal and Formal Assessment,
5(1)
Formative and Summative Assessment,
6(1)
Norm-Referenced and Criterion-Referenced Tests,
7(1)
Approaches to Language Testing: A Brief History,
7(6)
Discrete-Point and Integrative Testing,
8(2)
Communicative Language Testing,
10(1)
Performance-Based Assessment,
10(3)
Current Issues in Classroom Testing, ll
New Views on Intelligence, ll
Traditional and "Alternative" Assessment,
13(1)
Computer-Based Testing,
14(2)
Exercises,
16(2)
For Your Further Reading,
18(1)
2 Principles of Language Assessment 19(23)
Practicality,
19(1)
Reliability,
20(2)
Student-Related Reliability,
21(1)
Rater Reliability,
21(1)
Test Administration Reliability,
21(1)
Test Reliability,
22(1)
Validity,
22(6)
Content-Related Evidence,
22(2)
Criterion-Related Evidence,
24(1)
Construct-Related Evidence,
25(1)
Consequential Validity,
26(1)
Face Validity,
26(2)
Authenticity,
28(1)
Washback,
28(2)
Applying Principles to the Evaluation of Classroom Tests,
30(8)
1. Are the test procedures practical?
31(1)
2. Is the test reliable?
31(1)
3. Does the procedure demonstrate content validity?
32(1)
4. Is the procedure face valid and "biased for best"?
33(2)
5. Are the test tasks as authentic as possible?
35(2)
6. Does the test offer beneficial washback to the learner?
37(1)
Exercises,
38(3)
For Your Further Reading,
41(1)
3 Designing Classroom Language Tests 42(24)
Test Types,
43(5)
Language Aptitude Tests,
43(1)
Proficiency Tests,
44(1)
Placement Tests,
45(1)
Diagnostic Tests,
46(1)
Achievement Tests,
47(1)
Some Practical Steps to Test Construction,
48(13)
Assessing Clear, Unambiguous Objectives,
49(1)
Drawing Up Test Specifications,
50(2)
Devising Test Tasks,
52(3)
Designing Multiple-Choice Test Items,
55(6)
1. Design each item to measure a specific objective,
56(1)
2. State both stem and options as simply and directly as possible,
57(1)
3. Make certain that the intended answer is clearly the only correct one,
58(1)
4. Use item indices to accept, discard, or revise items,
58(3)
Scoring, Grading, and Giving Feedback,
61(3)
Scoring,
61(1)
Grading,
62(1)
Giving Feedback,
62(2)
Exercises,
64(1)
For Your Further Reading,
65(1)
4 Standardized Testing 66(38)
What Is Standardization?,
67(1)
Advantages and Disadvantages of Standardized Tests,
68(1)
Developing a Standardized Test,
69(13)
1. Determine the purpose and objectives of the test,
70(1)
2. Design test specifications,
70(4)
3. Design, select, and arrange test tasks/items,
74(4)
4. Make appropriate evaluations of different kinds of items,
78(1)
5. Specify scoring procedures and reporting formats,
79(2)
6. Perform ongoing construct validation studies,
81(1)
Standardized Language Proficiency Testing,
82(1)
Four Standardized Language Proficiency Tests,
83(4)
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL),
84(1)
Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB),
85(1)
International English Language Testing System (IELTS),
85(1)
Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC®),
86(1)
Exercises,
87(1)
For Your Further Reading,
87(1)
Appendix to Chapter 4: Commercial Proficiency Tests: Sample Items and Tasks,
88(16)
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL®),
88(5)
Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB),
93(3)
International English Language Testing System (IELTS),
96(4)
Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC®),
100(4)
5 Standards-Based Assessment 104(12)
ELD Standards,
105(1)
ELD Assessment,
106(2)
CASAS and SCANS,
108(1)
Teacher Standards,
109(1)
The Consequences of Standards-Based and Standardized Testing,
110(3)
Test Bias,
111(1)
Test-Driven Learning and Teaching,
112(1)
Ethical Issues: Critical Language Testing,
113(2)
Exercises,
115(1)
For Your Further Reading,
115(1)
6 Assessing Listening 116(24)
Observing the Performance of the Four Skills,
117(2)
The Importance of Listening,
119(1)
Basic Types of Listening,
119(2)
Micro- and Macroskills of Listening,
121(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Intensive Listening,
122(3)
Recognizing Phonological and Morphological Elements,
123(1)
Paraphrase Recognition,
124(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Responsive Listening,
125(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Selective Listening,
125(5)
Listening Cloze,
125(2)
Information Transfer,
127(3)
Sentence Repetition,
130(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Extensive Listening,
130(8)
Dictation,
131(1)
Communicative Stimulus-Response Tasks,
132(3)
Authentic Listening Tasks,
135(3)
Exercises,
138(1)
For Your Further Reading,
139(1)
7 Assessing Speaking 140(45)
Basic Types of Speaking,
141(1)
Micro- and Macroskills of Speaking,
142(3)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Imitative Speaking,
l44
PhonePass® Test,
145(2)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Intensive Speaking,
147(12)
Directed Response Tasks,
147(1)
Read-Aloud Tasks,
147(2)
Sentence/Dialogue Completion Tasks and Oral Questionnaires,
149(2)
Picture-Cued Tasks,
151(8)
Translation (of Limited Stretches of Discourse),
159(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Responsive Speaking,
159(3)
Question and Answer,
159(2)
Giving Instructions and Directions,
161(1)
Paraphrasing,
161(1)
Test of Spoken English (TSE®),
162(5)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Interactive Speaking,
167(9)
Interview,
167(7)
Role Play,
174(1)
Discussions and Conversations,
175(1)
Games,
175(1)
Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI),
176(3)
Designing Assessment: Extensive Speaking,
179(4)
Oral Presentations,
179(1)
Picture-Cued Story-Telling,
180(2)
Retelling a Story, News Event,
182(1)
Translation (of Extended Prose),
182(1)
Exercises,
183(1)
For Your Further Reading,
184(1)
8 Assessing Reading 185(33)
Types (Genres) of Reading,
186(1)
Microskills, Macroskills, and Strategies for Reading,
187(2)
Types of Reading,
189(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Perceptive Reading,
190(4)
Reading Aloud,
190(1)
Written Response,
191(1)
Multiple-Choice,
191(1)
Picture-Cued Items,
191(3)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Selective Reading,
194(7)
Multiple-Choice (for Form-Focused Criteria),
194(3)
Matching Tasks,
197(1)
Editing Tasks,
198(1)
Picture-Cued Tasks,
199(1)
Gap-Filling Tasks,
200(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Interactive Reading,
201(11)
Clone Tasks,
201(3)
Impromptu Reading Plus Comprehension Questions,
204(2)
Short-Answer Tasks,
206(1)
Editing (Longer Texts),
207(2)
Scanning,
209(1)
Ordering Tasks,
209(1)
Information Transfer: Reading Charts, Maps, Graphs, Diagrams,
210(2)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Extensive Reading,
212(4)
Skimming Tasks,
213(1)
Summarizing and Responding,
213(2)
Note-Taking and Outlining,
215(1)
Exercises,
216(1)
For Your Further Reading,
217(1)
9 Assessing Writing 218(33)
Genres of Written Language,
219(1)
Types of Writing Performance,
220(1)
Micro- and Macroskills of Writing,
220(1)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Imitative Writing,
221(4)
Tasks in [Hand] Writing Letters, Words, and Punctuation,
221(2)
Spelling Tasks and Detecting Phoneme-Grapheme Correspondences,
223(2)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Intensive (Controlled) Writing,
225(6)
Dictation and Dicto-Comp,
225(1)
Grammatical Transformation Tasks,
226(1)
Picture-Cued Tasks,
226(3)
Vocabulary Assessment Tasks,
229(1)
Ordering Tasks,
230(1)
Short-Answer and Sentence Completion Tasks,
230(1)
Issues in Assessing Responsive and Extensive Writing,
231(2)
Designing Assessment Tasks: Responsive and Extensive Writing,
233(4)
Paraphrasing,
234(1)
Guided Question and Answer,
234(1)
Paragraph Construction Tasks,
235(1)
Strategic Options,
236(1)
Test of Written English (TWE®),
237(4)
Scoring Methods for Responsive and Extensive Writing,
241(5)
Holistic Scoring,
242(1)
Primary Trait Scoring,
242(1)
Analytic Scoring,
243(3)
Beyond Scoring: Responding to Extensive Writing,
246(3)
Assessing Initial Stages of the Process of Composing,
247(1)
Assessing Later Stages of the Process of Composing,
247(2)
Exercises,
249(1)
For Your Further Reading,
250(1)
10 Beyond Tests: Alternatives in Assessment 251(30)
The Dilemma of Maximizing Both Practicality and Washback,
252(2)
Performance-Based Assessment,
254(2)
Portfolios,
256(4)
Journals,
260(4)
Conferences and Interviews,
264(2)
Observations,
266(4)
Self and Peer-Assessments,
270(9)
Types of Self and Peer-Assessment,
271(5)
Guidelines for Self and Peer-Assessment,
276(1)
A Taxonomy of Self and Peer-Assessment Tasks,
277(2)
Exercises,
279(1)
For Your Further Reading,
280(1)
11 Grading and Student Evaluation 281(22)
Philosophy of Grading: What Should Grades Reflect?
282(9)
Guidelines for Selecting Grading Criteria,
284(1)
Calculating Grades: Absolute and Relative Grading,
285(4)
Teachers' Perceptions of Appropriate Grade Distributions,
289(2)
Institutional Expectations and Constraints,
291(3)
Cross-Cultural Factors and the Question of Difficulty,
292(1)
What Do Letter Grades "Mean"?,
293(1)
Alternatives to Letter Grading,
294(5)
Some Principles and Guidelines for Grading and Evaluation,
299(1)
Exercises,
300(2)
For Your Further Reading,
302(1)
Bibliography 303(10)
Name Index 313(2)
Subject Index 315
0791457605
Preface ix
Acknowledgments xiii
Part 1: Introduction
Chapter 1. School Reform and Educational Improvement: Challenges and Responses
3(12)
Chapter 2. Attachment and Knowledge
15(14)
Chapter 3. Building the Education Field: Getting Parents, Schools, and Communities Together
29(12)
Chapter 4. Baltimore, the Schools, and the Southeast Education Task Force
41(18)
Part 2: Research as a Way of Getting Started
Chapter 5. Getting Started, Getting Bearings
59(14)
Part 3: Participation
Chapter 6. Creating the Southeast Education Task Force
73(14)
Chapter 7. Organizing Networks for Southeast Education: Engaging the School System
87(10)
Chapter 8. Organizing Networks for Southeast Education: Connecting with Parents and Community Institutions
97(24)
Part 4: Action
Chapter 9. Doing Something
121(8)
Chapter 10. Education and the Empowerment Zone: Participation in the Service of Action
129(18)
Part 5: Research as a Means to Action
Chapter 11. Acting as a Way of Knowing: Action Research
147(14)
Chapter 12. Knowing as a Means to Acting: Research for Action
161(20)
Part 6: Money
Chapter 13. Money Matters: The Costs of Participation, Research, and Action
181(14)
Part 7: Tensions between Attachment and Knowledge
Chapter 14. Realities and Fantasies in University-Community Partnerships
195(14)
Chapter 15. Why Community-School Partnerships Are Unlikely
209(16)
Chapter 16. Building Networks in Turbulent Fields: Tension between Attachment and Knowledge
225(16)
Part 8: Lessons and Conclusions
Chapter 17. Evaluating the Southeast Education Task Force
241(16)
Chapter 18. Can Community Action Reform Schools or Improve Education?
257(16)
Notes 273(4)
References 277(14)
Index 291


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...