CART

(0) items

The Last Days of Socrates

by Unknown
ISBN13:

9780140455496

ISBN10:
0140455493
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/25/2011
Publisher(s):
Penguin Classics
List Price: $14.00

Rent Book

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$4.99

Buy New Book

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
N9780140455496
$11.90

Used Book

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eBook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $14.71
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 1/25/2011.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

Euthyphro/Apology/Crito/Phaedro 'Consider just this, and give your minds to this alone: whether or not what I say is just' Plato's account of Socrates' trial and death (399 BCE) is one of the most significant moments in western literature and philosophy. In these four works Plato illustrates Socrates' fundamental belief in the necessity for us to 'examine ourselves and others', portraying the man himself living and dying by his philosophy. In Euthyphro, Socrates debates the nature of 'piety'; in Apology, he defends himself in court against the charge of impiety; in Crito, now in prison and awaiting execution, he considers whether escape can be justified; finally, in Phaedo, he reflects on the ethics of suicide, describes his intellectual history, and mounts a series of arguments for supposing that we continue to exist as intelligent beings after death. Then, after a magnificent description of the earth and its regions, he drinks the hemlock and dies. Christopher Rowe's introduction to his powerful new translations aims to provide a brief sketch of the context and themes of these four Platonic dialogues, while insisting that they have less to do with historical fact than with an exposition and defence of Plato's Socratic philosophy. The volume also includes a chronology, suggestions for further reading, and a short introduction to each individual dialogue. Translated with an introduction and notes by Christopher Rowe

Author Biography

Christopher Rowe's introduction to his powerful new translations aims to provide a brief sketch of the context and themes of these four Platonic dialogues, while insisting that they have less to do with historical fact than with an exposition and defence of Plato's Socratic philosophy. The volume also includes a chronology, suggestions for further reading, and a short introduction to each individual dialogue.

Table of Contents

Chronologyp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. x
General Introductionp. xi
Select Bibliography and Further Readingp. xxviii
A Note on the Text and Translationp. xxxiii
Introduction to Euthyphrop. 3
Euthyphrop. 6
Introduction to the Apologyp. 29
The Apology of Socrates ('Socrates' Defence')p. 32
Introduction to Critop. 63
Critop. 66
Introduction to Phaedop. 83
Phaedop. 87
Notesp. 171
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...