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Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry and Drama (Interactive Edition with CD-ROM)

by ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780321015570

ISBN10:
0321015576
Format:
Hardcover w/CD
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $137.20

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Summary

Literature, 7/e, the most popular introduction of its kind, is organized into three genres - Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. This edition reflects a balance of classic works along with contemporary and non-Western authors. As in past editions, the authors' collective poetic voice brings personal warmth and a human perspective to the discussion of literature, adding to students' interest in the readings. In this edition, the coverage of writing about literature is enhanced through Writing Critically sections in every major chapter.

Table of Contents

Preface xxxviii(10)
About the Authors xlviii
FICTION 1(646)
1 Reading a Story
3(17)
FABLE AND TALE
4(5)
W. Somerset Maugham
THE APPOINTMENT IN SAMARRA A servant tries to gallop away from Death in this brief sardonic fable retold in memorable from by a popular storyteller.
4(2)
Jakob Grimm
Wilhelm Grimm
GODFATHER DEATH Neither God nor the Devil came to the christening. In this stark folk tale, a young man receives magical powers with a string attached.
6(2)
Chuang Tzu
INDEPENDENCE The Prince of Ch'u asks the philosopher Chuang Tzu to become his advisor and gets a surprising reply in this classic Chinese fable.
8(1)
PLOT
9(2)
THE SHORT STORY
11(6)
John Updike
A & P In walk three girls in nothing but bathing suits, and Sammy finds himself no longer an aproned checkout clerk but an armored knight.
12(5)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE John Updike on Writing, WHY WRITE?
17(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY What's the Plot?
18(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
19(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
19(1)
2 Point of View
20(40)
William Faulkner
A ROSE FOR EMILY Proud, imperious Emily Grierson defied the town from the fortress of her mansion. Who could have guessed the secret that lay within?
26(7)
Edgar Allan Poe
THE TELL-TALE HEART The smoldering eye at last extinguished, a murderer finds that, despite all his attempts at a cover-up, his victim will be heard
33(5)
Raymond Carver
CATHEDRAL He had never expected to find himself trying to describe a cathedral to a blind man. He hadn't even wanted to meet this odd, old friend of his wife
38(11)
Katherine Mansfield
MISS BRILL Sundays had long brought joy to solitary Miss Brill, until one fateful day when she happened to share a bench with two lovers in the park
49(4)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Katherine Mansfield on Writing, CREATING "MISS BRILL"
53(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How Point of View Shapes a Story
53(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
54(1)
STUDENT ESSAY Raymond Carver's Use of First-Person Point of View in "Cathedral"
54(5)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
59(1)
3 Character
60(32)
Katherine Anne Porter
THE JILTING OF GRANNY WEATHERALL For sixty years Ellen Weatherall has fought back the memory of that terrible day, but now once more the priest waits in the house
63(8)
Alice Walker
EVERYDAY USE When successful Dee visits from the city, she has changed her name. Her mother and sister notice other things have changed, too
71(7)
Isaac Bashevis Singer
SAUL BELLOW
GIMPEL THE FOOL Gimpel the baker was the most gullible man in creation, and the villagers knew it. Did he believe a cow laid brass eggs? Did he believe his children were his own?
78(11)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Isaac Bashevis Singer on Writing, THE CHARACTER OF GIMPEL
89(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How Character Creates Action
90(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
91(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
91(1)
4 Setting
92(45)
Kate Chopin
THE STORM Even with her husband away, Calixta feels happily, securely married. Why then should she not shelter an old admirer from the rain?
95(5)
Jack London
TO BUILD A FIRE Seventy-five degrees below zero. Alone except for one mistrustful wolf dog, a man finds himself battling a relentless force
100(11)
T. Coraghessan Boyle
GREASY LAKE Murky and strewn with beer cans, the lake appears a wasteland. On its shore three "dangerous characters" learn a lesson one grim night
111(8)
Amy Tan
A PAIR OF TICKETS A young woman flies with her father to China to meet two half sisters she never knew existed
119(15)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Amy Tan on Writing, SETTING THE VOICE
134(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How Time and Place Set a Story
135(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
136(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
136(1)
5 Tone and Style
137(38)
Ernest Hemingway
A CLEAN, WELL-LIGHTED PLACE All by himself each night, the old man lingers in the bright cafe. What does he need more than brandy? One other knew
141(4)
William Faulkner
BARN BURNING This time when Ab Snopes wields his blazing torch, his son Sarty faces a dilemma: whether to obey or defy the vengeful old man
145(13)
IRONY
158(14)
Guy de Maupassant
THE NECKLACE Having no jewels to wear to the ball, a young woman borrows her rich friend's diamond necklace--with disastrous results.
160(7)
Jorge Luis Borges
THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MARK A young man from Buenos Aires is trapped by a flood on an isolated ranch. To pass the time he reads the Gospel to a family with unforeseen results.
167(5)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Ernest Hemingway on Writing, THE DIRECT STYLE
172(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Be Style Conscious
172(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
173(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
173(2)
6 Theme
175(42)
Stephen Crane
THE OPEN BOAT In a lifeboat circled by sharks, tantalized by glimpses of land, a reporter scrutinizes Fate and learns about comradeship
177(19)
Nathaniel Hawthorne
YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN Urged on through deepening woods, a young Puritan sees--or dreams he sees--good villagers hasten toward a diabolic rite
196(11)
Luke 15:11-32
THE PARABLE OF THE PRODIGAL SON A father has two sons. One demands his inheritance now and leaves to spend it with disastrous results
207(1)
Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
HARRISON BERGERON Are you handsome? Off with your eyebrows! Are you brainy? Let a transmitter sound thought-shattering beeps inside your ear
208(6)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., on Writing, THE THEMES OF SCIENCE FICTION
214(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Stating the Theme
215(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
215(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
215(2)
7 Symbol
217(30)
John Steinbeck
THE CHRYSANTHEMUMS Fenced-in Elisa feels emotionally starved. Then her life promises to blossom with the arrival of the scissors-grinding man
219(9)
Shirley Jackson
THE LOTTERY Splintered and faded, the sinister black box had worked its annual terror for longer than anyone in town could remember
228(7)
Ursula K. Le Guin
THE ONES WHO WALK AWAY FROM OMELAS Omelas is the perfect city. All of its inhabitants are happy. But everyone's prosperity depends on a hidden evil
235(6)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Ursula K. Le Guin on Writing, NOTE ON "THE ONES WHO WALK AWAY FROM OMELAS"
241(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Recognizing Symbols
242(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
242(1)
STUDENT ESSAY An Analysis of the Symbolism in Steinbeck's "The Chrysanthemums"
243(3)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
246(1)
8 Evaluating a Story
247(19)
Ralph Lombreglia
JUNGLE VIDEO When Walter breaks up with his girlfriend, he doesn't think life can get worse. Then he takes a job with a loony bunch of video producers
249(13)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Ralph Lombreglia on Writing, CREATING "JUNGLE VIDEO"
262(2)
WRITING CRITICALLY Know What You're Judging
264(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
265(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
265(1)
9 Reading Long Stories and Novels
266(74)
James Baldwin
SONNY'S BLUES Two brothers in Harlem see life differently. The older brother is the sensible family man, but Sonny wants to be a jazz musician
272(23)
Franz Kafka
THE METAMORPHOSIS "As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect." Kafka's famous opening sentence introduces one of the most chilling stories in world literature.
295(35)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Franz Kafka on Writing, DISCUSSING The Metamorphosis
330(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Leaving Things Out
331(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
332(1)
STUDENT ESSAY Kafka's Greatness
332(7)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
339(1)
10 A Writer in Depth
340(45)
FLANNERY O'CONNOR
340(39)
Flannery O'Connor
EVERYTHING THAT RISES MUST CONVERGE Julian hates to be seen in public with his ridiculous mother. One night a crisis looms when they ride on a newly desegregated bus.
340(12)
Flannery O'Connor
A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND Wanted: The Misfit, a cold-blooded killer. An ordinary family vacation leads to horror--and one moment of redeeming grace.
352(11)
Flannery O'Connor
REVELATION Mrs. Turpin thinks herself Jesus' favorite child, until she meets a troubled college girl. Soon violence flares in a doctor's waiting room.
363(16)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE
379(4)
Flannery O'Connor on Writing, THE ELEMENT OF SUSPENSE IN "A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND"
379(3)
Flannery O'Connor on Writing, THE SERIOUS WRITER AND THE TIRED READER
382(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How One Story Illuminates Another
383(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
384(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
384(1)
11 Stories for Further Reading
385(262)
Chinua Achebe
CIVIL PEACE Jonathan Iwegbu has survived Nigeria's Civil War. He has found a house and a livelihood. Now he even receives a cash award from the government. Will his good luck end?
385(4)
Ambrose Bierce
AN OCCURRENCE AT OWL CREEK BRIDGE At last, Peyton Farquhar's neck is in the noose. Reality mingles with dream in this classic story of the American Civil War
389(8)
Robert Olen Butler
A GOOD SCENT FROM A STRANGE MOUNTAIN A series of strange dreams tell old Dao that he is near death. Following the traditional custom, the Vietnamese immigrant must invite his entire family to make his farewell, but he finds some mysterious unfinished business.
397(9)
Willa Cather
PAUL'S CASE Paul's teachers can't understand the boy. Then one day, with stolen cash, he boards a train for New York and the life of his dreams
406(15)
John Cheever
THE FIVE-FORTY-EIGHT After their brief affair, Blake fired his secretary. He never expected she would seek revenge
421(11)
Anton Chekhov
THE LADY WITH THE PET DOG Lonely and bored at a seaside resort, they had sought a merely casual affair. How could they know it might deepen and trouble their separate marriages?
432(12)
Kate Chopin
THE STORY OF AN HOUR "There was something coming to her and she was waiting for it, fearfully. What was it? She did not know; it was too subtle and elusive to name."
444(2)
Sandra Cisneros
BARBIE-Q The trouble with buying Barbie dolls is that you want all the clothes, companions, and accessories. But in this barrio things suddenly changed.
446(2)
Ralph Ellison
BATTLE ROYAL A young black man is invited to deliver his high school graduation speech to a gathering of a Southern town's leading white citizens. What promises to be an honor turns into a nightmare of violence, humiliation, and painful self-discovery
448(11)
Mavis Gallant
1933 After the death of her husband, Madame Carette must make a new life for herself and her two daughters in precarious Depression-era Montreal
459(4)
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
A VERY OLD MAN WITH ENORMOUS WINGS What do you do when a worn-out old angel crashes in your yard? Sell tickets or call the priest?
463(6)
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
THE YELLOW WALLPAPER Her husband the doctor prescribed complete rest in the isolated and mysterious country house they rented for the summer. The cure proves worse than the disease in this Gothic classic
469(12)
Nadine Gordimer
THE DEFEATED In a dusty South African mining town, two schoolgirls become unlikely friends. As they grow up together, they start to grow apart
481(11)
Langston Hughes
ON THE ROAD When one snowy night a tramp breaks into a church looking for a place to sleep, he sets off a chain of incredible happenings
492(4)
Zora Neale Hurston
SWEAT Delia's hard work paid for her small house. Now her drunken husband, Sykes, has promised it to another woman
496(10)
Gish Jen
IN THE AMERICAN SOCIETY When Mr. Chang bought a pancake house the business prospered. Then his wife and daughters decided it was time to join a country club
506(11)
James Joyce
ARABY If only he can find her a token, she might love him in return. As night falls, a Dublin boy hurries to make his dream come true
517(5)
Jamaica Kincaid
GIRL "Try to walk like a lady, and not like the slut you are so bent on becoming." An old-fashioned mother tells her daughter how to live.
522(2)
D.H. Lawrence
THE ROCKING-HORSE WINNER Wild-eyed "as if something were going to explode in him," the boy predicts each winning horse, and gamblers rush to bet a thousand pounds.
524(12)
SKY Lee
THE SOONG SISTERS What those three Chinese-Canadian half sisters do best is bicker. Now faced with eviction, they must learn to work together
536(11)
Doris Lessing
A WOMAN ON A ROOF Repairing the roof in the sweltering heat, Tom watched the sunbather who began to haunt his dreams
547(8)
Bernard Malamud
ANGEL LEVINE Broke, ill, and desperate, the tailor Manischevitz begs God for help. But when he discovers a black man in his living room who claims to be a Jewish angel, the tailor refuses to believe. A comic classic.
555(8)
Bobbie Ann Mason
SHILOH After the accident Leroy could no longer work as a truck driver. He hoped to make a new life with his wife, but she seemed strangely different
563(11)
Alice Munro
HOW I MET MY HUSBAND When Edie meets the carnival pilot, her life gets more complicated than she expects
574(13)
Joyce Carol Oates
WHERE ARE YOU GOING, WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN? Alone in the house, Ellie finds herself helpless before the advances of a spellbinding imitation teenager, Arnold Friend
587(13)
Tim O'Brien
THE THINGS THEY CARRIED What each soldier carried into the combat zone was largely determined by necessity, but each man's necessities differed.
600(13)
Frank O'Connor
FIRST CONFESSION A sympathetic Irish priest cross-examines a boy who takes a bread knife to his sister and wants to chop up his grandmother besides
613(6)
Tillie Olsen
I STAND HERE IRONING Deserted by her husband, forced to send away her child, a woman remembers how both she and her daughter managed to survive
619(7)
Leslie Marmon Silko
THE MAN TO SEND RAIN CLOUDS When old Teofilo dies, his friends give him a tribal burial to ensure that the rains will come for the pueblo. But can they also convince Father Paul to take part in the pagan ceremony?
626(3)
Elizabeth Tallent
NO ONE'S A MYSTERY On her eighteenth birthday, her married lover predicted their affair would soon be over. She saw the future differently
629(3)
James Thurber
THE CATBIRD SEAT Imagine mousy Mr. Martin, the shy head file clerk, barging into a woman's apartment, swigging Scotch, and plotting murder most foul
632(6)
Eudora Welty
A VISIT OF CHARITY A campfire girl gets three points if she visits the Old Ladies' Home. Marion finds the women she visits more than she can handle
638(5)
William Carlos Williams
THE USE OF FORCE The little girl won't unclamp her lips for the doctor to examine her throat. What happens next is more than the doctor expected
643(4)
POETRY 647(548)
12 Reading a Poem
651(16)
William Butler Yeats
THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE
653(3)
LYRIC POETRY
656(2)
D.H. Lawrence
PIANO
656(1)
Adrienne Rich
AUNT JENNIFER'S TIGERS
657(1)
NARRATIVE POETRY
658(3)
Anonymous
SIR PATRICK SPENCE
658(2)
Robert Frost
"OUT, OUT--"
660(1)
DRAMATIC POETRY
661(3)
Robert Browning
MY LAST DUCHESS
661(3)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Adrienne Rich on Writing, RECALLING "AUNT JENNIFER'S TIGERS"
664(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY
665(1)
Can a Poem Be Paraphrased?
665(1)
William Stafford
ASK ME
665(1)
William Stafford
A PARAPHRASE OF "ASK ME"
665(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
666(1)
13 Listening to a Voice
667(32)
TONE
667(6)
Theodore Roethke
MY PAPA'S WALTZ
668(1)
Countee Cullen
FOR A LADY I KNOW
669(1)
Anne Bradstreet
THE AUTHOR TO HER BOOK
669(1)
Walt Whitman
TO A LOCOMOTIVE IN WINTER
670(1)
Emily Dickinson
I LIKE TO SEE IT LAP THE MILES
671(1)
Langston Hughes
HOMECOMING
672(1)
Weldon Kees
FOR MY DAUGHTER
672(1)
THE PERSON IN THE POEM
673(7)
Carter Revard
BIRCH CANOE
673(1)
Edwin Arlington Robinson
LUKE HAVERGAL
674(2)
Louise Gluck
THE GOLD LILY
676(1)
William Wordsworth
I WANDERED LONELY AS A CLOUD
676(2)
James Stephens
A GLASS OF BEER
678(1)
Anne Sexton
HER KIND
679(1)
William Carlos Williams
THE RED WHEELBARROW
680(1)
IRONY
680(8)
Robert Creeley
OH NO
681(1)
W.H. Auden
THE UNKNOWN CITIZEN
682(1)
Sharon Olds
RITES OF PASSAGE
683(1)
John Betjeman
IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY
684(1)
Sarah N. Cleghorn
THE GOLF LINKS
685(1)
Tess Gallagher
I STOP WRITING THE POEM
686(1)
Charles Causley
I SAW A JOLLY HUNTER
686(1)
Thomas Hardy
THE WORKBOX
687(1)
FOR REVIEW AND FURTHER STUDY
688(5)
William Blake
THE CHIMNEY SWEEPER
688(1)
Bettie Sellers
IN THE COUNSELOR'S WAITING ROOM
689(1)
Jose Emilio Pacheco
HIGH TREASON
690(1)
William Stafford
AT THE UN-NATIONAL MONUMENT ALONG THE CANADIAN BORDER
690(1)
Richard Lovelace
TO LUCASTA
691(1)
Wilfred Owen
DULCE ET DECORUM EST
691(2)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Wilfred Owen on Writing, WAR POETRY
693(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Paying Attention to the Obvious
693(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
694(1)
STUDENT ESSAY Word Choice, Tone, and Point of View in Roethke's "My Papa's Waltz"
694(4)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
698(1)
14 Words
699(28)
LITERAL MEANING: WHAT A POEM SAYS FIRST
699(6)
William Carlos Williams
THIS IS JUST TO SAY
700(1)
Marianne Moore
SILENCE
701(1)
Henry Taylor
RIDING A ONE-EYED HORSE
702(1)
Robert Graves
DOWN, WANTON, DOWN!
703(1)
Barbara Howes
LOOKING UP AT LEAVES
703(1)
John Donne
BATTER MY HEART, THREE-PERSONED GOD, FOR YOU
704(1)
THE VALUE OF A DICTIONARY
705(5)
Richard Wilbur
IN THE ELEGY SEASON
706(2)
J. V. Cunningham
FRIEND, ON THIS SCAFFOLD THOMAS MORE LIES DEAD
708(1)
David R. Axelrod
THE DEAD HAVE NO RESPECT
708(1)
Kelly Cherry
ADVICE TO A FRIEND WHO PAINTS
708(1)
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
AFTERMATH
709(1)
John Clare
MOUSE'S NEST
709(1)
WORD CHOICE AND WORD ORDER
710(8)
Josephine Miles
REASON
712(3)
Emma Lee Warrior
HOW I CAME TO HAVE A MAN'S NAME
715(1)
Thomas Hardy
THE RUINED MAID
716(1)
Richard Eberhart
THE FURY OF AERIAL BOMBARDMENT
717(1)
Wendy Cope
LONELY HEARTS
717(1)
FOR REVIEW AND FURTHER STUDY
718(6)
E.E. Cummings
ANYONE LIVED IN A PRETTY HOW TOWN
718(1)
Jonathan Holden
THE NAMES OF THE RAPIDS
719(1)
Robert Herrick
UPON JULIA'S CLOTHES
720(1)
Anonymous
CARNATION MILK
721(1)
William Wordsworth
MY HEART LEAPS UP WHEN I BEHOLD
721(1)
William Wordsworth
MUTABILITY
721(1)
Anonymous
SCOTTSBORO
722(1)
Lewis Carroll
JABBERWOCKY
722(2)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Lewis Carroll on Writing, HUMPTY DUMPTY EXPLICATES "JABBERWOCKY"
724(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How Much Difference Does a Word Make?
725(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
726(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
726(1)
15 Saying and Suggesting
727(14)
John Masefield
CARGOES
728(1)
William Blake
LONDON
728(3)
Wallace Stevens
DISILLUSIONMENT OF TEN O'CLOCK
731(1)
Gwendolyn Brooks
THE BEAN EATERS
732(1)
Richard Snyder
A MONGOLOID CHILD HANDLING SHELLS ON THE BEACH
732(1)
Timothy Steele
EPITAPH
733(1)
Geoffrey Hill
MERLIN
733(1)
Walter de la Mare
THE LISTENERS
734(1)
Robert Frost
FIRE AND ICE
735(1)
Cynthia Zarin
SONG
735(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
TEARS, IDLE TEARS
736(1)
Richard Wilbur on Writing, LOVE CALLS US TO THE THINGS OF THIS WORLD
736(2)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE
738(1)
Richard Wilbur
CONCERNING "LOVE CALLS US TO THE THINGS OF THIS WORLD"
738(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY The Ways a Poem Suggests
739(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
740(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
740(1)
16 Imagery
741(23)
Ezra Pound
IN A STATION OF THE METRO
741(1)
Taniguchi Buson
THE PIERCING CHILL I FEEL
741(2)
T. S. Eliot
THE WINTER EVENING SETTLES DOWN
743(1)
Theodore Roethke
ROOT CELLAR
743(1)
Elizabeth Bishop
THE FISH
744(2)
Anne Stevenson
THE VICTORY
746(1)
John Haines
WINTER NEWS
747(1)
Emily Dickinson
A ROUTE OF EVANESCENCE
747(1)
Jean Toomer
REAPERS
748(1)
Gerard Manley Hopkins
PIED BEAUTY
748(1)
ABOUT HAIKU
749(2)
Arakida Moritake
THE FALLING FLOWER
749(1)
Matsuo Basho
HEAT-LIGHTNING STREAK
750(1)
Matsuo Basho
IN THE OLD STONE POOL
750(1)
Taniguchi Buson
ON THE ONE-TON TEMPLE BELL
750(1)
Taniguchi Buson
I GO
750(1)
Kobayashi Issa
ONLY ONE GUY
750(1)
Kobayashi Issa
CRICKET
750(1)
Richard Brautigan
HAIKU AMBULANCE
750(1)
Gary Snyder
Michael B. Stillman
Penny Harter
Jennifer Brutschy
Richard Wright
Hayden Carruth
John Ridland
Etheridge Knight
A SELECTION OF HAIKU
751(1)
FOR REVIEW AND FURTHER STUDY
751(5)
John Keats
BRIGHT STAR! WOULD I WERE STEADFAST AS THOU ART
751(1)
Walt Whitman
THE RUNNER
752(1)
T. E. Hulme
IMAGE
752(1)
William Carlos Williams
THE GREAT FIGURE
752(1)
Robert Bly
DRIVING TO TOWN LATE TO MAIL A LETTER
753(1)
Gary Snyder
MID-AUGUST AT SOURDOUGH MOUNTAIN LOOKOUT
753(1)
H.D.
HEAT
753(1)
Louise Gluck
MOCK ORANGE
754(1)
Billy Collins
EMBRACE
754(1)
Emily Grosholz
LETTER FROM GERMANY
755(1)
Stevie Smith
NOT WAVING BUT DROWNING
756(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Ezra Pound on Writing, THE IMAGE
756(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Analyzing Images
757(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
758(1)
STUDENT ESSAY Elizabeth Bishop's Use of Imagery in "The Fish"
758(5)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
763(1)
17 Figures of Speech
764(23)
WHY SPEAK FIGURATIVELY?
764(3)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
THE EAGLE
765(1)
William Shakespeare
SHALL I COMPARE THEE TO A SUMMER'S DAY?
765(1)
Howard Moss
SHALL I COMPARE THEE TO A SUMMER'S DAY?
766(1)
Jon Stallworthy
SINDHI WOMAN
767(1)
METAPHOR AND SIMILE
767(7)
Emily Dickinson
MY LIFE HAD STOOD--A LOADED GUN
769(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
FLOWER IN THE CRANNIED WALL
770(1)
William Blake
TO SEE A WORLD IN A GRAIN OF SAND
770(1)
Sylvia Plath
METAPHORS
770(1)
N. Scott Momaday
SIMILE
770(1)
Ruth Whitman
CASTOFF SKIN
770(2)
Emily Dickinson
IT DROPPED SO LOW--IN MY REGARD
772(1)
Craig Raine
A MARTIAN SENDS A POSTCARD HOME
772(2)
OTHER FIGURES
774(6)
James Stephens
THE WIND
775(2)
Chidiock Tichborne
ELEGY, WRITTEN WITH HIS OWN HAND
777(1)
Margaret Atwood
YOU FIT INTO ME
778(1)
John Ashbery
THE CATHEDRAL IS
778(1)
George Herbert
THE PULLEY
778(1)
Theodore Roethke
I KNEW A WOMAN
779(1)
FOR REVIEW AND FURTHER STUDY
780(4)
Robert Frost
THE SILKEN TENT
780(1)
Denise Levertov
LEAVING FOREVER
781(1)
Jane Kenyon
THE SUITOR
781(1)
Robert Frost
THE SECRET SITS
782(1)
W.S. Merwin
SONG OF MAN CHIPPING AN ARROWHEAD
782(1)
A.R. Ammons
COWARD
782(1)
Kay Ryan
TURTLE
782(1)
Robinson Jeffers
HANDS
783(1)
Robert Burns
OH, MY LOVE IS LIKE A RED, RED ROSE
783(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Robert Frost on Writing, THE IMPORTANCE OF POETIC METAPHOR
784(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How Metaphors Enlarge a Poem's Meaning
785(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
786(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
786(1)
18 Song
787(20)
SINGING AND SAYING
787(8)
Ben Jonson
TO CELIA
788(1)
Anonymous
THE CRUEL MOTHER
789(2)
Run D.M.C.
PETER PIPER
791(1)
William Shakespeare
TAKE, O, TAKE THOSE LIPS AWAY
792(1)
Edwin Arlington Robinson
RICHARD CORY
793(1)
Paul Simon
RICHARD CORY
794(1)
BALLADS
795(5)
Anonymous
BONNY BARBARA ALLAN
795(3)
Dudley Randall
BALLAD OF BIRMINGHAM
798(2)
BLUES
800(2)
Bessie Smith
Clarence Williams
JAILHOUSE BLUES
801(1)
W.H. Auden
FUNERAL BLUES
801(1)
FOR REVIEW AND FURTHER STUDY
802(2)
John Lennon
Paul McCartney
ELEANOR RIGBY
802(1)
Anonymous
THE SILVER SWAN, WHO LIVING HAD NO NOTE
803(1)
William Blake
JERUSALEM
803(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Paul McCartney on Writing, CREATING "ELEANOR RIGBY"
804(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Is There a Difference Between Poetry and Song?
805(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
806(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
806(1)
19 Sound
807(24)
SOUND AS MEANING
807(5)
Alexander Pope
TRUE EASE IN WRITING COMES FROM ART, NOT CHANCE
808(2)
William Butler Yeats
WHO GOES WITH FERGUS?
810(1)
John Updike
RECITAL
811(1)
Frances Cornford
THE WATCH
811(1)
William Wordsworth
A SLUMBER DID MY SPIRIT SEAL
812(1)
Emanuel di Pasquale
RAIN
812(1)
Aphra Behn
WHEN MAIDENS ARE YOUNG
812(1)
ALLITERATION AND ASSONANCE
812(4)
A.E. Housman
EIGHT O'CLOCK
814(1)
Robert Herrick
UPON JULIA'S VOICE
814(1)
Janet Lewis
GIRL HELP
815(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
THE SPLENDOR FALLS ON CASTLE WALLS
816(1)
RIME
816(8)
William Cole
ON MY BOAT ON LAKE CAYUGA
817(1)
William Blake
THE ANGEL THAT PRESIDED O'ER MY BIRTH
818(2)
Hilaire Belloc
THE HIPPOPOTAMUS
820(1)
Mark Jarman
UNHOLY SONNET: AFTER THE PRAYING
820(1)
William Butler Yeats
LEDA AND THE SWAN
821(1)
Gerard Manley Hopkins
GOD'S GRANDEUR
822(1)
Fred Chappell
NARCISSUS AND ECHO
823(1)
Robert Frost
DESERT PLACES
823(1)
READING AND HEARING POEMS OUT LOUD
824(4)
Michael Stillman
IN MEMORIAM JOHN COLTRANE
826(1)
William Shakespeare
FULL FATHOM FIVE THE FATHER LIES
826(1)
A.E. Housman
WITH RUE MY HEART IS LADEN
827(1)
T.S. Eliot
VIRGINIA
827(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE T.S. Eliot on Writing, THE MUSIC OF POETRY
828(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Is it Possible to Write About Sound?
829(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
830(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
830(1)
20 Rhythm
831(23)
STRESSES AND PAUSES
831(8)
Gwendolyn Brooks
WE REAL COOL
836(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
BREAK, BREAK, BREAK
836(1)
Ben Jonson
SLOW, SLOW, FRESH FOUNT, KEEP TIME WITH MY SALT TEARS
837(1)
Alexander Pope
ATTICUS
837(1)
Sir Thomas Wyatt
WITH SERVING STILL
838(1)
Dorothy Parker
RESUME
839(1)
METER
839(12)
Max Beerbohm
ON THE IMPRINT OF THE FIRST ENGLISH EDITION OF THE WORKS OF MAX BEERBOHM
840(5)
Thomas Campion
ROSE-CHEEKED LAURA, COME
845(1)
Walter Savage Landor
ON SEEING A HAIR OF LUCRETIA BORGIA
846(1)
Edna St. Vincent Millay
COUNTING-OUT RHYME
847(1)
A.E. Housman
WHEN I WAS ONE-AND-TWENTY
848(1)
William Carlos Williams
THE DESCENT OF WINTER
848(1)
Walt Whitman
BEAT! BEAT! DRUMS!
849(1)
David Mason
SONG OF THE POWERS
850(1)
Langton Hughes
DREAM BOOGIE
850(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Gwendolyn Brooks on Writing, HEARING "WE REAL COOL"
851(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Freeze-Framing the Sound
852(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
853(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
853(1)
21 Closed Form
854(25)
FORMAL PATTERNS
855(8)
John Keats
THIS LIVING HAND, NOW WARM AND CAPABLE
856(2)
Robert Graves
COUNTING THE BEATS
858(1)
John Donne
SONG ("GO AND CATCH A FALLING STAR")
859(1)
Phillis Levin
BRIEF BIO
860(1)
Ronald Gross
YIELD
861(2)
THE SONNET
863(5)
William Shakespeare
LET ME NOT TO THE MARRIAGE OF TRUE MINDS
863(1)
Michael Drayton
SINCE THERE'S NO HELP, COME LET US KISS AND PART
864(1)
Edna St. Vincent Millay
WHAT LIPS MY LIPS HAVE KISSED, AND WHERE, AND WHY
865(1)
Robert Frost
ACQUAINTED WITH THE NIGHT
865(1)
Kim Addonizio
FIRST POEM FOR YOU
866(1)
R.S. Gwynn
SCENES FROM THE PLAYROOM
867(1)
Timothy Steele
SUMMER
867(1)
Thomas Carper
FACTS
868(1)
THE EPIGRAM
868(4)
Alexander Pope
Martial, Sir John Harrington
Robert Herrick
William Blake
E.E. Cummings
Langston Hughes
J.V. Cunningham
John Frederick Nims
Stevie Smith
Thom Gunn
Brad Leithauser
Hilaire Belloc
Wendy Cope
A SELECTION OF EPIGRAMS
869-871(2)
W.H. Auden
Edmund Clerihew Bentley
Cornelius Ter Maat
CLERIHEWS
872(1)
OTHER FORMS
872(4)
Dylan Thomas
DO NOT GO GENTLE INTO THAT GOOD NIGHT
872(1)
Leigh Hunt
RONDEAU
873(1)
Robert Bridges
TRIOLET
874(1)
Elizabeth Bishop
SESTINA
874(2)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Robert Graves on Writing, POETIC INSPIRATION AND POETIC FORM
876(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Turning Points
877(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
878(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
878(1)
22 Open Form
879(23)
Denise Levertov
SIX VARIATIONS
879(4)
E.E. Cummings
BUFFALO BILL'S
883(1)
Emily Dickinson
VICTORY COMES LATE
884(1)
William Carlos Williams
THE DANCE
884(2)
Stephen Crane
THE HEART
886(1)
Walt Whitman
CAVALRY CROSSING A FORD
886(1)
Wallace Stevens
THIRTEEN WAYS OF LOOKING AT A BLACKBIRD
887(3)
Gary Gildner
FIRST PRACTICE
890(1)
Carolyn Forche
THE COLONEL
891(1)
VISUAL POETRY
892(4)
George Herbert
EASTER WINGS
892(1)
John Hollander
SWAN AND SHADOW
893(1)
Terry Ehret
from PAPYRUS
894(1)
Dorthi Charles
CONCRETE CAT
895(1)
SEEING THE LOGIC OF OPEN FORM
896(3)
E.E. Cummings
IN JUST
896(1)
Linda Pastan
JUMP CABLING
897(1)
Lucille Clifton
HOMAGE TO MY HIPS
897(1)
Carole Satyamurti
I SHALL PAINT MY NAILS RED
898(1)
Alice Fulton
WHAT I LIKE
898(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Walt Whitman on Writing, THE POETRY OF THE FUTURE
899(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Lining Up for Free Verse
900(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
900(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
901(1)
23 Symbol
902(17)
T.S. Eliot
THE Boston Evening Transcript
903(1)
Emily Dickinson
THE LIGHTNING IS A YELLOW FORK
904(2)
Thomas Hardy
NEUTRAL TONES
906(1)
Matthew 13:24-30
THE PARABLE OF THE GOOD SEED
907(1)
George Herbert
REDEMPTION
908(1)
John Ciardi
MOST LIKE AN ARCH THIS MARRIAGE
908(1)
Emily Dickinson
I HEARD A FLY BUZZ-WHEN I DIED
909(1)
Robert Frost
THE ROAD NOT TAKEN
910(1)
Christina Rossetti
UPHILL
911(1)
Gjertrud Schnackenberg
SIGNS
911(1)
FOR REVIEW AND FURTHER STUDY
912(4)
Robinson Jeffers
THE BEAKS OF EAGLES
912(1)
Sara Teasdale
THE FLIGHT
913(1)
William Carlos Williams
POEM ("AS THE CAT")
914(1)
Ted Kooser
CARRIE
914(1)
James Applewhite
THE STORY OF A DRAWER
915(1)
Lorine Niedecker
POPCORN-CAN COVER
915(1)
Wallace Stevens
ANECDOTE OF THE JAR
915(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE William Butler Yeats on Writing, POETIC SYMBOLS
916(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How to Read a Symbol
917(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
917(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
918(1)
24 Myth and Narrative
919(26)
Robert Frost
NOTHING GOLD CAN STAY
921(1)
D.H. Lawrence
BAVARIAN GENTIANS
922(1)
Thomas Hardy
THE OXEN
922(1)
William Wordsworth
THE WORLD IS TOO MUCH WITH US
923(1)
Louise Bogan
MEDUSA
924(1)
PERSONAL MYTH
925(3)
William Butler Yeats
THE SECOND COMING
925(1)
Dick Allen
NIGHT DRIVING
926(1)
James Dickey
THE HEAVEN OF ANIMALS
927(1)
MYTH AND POPULAR CULTURE
928(9)
Charles Martin
TAKEN UP
929(1)
Edward Field
CURSE OF THE CAT WOMAN
930(1)
A.D. Hope
IMPERIAL ADAM
931(2)
Robert Frost
NEVER AGAIN WOULD BIRDS' SONG BE THE SAME
933(1)
Anne Sexton
CINDERELLA
934(3)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Anne Sexton on Writing, TRANSFORMING FAIRY TALES
937(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Demystifying Myth
938(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
939(1)
STUDENT ESSAY The Bonds Between Love and Hatred in H.D.'s "Helen"
939(5)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
944(1)
25 Poetry and Personal Identity
945(22)
Sylvia Plath
LADY LAZARUS
946(3)
Julia Alvarez
THE WOMEN ON MY MOTHER'S SIDE WERE KNOWN
949(1)
RACE AND ETHNICITY
950(6)
Claude McKay
AMERICA
950(1)
Rita Dove
POEM IN WHICH I REFUSE CONTEMPLATION
951(2)
Samuel Menashe
THE SHRINE WHOSE SHAPE I AM
953(1)
Francisco X. Alarcon
THE X IN MY NAME
954(1)
Wendy Rose
FOR THE WHITE POETS WHO WOULD BE INDIAN
954(1)
Yusef Komunyakaa
FACING IT
955(1)
GENDER
956(3)
Anne Stevenson
SOUS-ENTENDU
957(1)
Lynne McMahon
THE LOST CHILD
957(1)
Donald Justice
MEN AT FORTY
958(1)
Adrienne Rich
WOMEN
959(1)
FOR REVIEW AND FURTHER STUDY
959(5)
Shirley Geok-lin Lim
TO LI PO
959(1)
Andrew Hudgins
ELEGY FOR MY FATHER, WHO IS NOT DEAD
960(1)
Judith Ortiz Cofer
QUINCEANERA
961(1)
Edna St. Vincent Millay
WELL, I HAVE LOST YOU; AND I LOST YOU FAIRLY
961(1)
Philip Larkin
AUBADE
962(2)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Julia Alvarez on Writing, DISCOVERING MY VOICE IN ENGLISH
964(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Poetic Voice and Personal Identity
965(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
966(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
966(1)
26 Alternatives
967(12)
TRANSLATIONS
967(6)
Pablo Neruda
MUCHOS SOMOS
968(1)
Pablo Neruda
Alastair Reid
WE ARE MANY
968(1)
Horace
ODE I
969(1)
Edwin Arlington Robinson
James Michie
John Frederick Nims
TRANSLATIONS FROM HORACE
970-971(1)
Omar Khayyam
RUBAI
972(1)
Edward FitzGerald
Robert Graves
Omar Ali-Shah
Dick Davis
TRANSLATIONS FROM OMAR KHAYYAM
972(1)
Octavio Paz
CON LOS OJOS CERRADOS
973(1)
Octavio Paz
John Felstiner
WITH OUR EYES SHUT
973(1)
PARODY
973(4)
Anonymous
WE FOUR LADS FROM LIVERPOOL ARE
973(1)
Wendy Cope
From STRUGNELL'S Rubaiyat
974(1)
Hugh Kingsmill
WHAT, STILL ALIVE AT TWENTY-TWO?
975(1)
Bruce Bennett
THE LADY SPEAKS AGAIN
975(1)
George Starbuck
MARGARET ARE YOU DRUG
976(1)
Gene Fehler
IF RICHARD LOVELACE BECAME A FREE AGENT
976(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Alastair Reid on Writing, TRANSLATING NERUDA
977(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Parody Is the Sincerest Form of Flattery
977(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
978(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
978(1)
27 Evaluating a Poem
979(30)
Anonymous
O MOON, WHEN I GAZE ON THE BEAUTIFUL FACE
981(1)
Grace Treasone
LIFE
981(1)
Stephen Tropp
MY WIFE IS MY SHIRT
982(1)
Emily Dickinson
A DYING TIGER--MOANED FOR DRINK
982(3)
Rod McKuen
THOUGHTS ON CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
985(1)
William Stafford
TRAVELING THROUGH THE DARK
986(1)
Julia A. Moore
LITTLE LIBBY
987(1)
Frederick Turner
ON THE DEATH OF AN INFANT
988(1)
Dabney Stuart
CRIB DEATH
988(1)
Terese Svoboda
ON MY FIRST SON
988(1)
Ted Kooser
A CHILD'S GRAVE MARKER
989(1)
Wallace McRae
REINCARNATION
989(2)
KNOWING EXCELLENCE
991(15)
William Butler Yeats
SAILING TO BYZANTIUM
991(3)
Arthur Guiterman
ON THE VANITY OF EARTHLY GREATNESS
994(1)
Percy Bysshe Shelley
OZYMANDIAS
994(1)
William Shakespeare
MY MISTRESS' EYES ARE NOTHING LIKE THE SUN
995(1)
Thomas Campion
THERE IS A GARDEN IN HER FACE
996(1)
May Swenson
FOUR-WORD LINES
996(2)
Walt Whitman
O CAPTAIN! MY CAPTAIN!
998(1)
Carl Sandburg
FOG
999(1)
Thomas Gray
ELEGY WRITTEN IN A COUNTRY CHURCHYARD
999(5)
Emma Lazarus
THE NEW COLOSSUS
1004(1)
Edgar Allan Poe
ANNABEL LEE
1005(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Edgar Allan Poe on Writing, A LONG POEM DOES NOT EXIST
1006(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY How to Begin Evaluating a Poem
1007(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
1008(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1008(1)
28 What Is Poetry?
1009(4)
Robert Francis
CATCH
1009(4)
29 Two Poets in Depth
1013(14)
EMILY DICKINSON BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
1013(5)
Emily Dickinson
SUCCESS IS COUNTED SWEETEST
1014(1)
Emily Dickinson
WILD NIGHTS--WILD NIGHTS!
1014(1)
Emily Dickinson
I FELT A FUNERAL, IN MY BRAIN
1014(1)
Emily Dickinson
I'M NOBODY! WHO ARE YOU?
1015(1)
Emily Dickinson
THE SOUL SELECTS HER OWN SOCIETY
1015(1)
Emily Dickinson
AFTER GREAT PAIN, A FORMAL FEELING COMES
1016(1)
Emily Dickinson
I STARTED EARLY--TOOK MY DOG
1016(1)
Emily Dickinson
BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP FOR DEATH
1017(1)
Emily Dickinson
SOME KEEP THE SABBATH GOING TO CHURCH
1017(1)
Emily Dickinson
TELL ALL THE TRUTH BUT TELL IT SLANT
1018(1)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Emily Dickinson on Writing, RECOGNIZING POETRY WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Emily Dickinson on Writing, RECOGNIZING POETRY
1018(1)
LANGSTON HUGHES BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
1019(6)
Langston Hughes
THE NEGRO SPEAKS OF RIVERS
1019(1)
Langston Hughes
MOTHER TO SON
1020(1)
Langston Hughes
THE WEARY BLUES
1020(1)
Langston Hughes
I, TOO
1021(1)
Langston Hughes
SONG FOR A DARK GIRL
1022(1)
Langston Hughes
ISLAND
1022(1)
Langston Hughes
SUBWAY RUSH HOUR
1022(1)
Langston Hughes
SLIVER
1023(1)
Langston Hughes
HARLEM [DREAM DEFERRED]
1023(1)
Langston Hughes
THEME FOR ENGLISH B
1023(2)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Langston Hughes on Writing, THE NEGRO ARTIST AND THE RACIAL MOUNTAIN
1025(1)
SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1026(1)
30 Poems for Further Reading
1027(138)
Anonymous
EDWARD
1028(1)
Anonymous
THE THREE RAVENS
1029(1)
Anonymous
THE TWA CORBIES
1030(1)
Anonymous
WESTERN WIND
1031(1)
Anonymous
LAST WORDS OF THE PROPHET (NAVAJO MOUNTAIN CHANT)
1031(1)
Matthew Arnold
DOVER BEACH
1031(1)
John Ashbery
AT NORTH FARM
1032(1)
Margaret Atwood
SIREN SONG
1033(1)
W. H. Auden
AS I WALKED OUT ONE EVENING
1034(3)
W. H. Auden
MUSEE DES BEAUX ARTS
1037(1)
Elizabeth Bishop
FILLING STATION
1037(2)
Elizabeth Bishop
ONE ART
1039(1)
William Blake
THE LAMB
1040(1)
William Blake
THE TYGER
1040(1)
William Blake
THE SICK ROSE
1041(1)
Louise Bogan
THE DREAM
1042(1)
Eavan Boland
ANOREXIC
1042(2)
Emily Bronte
LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP
1044(1)
Gwendolyn Brooks
THE MOTHER
1044(1)
Gwendolyn Brooks
A STREET IN BRONZEVILLE: SOUTHEAST CORNER
1045(1)
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
GRIEF
1046(1)
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
HOW DO I LOVE THEE? LET ME COUNT THE WAYS
1046(1)
Robert Browning
SOLILOQUY OF THE SPANISH CLOISTER
1047(2)
Geoffrey Chaucer
YOUR YEN TWO WOL SLEE ME SODENLY
1049(1)
G.K. Chesterton
THE DONKEY
1050(1)
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
KUBLA KHAN
1050(2)
E. E. Cummings
SOMEWHERE I HAVE NEVER TRAVELLED, GLADLY BEYOND
1052(1)
John Donne
DEATH BE NOT PROUD
1053(1)
John Donne
THE FLEA
1053(1)
John Donne
A VALEDICTION: FORBIDDING MOURNING
1054(2)
Rita Dove
DAYSTAR
1056(1)
John Dryden
TO THE MEMORY OF MR. OLDHAM
1057(1)
T. S. Eliot
JOURNEY OF THE MAGI
1057(2)
T. S. Eliot
THE LOVE SONG OF J. ALFRED PRUFROCK
1059(4)
Louise Erdrich
INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL: THE RUNAWAYS
1063(1)
Robert Frost
BIRCHES
1064(1)
Robert Frost
MENDING WALL
1065(2)
Robert Frost
STOPPING BY WOODS ON A SNOWY EVENING
1067(1)
Allen Ginsberg
A SUPERMARKET IN CALIFORNIA
1067(1)
Dana Gioia
CALIFORNIA HILLS IN AUGUST
1068(1)
Donald Hall
NAMES OF HORSES
1069(1)
Thomas Hardy
THE CONVERGENCE OF THE TWAIN
1070(2)
Thomas Hardy
DURING WIND AND RAIN
1072(1)
Thomas Hardy
HAP
1073(1)
Thomas Hardy
IN CHURCH
1074(1)
Robert Hayden
THOSE WINTER SUNDAYS
1074(1)
Robert Hayden
THE WHIPPING
1075(1)
H. D.
HELEN
1076(1)
Seamus Heaney
DIGGING
1077(1)
Seamus Heaney
MOTHER OF THE GROOM
1078(1)
Anthony Hecht
ADAM
1078(2)
George Herbert
LOVE
1080(1)
Robert Herrick
TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME
1081(1)
Garrett Hongo
THE GADENCE OF SILK
1081(2)
Gerard Manley Hopkins
SPRING AND FALL
1083(1)
Gerard Manley Hopkins
THOU ART INDEED JUST, LORD, IF I CONTEND
1083(1)
Manley Hopkins
THE WINDHOVER
1084(1)
A. E. Housman
LOVELIEST OF TREES, THE CHERRY NOW
1085(1)
A. E. Housman
TO AN ATHLETE DYING YOUNG
1085(1)
Randall Jarrell
THE DEATH OF THE BALL TURRET GUNNER
1086(1)
Randall Jarrell
NEXT DAY
1087(1)
Robinson Jeffers
TO THE STONE-CUTTERS
1088(1)
Ben Jonson
ON MY FIRST DAUGHTER
1089(1)
Ben Jonson
ON MY FIRST SON
1089(1)
Donald Justice
ON THE DEATH OF FRIENDS IN CHILDHOOD
1090(1)
John Keats
ODE ON A GRECIAN URN
1090(2)
John Keats
ON FIRST LOOKING INTO CHAPMAN'S HOMER
1092(1)
John Keats
WHEN I HAVE FEARS THAT I MAY CEASE TO BE
1093(1)
John Keats
TO AUTUMN
1093(2)
Philip Larkin
HOME IS SO SAD
1095(1)
Philip Larkin
POETRY OF DEPARTURES
1095(1)
Irving Layton
THE BULL CALF
1096(1)
Philip Levine
ANIMALS ARE PASSING FROM OUT LIVES
1097(1)
Stephen Shu-ning Liu
MY FATHER'S MARTIAL ART
1098(1)
Robert Lowell
SKUNK HOUR
1099(1)
Archibald MacLeish
THE END OF THE WORLD
1100(1)
Andrew Marvell
TO HIS COY MISTRESS
1101(1)
James Merrill
CHARLES ON FIRE
1102(1)
Charlotte Mew
THE FARMER'S BRIDE
1104(1)
Edna St. Vincent Millay
RECUERDO
1104(1)
John Milton
METHOUGHT I SAW MY LATE ESPOUSED SAINT
1105(1)
John Milton
WHEN I CONSIDER HOW MY LIGHT IS SPENT
1106(1)
Marianne Moore
THE MIND IS AN ENCHANTING THING
1106(2)
Frederick Morgan
THE MASTER
1108(1)
Howard Nemerov
THE WAR IN THE AIR
1108(1)
Lorine Niedecker
SORROW MOVES IN WIDE WAVES
1109(1)
Naomi Shihab Nye
FAMOUS
1110(1)
Sharon Olds
THE ONE GIRL AT THE BOYS' PARTY
1111(1)
Wilfred Owen
ANTHEM FOR DOOMED YOUTH
1111(1)
Linda Pastan
ETHICS
1112(1)
Robert Phillips
RUNNING ON EMPTY
1113(1)
Sylvia Plath
DADDY
1114(2)
Edgar Allan Poe
TO HELEN
1116(1)
Alexander Pope
A LITTLE LEARNING IS A DANG'ROUS THING
1117(1)
Ezra Pound
THE GARRET
1118(1)
Ezra Pound
THE RIVER-MERCHANT'S WIFE: A LETTER
1118(1)
Wyatt Prunty
THE STARLINGS
1119(1)
Dudley Randall
A DIFFERENT IMAGE
1120(1)
John Crowe Ransom
BELLS FOR JOHN WHITESIDE'S DAUGHTER
1121(1)
Henry Reed
NAMING OF PARTS
1121(1)
Alastair Reid
SPEAKING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE
1122(1)
Adrienne Rich
PEELING ONIONS
1123(1)
Adrienne Rich
POWER
1123(1)
Edwin Arlington Robinson
MINIVER CHEEVY
1124(2)
Theodore Roethke
ELEGY FOR JANE
1126(1)
Mary Jo Salter
WELCOME TO HIROSHIMA
1127(1)
William Shakespeare
NOT MARBLE NOR THE GILDED MONUMENTS
1128(1)
William Shakespeare
THAT TIME OF YEAR THOU MAYST IN ME BEHOLD
1129(1)
William Shakespeare
WHEN, IN DISGRACE WITH FORTUNE AND MEN'S EYES
1129(1)
William Shakespeare
WHEN DAISIES PIED AND VIOLETS BLUE
1130(1)
William Shakespeare
WHEN ICICLES HANG BY THE WALL
1131(1)
Charles Simic
BUTCHER SHOP
1131(1)
David R. Slavitt
TITANIC
1132(1)
Christopher Smart
FOR I WILL CONSIDER MY CAT JEOFFRY
1132(3)
William Jay Smith
AMERICAN PRIMITIVE
1135(1)
W. D. Snodgrass
DISPOSAL
1135(1)
Cathy Song
STAMP COLLECTING
1136(1)
William Stafford
AT THE KLAMATH BERRY FESTIVAL
1137(1)
Wallace Stevens
PETER QUINCE AT THE CLAVIER
1138(3)
Wallace Stevens
THE EMPEROR OF ICE-CREAM
1141(1)
Ruth Stone
SECOND HAND COAT
1141(1)
Jonathan Swift
A DESCRIPTION OF THE MORNING
1142(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
DARK HOUSE, BY WHICH ONCE MORE I STAND
1142(1)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
ULYSSES
1143(2)
Dyland Thomas
FERN HILL
1145(2)
John Updike
EX-BASKETBALL PLAYER
1147(1)
Amy Uyematsu
RED ROOSTER, YELLOW SKY
1148(1)
Mona Van Duyn
EARTH TREMORS FELT IN MISSOURI
1148(1)
Derek Walcott
THE VIRGINS
1149(1)
Edmund Waller
GO, LOVELY ROSE
1150(1)
Walt Whitman
A NOISELESS PATIENT SPIDER
1151(1)
Walt Whitman
I SAW IN LOUISIANA A LIVE-OAK GROWING
1151(1)
Richard Wilbur
THE WRITER
1152(1)
Miller Williams
THINKING ABOUT BILL, DEAD OF AIDS
1153(1)
William Carlos Williams
SPRING AND ALL
1154(1)
William Carlos Williams
TO WAKEN AN OLD LADY
1155(1)
Yvor Winters
AT THE SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT
1156(1)
William Wordsworth
COMPOSED UPON WESTMINSTER BRIDGE
1157(1)
James Wright
A BLESSING
1158(1)
James Wright
AUTUMN BEGINS IN MARTINS FERRY, OHIO
1159(1)
Mary Sidney Wroth
IN THIS STRANGE LABYRINTH
1159(1)
Sir Thomas Wyatt
THEY FLEE FROM ME THAT SOMETIME DID ME SEKE
1160(1)
William Butler Yeats
CRAZY JANE TALKS WITH THE BISHOP
1161(1)
William Butler Yeats
LONG-LEGGED FLY
1162(1)
William Butler Yeats
THE MAGI
1163(1)
William Butler Yeats
WHEN YOU ARE OLD
1163(2)
31 Lives of the Poets
1165(30)
DRAMA 1195(654)
32 Reading a Play
1197(54)
A PLAY IN ITS ELEMENTS
1199(15)
Susan Glaspell
TRIFLES Was Minnie Wright to blame for the death of her husband? While the menfolk try to unravel a mystery, two women in the kitchen turn up revealing clues.
1199(15)
TRAGEDY AND COMEDY
1214(29)
John Millington Synge
RIDERS TO THE SEA From her island home off the west coast of Ireland, Maurya has already lost seven loved ones to the sea. How can she stop her youngest son from venturing forth?
1215(12)
David Ives
SURE THING Bill wants to pick up Betty in a cafe, but he makes every mistake in the book. Luckily, he not only gets a second chance, but a third and a fourth as well.
1227(10)
Garrison Keillor
PRODIGAL SON Wally is tried of working on the family farm. He asks his dad for his share of the business and sets off to party with predictably awful results in this comic retelling of the Gospel story.
1237(6)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Susan Glaspell on Drama, CREATING Trifles
1243(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Conflict Resolution
1244(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
1245(1)
STUDENT ESSAY Outside Trifles
1245(5)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1250(1)
33 The Theater of Sophocles
1251(50)
Sophocles
DUDLEY FITTS
ROBERT FITZGERALD
OEDIPUS THE KING "Who is the man proclaimed / by Delphi's prophetic rock / as the bloody handed murderer, / the doer of deeds that none dare name? / ...Terribly close on his heels are the Fates that never miss."
1254(41)
ARISTOTLE'S CONCEPT OF TRAGEDY
1295(2)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Aristotle on Drama, DEFINING TRAGEDY
1297(2)
WRITING CRITICALLY Some Things Change, Some Things Don't
1299(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
1300(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1300(1)
34 The Theater of Shakespeare
1301(109)
William Shakespeare
THE TRAGEDY OF OTHELLO, THE MOOR OF VENICE Here is a story of jealousy, that "green-eyed monster which doth mock / The meat it feeds on"--of a passionate, suspicious man and his blameless wife, of a serpent masked as a friend.
1303(99)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE W. H. Auden on Drama, IAGO AS A TRIUMPHANT VILLAIN
1402(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY Breaking the Language Barrier
1403(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
1403(1)
STUDENT ESSAY Othello: Tragedy or Soap Opera?
1403(6)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1409(1)
The Modern Theater
1410(76)
REALISM AND NATURALISM
1410(60)
Henrik Ibsen
JAMES MCFARLANE
A DOLL'S HOUSE The founder of modern drama portrays a troubled marriage. Helmer, the bank manager, regards his wife Nora as a chuckleheaded pet--not knowing the truth may shatter his smug world.
1413(57)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE George Bernard Shaw on Drama, ISBEN AND THE FAMILIAR SITUATION
1470(4)
TRAGICOMEDY AND THE ABSURD
1474(5)
Edward Albee
THE SANDBOX Mommy and Daddy have a nasty surprise in store for Grandma in this dark absurdist comedy.
1474(5)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Edward Albee on Drama, THE THEATER OF THE ABSURD
1479(1)
WRITING CRITICALLY What's so Realistic About Realism?
1480(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
1481(1)
STUDENT ESSAY Helmer vs. Helmer
1481(3)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1484(2)
36 Evaluating a Play
1486(4)
WRITING CRITICALLY Critical Performance
1487(1)
WRITING ASSIGNMENT
1488(1)
FURTHER SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1488(2)
37 Plays for Further Reading
1490(272)
Sophocles
DUDLEY FITTS
ROBERT FITZGERALD
ANTIGONE In one of the great plays of classical Greek drama, a daughter of Oedipus strives to give the body of her slain brother a proper burial. Soon she finds herself in conflict with a king.
1491(30)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Robert Fitzgerald on Drama, TRANSLATING SOPHOCLES
1521(1)
William Shakespeare
THE TRAGEDY OF HAMLET, PRINCE OF DENMARK In perhaps the most celebrated play in English, a ghost demands that prince Hamlet avenge his father's "most foul and unnatural murder." But how can Hamlet be sure that the apparition is indeed his father's spirit?
1522(112)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Anthony Burgess on Drama, AN ASIAN CULTURE LOOKS AT SHAKESPEARE
1634(2)
Arthur Miller
DEATH OF A SALESMAN Willy Loman has bright dreams for himself and his two sons, but he is an aging salesman whose only assets are a shoeshine and a smile. A modern classic about the downfall of an ordinary American.
1636(71)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Arthur Miller on Drama, TRAGECY AND THE COMMON MAN
1707(3)
Tennessee Williams
THE GLASS MENAGERIE Painfully shy and retiring, shunning love, Laura dwells in a world as fragile as her collection of tiny figurines--until one memorable night a gentleman comes to call.
1710(49)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Tennessee Williams on Drama, HOW TO STAGE The Glass Menagerie
1759(3)
38 New Voices in American Drama
1762(87)
David Henry Hwang
THE SOUND OF A VOICE A strange man arrives at a solitary woman's home in the remote country-side. As they fall in love, they discover disturbing secrets about one another's past.
1762(15)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE
1777(4)
David Henry Hwang on Drama, MULTICULTURAL THEATER
1777(1)
Terrence McNally
ANDRE'S MOTHER After Andre's funeral the four people who loved him most walk into Central Park together. Three of them talk about their grief, but Andre's mother remains silent about her son, dead of AIDS.
1778(3)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE
1781(15)
Terrence McNally on Drama, HOW TO WRITE A PLAY
1781(1)
Milcha Sanchez-Scott
THE CUBAN SWIMMER Nineteen-year-old Margarita Suarez wants to win a Southern California distance swimming race. Is her family behind her? Quite literally!
1782(14)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE Milcha Sanchez-Scott on Drama, WRITING The Cuban Swimmer
1796(50)
August Wilson
JOE TURNER'S COME AND GONE When Herald Loomis turns up at Seth Holly's boardinghouse, he arouses suspicion. And why is the voodoo man out in the garden burying a pigeon and praying over its blood?
1797(49)
WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE August Wilson on Drama, BLACK EXPERIENCE IN AMERICA
1846(3)
WRITING 1849(132)
39 Writing About Literature
1851(23)
BEGINNING
1851(2)
DISCOVERING AND PLANNING
1853(2)
DRAFTING AND REVISING
1855(3)
THE FORM OF YOUR FINISHED PAPER
1858(1)
DOCUMENTING YOUR SOURCES
1859(7)
REFERENCE GUIDE FOR CITATIONS
1866(6)
KEEPING A JOURNAL
1872(1)
Robert Wallace
THE GIRL WRITING HER ENGLISH PAPER
1873(1)
40 Writing About a Story
1874(18)
EXPLICATING
1874(1)
STUDENT ESSAY (EXPLICATION)
1875(4)
ANALYZING
1879(1)
STUDENT ESSAY (ANALYSIS)
1880(4)
STUDENT CARD REPORT
1884(2)
COMPARING AND CONTRASTING
1886(2)
SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1888(4)
41 Writing About a Poem
1892(21)
EXPLICATING
1893(1)
Robert Frost
DESIGN
1894(1)
STUDENT ESSAY (EXPLICATION)
1894(5)
ANALYZING
1899(1)
STUDENT ESSAY (ANALYSIS)
1900(2)
COMPARING AND CONSTRASTING
1902(1)
Abbie Huston Evans
WING-SPREAD
1902(1)
STUDENT ESSAY (COMPARISON AND CONTRAST)
1903(2)
HOW TO QUOTE A POEM
1905(3)
BEFORE YOU BEGIN
1908(1)
SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1909(2)
Robert Frost
IN WHITE (EARLY DRAFT OF DESIGN)
1911(2)
42 Writing About a Play
1913(13)
METHODS
1913(2)
HOW TO QUOTE A PLAY
1915(1)
WRITING A CARD REPORT
1916(2)
STUDENT CARD REPORT
1918(2)
REVIEWING A PLAY
1920(1)
STUDENT DRAMA REVIEW
1921(2)
SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING
1923(3)
43 Writing and Researching on the Computer
1926(5)
WRITING AND REVISING
1926(1)
USING SPELL-CHECK PROGRAMS
1927(1)
RESEARCHING ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB
1927(2)
TWO WAYS TO START RESEARCHING
1929(1)
PLAGIARISM
1930(1)
LITERATURE ONLINE
1930(1)
44 Critical Approaches to Literature
1931(50)
FORMALIST CRITICISM
1932(5)
Cleanth Brooks
THE FORMALIST CRITIC
1933(1)
Michael Clark
LIGHT AND DARKNESS IN "SONNY'S BLUES"
1934(1)
Robert Langbaum
ON ROBERT BROWNING'S "MY LAST DUCHESS"
1935(2)
BIOGRAPHICAL CRITICISM
1937(5)
Leslie Fielder
THE RELATIONSHIP OF POET AND POEM
1938(1)
Virginia Llewellyn Smith
CHEKHOV'S ATTITUDE TO ROMANTIC LOVE
1939(2)
Brett C. Millier
ON ELIZABETH BISHOP'S "ONE ART"
1941(1)
HISTORICAL CRITICISM
1942(5)
Hugh Kenner
IMAGISM
1943(1)
Sally Fitzgerald
SOUTHERN SOURCES OF "A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND"
1944(2)
Darryl Pinckney
ON LANGSTON HUGHES
1946(1)
PSYCHOLOGICAL CRITICISM
1947(4)
Sigmund Freud
THE DESTINY OF OEDIPUS
1948(1)
Daniel Hoffman
THE FATHER-FIGURE IN "THE TELL-TALE HEART"
1949(1)
Harold Bloom
POETIC INFLUENCE
1950(1)
MYTHOLOGICAL CRITICISM
1951(4)
Northrop Frye
MYTHIC ARCHETYPES
1952(1)
Edmond Volpe
MYTH IN FAULKNER'S "BARN BURNING"
1952(2)
Maud Bodkin
LUCIFER IN SHAKESPEARE'S Othello
1954(1)
SOCIOLOGICAL CRITICISM
1955(4)
Georg Lukacs
CONTENT DETERMINES FORM
1956(1)
Daniel P. Watkins
MONEY AND LABOR IN "THE ROCKING-HORSE WINNER"
1956(2)
Alfred Kazin
WALT WHITMAN AND ABRAHAM LINCOLN
1958(1)
GENDER CRITICISM
1959(4)
Elaine Showalter
TOWARD A FEMINIST POETICS
1960(1)
Juliann Fleenor
GENDER AND PATHOLOGY IN "THE YELLOW WALL-PAPER"
1961(1)
Sandra M. Gilbert
Susan Gubar
THE FREEDOM OF EMILY DISKINSON
1962(1)
READER-RESPONSE CRITICISM
1963(5)
Stanley Fish
AN ESKIMO "A ROSE FOR EMILY"
1964(1)
Robert Scholes
"HOW DO WE MAKE A POEM?"
1965(2)
Joel Wingard
FILLING THE GAPS IN Hamlet
1967(1)
DECONSTRUCTIONIST CRITICISM
1968(4)
Roland Barthes
THE DEATH OF THE AUTHOR
1969(1)
Barbara Johnson
RIGOROUS UNRELIABILITY
1969(2)
Geoffrey Hartman
ON WORDSWORTH'S "A SLUMBER DID MY SPIRIT SEAL"
1971(1)
CULTURAL STUDIES
1972(9)
Vincent B. Leitch
POSTSTRUCTURALIST CULTURAL CRITIQUE
1974(1)
Mark Bauerlein
WHAT IS CULTURAL STUDIES?
1975(1)
Heather Glen
THE STANCE OF OBSERVATION IN WILLIAM BLAKE'S "LONDON"
1976(5)
Acknowledgments 1981(14)
Index of Major Themes 1995(8)
Index of First Lines of Poetry 2003(8)
Index of Authors and Titles 2011
Index of Literary Terms (inside back cover)


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