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The Law And Special Education,9780131106703
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The Law And Special Education

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780131106703

ISBN10:
0131106708
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $101.33
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Summary

The second edition of one of the top special education law books in the field acquaints readers with the legal development and current legal requirements of special education. The book includes new information on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Special Education K-12 Teachers and Administrators.

Table of Contents

Introduction to the American Legal System
1(16)
The American Legal System
1(13)
Federalism
1(1)
Sources of Law
2(4)
Sources of Judicial Power
6(2)
Court Structure
8(5)
Precedence
13(1)
Holding and Dicta
13(1)
The Opinion
14(1)
The Law and Special Education
14(1)
Summary
15(1)
For Further Information
15(1)
References
16(1)
Legal Research
17(26)
Primary Sources
18(9)
Statutes and Regulations
18(5)
Case Law
23(4)
Finding Tools
27(8)
The Annotated Codes
27(1)
The West Digest System
27(3)
Shepard's Citators
30(5)
Secondary Sources
35(3)
Legal Periodicals and Law Reviews
35(2)
Loose-Leaf Services
37(1)
Computers and Legal Research
38(1)
Legal Research Strategies
39(1)
Step 1: Analyze the Problem
39(1)
Step 2: Conduct the Research
40(1)
Step 3: Evaluate the Results
40(1)
Summary
40(1)
For Further Information
41(1)
References
42(1)
Legal Research on the Internet
43(18)
The World Wide Web
44(1)
Internet Research Tools
45(3)
Directories and Search Engines
45(1)
Online Communities
46(1)
Weblogs (Blogs)
46(1)
Electronic Newsletters
47(1)
Law-Related Resources on the Internet
48(2)
The Law and Special Education
48(1)
Special Ed Connection
49(1)
Education Law Association (ELA)
49(1)
Wrightslaw
50(1)
The Council for Exceptional Children
50(1)
Government Resources Online
50(5)
Government Sponsored Websites
50(3)
Government Publications
53(1)
U.S. Courts: The Federal Judiciary
53(1)
FirstGov
54(1)
Online Law Libraries
55(1)
Legal Information Institute (LII) Cornell University Law School
55(1)
Jurist Legal News and Research
55(1)
A Strategy for Legal Research on the Internet
56(3)
Preparing for Research
56(1)
Organizing Your Hard Drive or Data Disk
56(1)
Conducting the Research
57(1)
Locating Information
57(1)
Conducting an Internet Interview
57(1)
Evaluating the Data
58(1)
Summary
59(1)
For Further Information
59(1)
References
59(2)
The History of the Law and Children with Disabilities
61(22)
Compulsory Attendance
62(1)
The Exclusion of Students with Disabilities
62(1)
Parental Advocacy
63(3)
The White House Conference of 1910
63(1)
Public School Programming
63(1)
The Organization of Advocacy Groups
64(2)
The Civil Rights Movement and Brown v. Board of Education
66(1)
Parental Advocacy in the Wake of Brown
66(1)
The Equal Opportunity Cases
67(2)
Pennsylvania Association for Retarded Citizens v. Pennsylvania, 1972
67(1)
Mills v. Board of Education, 1972
68(1)
Additional Cases
68(1)
Recent Federal Involvement
69(7)
State Education Statutes
76(2)
The History of Special Education Law: From Access to Accountability
78(1)
Summary
79(1)
For Further Information
79(1)
References
80(3)
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
83(34)
The Development of the IDEA
84(2)
Early Court Rulings and Legislation
84(1)
The Passage of the IDEA
85(1)
The Purpose and Structure of the IDEA
86(16)
Purpose of the IDEA
86(4)
Structure of the IDEA
90(12)
The IDEA and the Reauthorization Process
102(9)
Amendments to the IDEA
103(1)
The IDEA Amendments of 1997
103(3)
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004
106(5)
Funding of the IDEA
111(2)
Monitoring and Enforcing the IDEA
113(1)
Summary
114(1)
For Further Information
115(1)
References
115(2)
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
117(38)
The Development of Section 504
118(2)
The Purpose and Structure of Section 504
120(7)
The Purpose of Section 504
120(1)
Who Is Protected?
120(7)
The Structure of Section 504
127(1)
Major Principles of Section 504
127(9)
Protection from Discrimination
127(7)
Free Appropriate Public Education
134(1)
Evaluation and Placement Procedures
135(1)
Procedural Safeguards
136(1)
School District Responsibilities Under Section 504
136(10)
Administrative Responsibilities
136(3)
Educational Obligations
139(7)
Enforcement of Section 504
146(6)
Filing a Grievance
147(1)
Filing a Complaint with the Office of Civil Rights
147(2)
Filing for a Due Process Hearing
149(1)
Filing a Suit in Federal Court
149(1)
Comparison of the IDEA and Section 504
149(3)
Summary
152(1)
For Further Information
152(1)
References
153(2)
The Americans with Disabilities Act
155(20)
The Development of the ADA
156(1)
The Purpose and Structure of the ADA
157(12)
Purpose of the ADA
158(1)
Who Is Protected?
158(3)
Structure of the ADA
161(8)
School District Responsibilities
169(2)
ADA Compliance Coordinator
170(1)
Self-Evaluation
170(1)
Transition Plan
171(1)
Prohibition Against Discrimination
171(1)
Summary
171(1)
For Further Information
172(1)
References
172(3)
The No Child Left Behind Act
175(42)
The Development of the NCLB
176(4)
The History of Federal Involvement in Education: From Assistance to Accountability
176(4)
The Purpose, Goals, and Structure of NCLB
180(8)
The Purpose of No Child Left Behind
180(1)
The Goals of No Child Left Behind
181(1)
The Structure of No Child Left Behind
181(7)
The Major Principles of NCLB
188(24)
Accountability for Results
188(14)
Scientifically Based Instruction
202(3)
Highly Qualified Teachers and Paraprofessionals
205(7)
Summary
212(1)
For Further Information on NCLB
213(1)
For Further Information of Scientifically Based Research
213(1)
References
214(3)
Free Appropriate Public Education
217(32)
The FAPE Mandate of the IDEA
218(1)
Components of a FAPE
219(2)
Free Education
219(1)
State Standards
220(1)
Appropriate Education
220(1)
Related Services and FAPE
221(4)
Litigation and Related Services
223(2)
Litigation and FAPE
225(7)
Hendrick Hudson School District v. Rowley, 1982
226(6)
Methodology and FAPE
232(6)
FAPE and Lovaas Therapy
234(3)
Extended School Year and FAPE
237(1)
Determining Student Placement and FAPE
238(3)
Determining Placement
239(1)
Placement Factors
240(1)
Graduation and FAPE
241(1)
IDEA 1997, IDEA 2004, and FAPE
242(1)
Summary
243(1)
For Further Information
244(1)
References
244(5)
Identification, Assessment, and Evaluation
249(24)
Definition of Assessment
250(2)
Prereferral Decisions
250(1)
Entitlement Decisions
250(1)
Programming Decisions
251(1)
Accountability / Outcome Decisions
251(1)
The Assessment / Evaluation Process
252(4)
Protection in Evaluation Procedures
256(6)
Child Find
256(1)
Parental Consent
256(1)
Preplacement Evaluation
257(1)
Comprehensiveness of the Evaluation
257(1)
Qualifications of Evaluators
258(1)
Evaluation Materials and Procedures
258(2)
Special Rules for Eligibility Determination
260(1)
Nondiscriminatory Evaluation
260(2)
Interpretation of Evaluation Data
262(1)
Medical Diagnosis and Eligibility Determination
263(1)
Reevaluation
263(1)
Independent Educational Evaluations
264(2)
Accountability Efforts and Students with Disabilities
266(3)
Minimum Competency Tests
267(1)
Including Students with Disabilities in Accountability Efforts
268(1)
Summary
269(1)
For Further Information
270(1)
References
270(3)
The Individualized Education Program
273(36)
Purposes of the IEP
275(2)
Communication
275(1)
Management
276(1)
Accountability
276(1)
Compliance and Monitoring
276(1)
Evaluation
276(1)
The IEP Mandate
277(1)
IEP Development
277(22)
The IEP Planning Process
277(4)
The IEP Team
281(6)
Content of the IEP
287(12)
Substantive Requirements
299(4)
Parental Participation
300(2)
Reviewing and Revising the IEP
302(1)
Communicating the Requirements of the IEP
302(1)
Placement in Private Schools
303(1)
Section 504 and the IEP
303(1)
Litigation on the IEP
303(2)
Summary
305(1)
For Further Information
305(1)
References
306(3)
Least Restrictive Environment
309(26)
LRE, Mainstreaming, and Inclusion
310(4)
The LRE Mandate
311(1)
Continuum of Alternative Placements
312(2)
Related Factors in Educational Placements
314(2)
Placement in the Neighborhood School
314(1)
Nonacademic Programming
315(1)
The Interests of Peers Without Disabilities
315(1)
Judicial Standards of Review
316(10)
The Roncker Portability Test
316(1)
The Daniel Two-Part Test
317(2)
The Rachel H. Four-Factor Test
319(2)
Clyde K. v. Puyallup School District
321(2)
The Hartmann Three-Part Test
323(1)
Summary of Judicial Standard of Review
324(1)
The Burden of Proof
324(2)
Standards for Determining the LRE
326(4)
Individualization
327(1)
Benefits to the Student
328(1)
Effect on Peers
328(1)
Appropriateness
328(1)
Integration
329(1)
The Use of Supplementary Aids and Services
329(1)
A Model for Determining LRE
330(1)
Summary
331(1)
For Further Information
332(1)
References
332(3)
Procedural Safeguards
335(42)
Procedural Rights of Parents
336(3)
Identification of Parents
336(2)
Surrogate Parents
338(1)
General Procedural Requirements
339(5)
Notice Requirements
340(1)
Consent Requirements
340(2)
Opportunity to Examine Records
342(1)
Independent Educational Evaluation
343(1)
Dispute Resolution
344(13)
Mediation
344(2)
Resolution Session
346(1)
The Due Process Hearing
346(8)
Alternatives to the Due Process Hearing
354(1)
School District Responsibilities in the Hearing
355(2)
Remedies
357(15)
Sovereign Immunity
357(1)
Attorney's Fees
358(5)
Injunctive Relief
363(1)
Tuition Reimbursement
363(3)
Compensatory Education
366(1)
Compensatory Awards Under the IDEA
367(1)
Punitive Damages
368(4)
Summary
372(1)
For Further Information
373(1)
References
373(4)
Disciplining Students with Disabilities
377(42)
Discipline in the Schools
378(1)
Procedural Due Process: The Right to Fair Procedures
379(4)
Developing Schoolwide Discipline Policies
379(2)
Extending Due Process Protection to Students
381(2)
Ensuring That Discipline Practices Are Nondiscriminatory
383(1)
Substantive Due Process: The Right to Reasonableness
383(1)
The IDEA and Discipline
384(16)
Addressing Problem Behavior in the IEP Process
386(3)
Disciplinary Procedures
389(6)
The Manifestation Determination
395(2)
Interim Alternative Educational Settings
397(2)
The Stay-Put Provision
399(1)
Disciplining Students Not Yet Eligible for Special Education
400(4)
Rodiriecus L. v. Waukegan School District, 1996
401(1)
Honig Injunctions
401(2)
Referral to Law Enforcement and Courts
403(1)
The Legal Status of Disciplinary Procedures
404(5)
Permitted Procedures
404(1)
Controlled Procedures
404(3)
Prohibited Procedures
407(1)
Weapons
408(1)
School District Responsibilities
409(5)
Formulate and Disseminate Discipline Policies and Procedures
409(2)
Recognize the Dual Disciplinary Standard
411(1)
Document Disciplinary Actions Taken and Evaluate Their Effectiveness
412(2)
Summary
414(2)
For Further Information
416(1)
References
416(3)
Additional Issues
419(32)
Issue #1: Student Records
419(4)
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
420(3)
Summary of Student Records
423(1)
Issue #2: Providing Special Education Services in Private Schools
423(5)
Defining Private Schools
424(1)
Children Enrolled in Private Schools by Their Parents
424(2)
Children Placed in, or Referred to, Private Schools by Public Schools
426(1)
Payment for Educating Children Enrolled in Private Schools Without the Consent of, or Referral by, the Public School
426(1)
Public School Responsibilities Under EDGAR
427(1)
School District Responsibilities to Private School Students
427(1)
Summary of the IDEA and Private Schools
428(1)
Issue #3: The IDEA and the Establishment Clause
428(8)
Everson v. Board of Education, 1947
429(1)
Lemon v. Kurtzman, 1971
430(1)
Grand Rapids School District v. Ball, 1985
431(1)
Aguilar v. Felton, 1985
431(1)
Zobrest v. Catalina Foothills School District
432(1)
The Establishment Clause and the IDEA
433(1)
Post-Zobrest Cases
433(1)
Board of Education of Kiryas Joel Village School District v. Grumet, 1994
434(1)
Agostini v. Felton, 1997
435(1)
Summary of the IDEA and Parochial Schools
435(1)
Issue #4: Liability for Student Injury
436(6)
Tort Laws
436(1)
Intentional Torts
436(2)
Negligence
438(2)
Teachers' Defenses Against Liability
440(1)
School District Responsibilities Regarding Student Care and Supervision
441(1)
Issue #5: Search and Seizure
442(3)
New Jersey v. T.L.O., 1985
442(1)
Cornfield v. Consolidated High School District No. 230, 1983
443(1)
Thomas v. Carthage School District, 1996
444(1)
Locker Searches
444(1)
Summary
445(1)
For Further Information
446(1)
References
447(4)
Appendix A: Major Changes of IDEA 2004 451(10)
Appendix B: Relevant Sections of the U.S. Constitution 461(2)
Glossary 463(2)
Index of Cases 465(4)
Author Index 469(4)
Subject Index 473


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