9780199267804

Making a New Man Ciceronian Self-Fashioning in the Rhetorical Works

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780199267804

  • ISBN10:

    0199267804

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2005-05-12
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Summary

In Making a New Man John Dugan investigates how Cicero (106-43 BCE) uses his major treatises on rhetorical theory (De oratore, Brutus, and Orator) in order to construct himself as a new entity within Roman cultural life: a leader who based his authority upon intellectual, oratorical, and literary accomplishments instead of the traditional avenues for prestige such as a distinguished familial pedigree or political or military feats. Eschewing conventional Roman notions of manliness, Cicero constructed a distinctly aesthetized identity that flirts with the questionable domains of the theatre and the feminine, and thus fashioned himself as a "new man."

Author Biography


John Dugan is Assistant Professor in the Classics Department, State University of New York at Buffalo.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1(14)
Scope and Methodology
15(6)
Epideixis, Textuality, and Self-Fashioning in the Pro Archia and In Pisonem
21(54)
The Archaeology of Epideictic and Roman Cultural Anxieties
24(7)
The Pro Archia as Epideictic Oration: the Construction of a Self
31(9)
The Pro Archia as Pre-Mortem Laudatio Funebris
40(3)
The Corruptibility of the Written Word and the Failure of the Pro Archia
43(4)
The Letter to Lucceius, Ornatus, and the Fight for Textual Fixity
47(8)
The In Pisonem and Pro Archia
55(3)
Piso as False Consul, an Anti-Cicero
58(8)
Conclusion: The Power and Limitations of Literary Ingenium
66(9)
Fashioning the Ideal Orator: Theatricality and Transgressive Aesthetics in the De oratore
75(97)
`Writing' the Ideal Orator
81(23)
Julius Caesar Strabo and Cicero's Self-Fashioning through Transgressive Aesthetics
104(43)
Body and Style: Putting the Ideal Orator Together
147(22)
Conclusion: Hortensius?
169(3)
The Brutus: Cicero's `Rhetorical' History
172(79)
Caesarian Intertexts
177(12)
History, Irony, and Autobiography in the Brutus
189(44)
Varieties of Virtus: Brutus in the Brutus
233(15)
Conclusion: Ambiguous Teleologies
248(3)
The Orator: Fashioning a Ciceronian Sublime
251(82)
The Orator's Intellectual, Personal, and Political Contexts
253(14)
Style and the Self, Text and the Body
267(22)
Making Your Mark: Written Ingenium in the Brutus and Orator
289(26)
Conclusion: Cicero and Demosthenes in `Longinus': The Ciceronian Sublime
315(18)
Afterword 333(17)
References 350(17)
Index of Ancient Sources 367(16)
General Index 383

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