CART

(0) items

The Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures, A Concise History, Volume I: To 1740,9780312439453

The Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures, A Concise History, Volume I: To 1740

by ; ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780312439453

ISBN10:
0312439458
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/28/2006
Publisher(s):
Bedford/St. Martin's
List Price: $58.25

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$17.48

Hurry!

Only two copies
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780312439453
$1.00

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 7/28/2006.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • The Making of the West: A Concise History, Volume I Peoples and Cultures
    The Making of the West: A Concise History, Volume I Peoples and Cultures




Summary

Praised for its highly readable narrative and unmatched integration of political, social and cultural history,The Making of the West: A Concise Historycaptures the spirit of each age as it situates Europe within a global context. The rich narrative pays sustained attention to important topics and developments over time and reveals the cross-cultural interactions that have shaped today's world, presenting the history of the West as an ongoing process. The text's hallmark global perspective, broad geographic coverage, new student study aids, and handy format are combined with the best full-color art and map programs of any brief text.

Author Biography

LYNN HUNT, Eugen Weber Professor of Modern European History at University of California at Los Angeles, received her B.A. from Carleton College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. She is the author of Revolution and Urban Politics in Provincial France (1978), Politics, Culture, and Class in the French Revolution (1984), and The Family Romance of the French Revolution (1992); she is also the co-author of Telling the Truth About History (1994), co-author of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution (2001, with CD-ROM), editor of The New Cultural History (1989), editor and translator of The French Revolution and Human Rights (1996), and co-editor of Histories: French Constructions of the Past (1995), Beyond the Cultural Turn (1999), and Human Rights and Revolutions (2000). She has been awarded fellowships by the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served as president of the American Historical Association in 2002.

THOMAS R. MARTIN, Jeremiah O'Connor Professor in Classics at the College of the Holy Cross, earned his B.A. at Princeton University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Harvard University. He is the author of Sovereignty and Coinage in Classical Greece (1985) and Ancient Greece (1996, 2000) and one of the originators of Perseus 1.0: Interactive Sources and Studies on Ancient Greece (1992, 1996, and www.perseus.tufts.edu). He serves on the editorial board of STOA (www.stoa.org) and as co-director of its DEMOS project (on-line resources on ancient Athenian democracy). A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies, he is currently conducting research on the comparative historiography of ancient Greece and ancient China.

BARBARA H. ROSENWEIN, professor of history at Loyola University of Chicago, earned her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Rhinoceros Bound: Cluny in the Tenth Century (1982), To Be the Neighbor of Saint Peter: The Social Meaning of Cluny's Property, 909-1049 (1989), Negotiating Space: Power, Restraint, and Privileges of Immunity in Early Medieval Europe (1999), and A Short History of the Middle Ages (2001). She is the editor of Anger's Past: The Social Uses of an Emotion in the Middle Ages (1998) and co-editor ofDebating the Middle Ages: Issues and Readings (1998) and Monks and Nuns, Saints and Outcasts: Religion in Medieval Society (2000). A recipient of Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, she is currently working on a history of emotions in the Early Middle Ages.

R. Po-CHIA HSIA, Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History at Pennsylvania State University, received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University. He is the author of Society and Religion in Munster, 1535-1618 (1984), The Myth of Ritual Murder: Jews and Magic in Reformation Germany (1988), Social Discipline in the Reformation: Central Europe 1550-1750 (1989), Trent 1475: Stories of a Ritual Murder Trial (1992), and The World of the Catholic Renewal (1997). He has edited The German People and the Reformation (1998), In and Out of the Ghetto: Jewish-Gentile Relations in Late Medieval and Early Modern Germany(1995), Calvinism and Religious Toleration in the Dutch Golden Age (2002), and A Companion to the Reformation World (2004). He has been awarded fellowships by the Woodrow Wilson International Society of Scholars, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Davis Center of Princeton University, the Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the American Academy in Berlin. Currently he is working on the cultural contacts between Europe and Asia between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries.

BONNIE G. SMITH, Board of Governors Professor of History at Rutgers University, earned her B.A. at Smith College and her Ph.D. at the University of Rochester. She is the author of Ladies of the Leisure Class (1981), Confessions of a Concierge: Madame Lucie's History of Twentieth-Century France (1985), Changing Lives: Women in European History Since 1700 (1989), The Gender of History: Men, Women and Historical Practice (1998), and Imperialism (2000); she is also the co-author and translator of What Is Property? (1994), editor of Global Feminisms Since 1945 (2000), and Women's History in Global Perspective(3 vols. 2004-2005), co-editor of History and the Texture of Modern Life: Selected Writings of Lucy Maynard Salmon (2001), Gendering Disability (2004), and Sources of the Medieval and Early Modern World (2005); and general editor of the forthcoming Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History. She has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Humanities Center, the Davis Center of Princeton University, and the American Council of Learned Societies. Currently she is studying the globalization of European culture since the seventeenth century.

Table of Contents

Preface v
Brief Contents xiv
Maps and Figures xxx
Authors' Note: The B.C.E/C.E. Dating System xxxiv
About the Authors xxxvii
Foundations of Western Civilization, to 500 B.C.E. 3(48)
Making Civilization, to 1000 B.C.E.
5(10)
Paleolithic and Neolithic Life, c. 400,000-4000 B.C.E.
5(3)
The Birth of Cities and Empire in Mesopotamia, c. 4000-1000 B.C.E.
8(5)
Mesopotamian Legacies: Commerce, Law, and Learning, c. 2200-1000 B.C.E.
13(2)
Early Civilizations in Egypt, the Levant, and Anatolia, c. 3100-1000 B.C.E.
15(10)
Religion and Rule in Egypt, c. 3100-2190 B.C.E.
16(5)
Life in the Egyptian and Hittite Kingdoms, 2190-1000 B.C.E.
21(4)
Shifting Empires in the Ancient Near East, to 500 B.C.E.
25(8)
From Neo-Assyrian to Babylonian to Persian Empire, c. 900-500 B.C.E.
26(4)
Creating Hebrew Monotheism, c. 1000-539 B.C.E.
30(3)
Greek Civilization, to 750 B.C.E.
33(5)
Minoan and Mycenaean Civilization, c. 2200-1000 B.C.E.
33(3)
The Greek Dark Age, c. 1000-750 B.C.E.
36(2)
Remaking Greek Civilization, c. 750-500 B.C.E.
38(10)
Citizenship and Freedom in the City-State
39(6)
New Ways of Thought and Expression
45(3)
Conclusion
48(3)
The Greek Golden Age, c. 500-400 B.C.E. 51(40)
The Persian Wars, 499-479 B.C.E.
52(4)
The Ionian Revolt and the Battle of Marathon, 499-490 B.C.E.
52(2)
Xerxes' Invasion of 480-479 B.C.E.
54(2)
Athenian Confidence in the Golden Age, 479-431 B.C.E.
56(9)
The Establishment of the Athenian Empire, 479c. 460 B.C.E.
56(3)
Radical Democracy and Pericles' Leadership, 461-445 B.C.E.
59(2)
The Urban Landscape of Golden Age Athens
61(4)
Tradition and Innovation in Athens's Golden Age
65(18)
Religious Tradition in a Period of Change
66(2)
Women, Slaves, and Metics in Traditional Society
68(5)
Education and Intellectual Innovation
73(6)
The Development of Tragedy and Comedy
79(4)
The End of the Golden Age, 431-403 B.C.E
83(5)
The Peloponnesian War, 431-403 B.C.E.
84(2)
The Rule of the Thirty Tyrants, 404-403 B.C.E.
86(2)
Conclusion
88(3)
From the Classical to the Hellenistic World, c. 400-30 B.C.E. 91(38)
Disunity in Classical Greece, c. 400-350 B.C.E.
93(6)
The Aftermath of War and the Trial of Socrates
93(2)
The Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle
95(3)
The Fracturing of Greece
98(1)
The Rise of Macedonia, 359-323 B.C.E.
99(7)
Philip II and the Background of Macedonian Power
99(3)
Exploits of Alexander the Great, 336-323 B.C.E.
102(4)
The Hellenistic Kingdoms, 323-30 B.C.E.
106(6)
The Structure of Hellenistic Kingdoms
106(4)
Hierarchy in Hellenistic Society
110(2)
Hellenistic Culture
112(13)
The Arts under Royal Support
112(3)
Philosophy for a New Age
115(3)
Innovation in the Sciences
118(2)
A New East-West Culture
120(5)
Conclusion
125(4)
The Rise of Rome, c. 753-44 B.C.E. 129(42)
Social and Religious Traditions
131(8)
Roman Values
131(1)
The Patron-Client System
132(2)
The Roman Family
134(2)
Education for Public Life
136(1)
Religion for Public and Private Interests
137(2)
From Monarchy to Republic, c. 753-287 B.C.E.
139(7)
Rule by Kings, c. 753-509 B.C.E.
140(2)
The Early Roman Republic, 509-287 B.C.E.
142(4)
Consequences of Roman Imperialism, Fifth to Second Centuries B.C.E.
146(12)
Roman Expansion in Italy
147(1)
Wars with Carthage
148(4)
Greece's Influence on Rome's Literature, Philosophy, and Art
152(4)
Imperialism's Effects on Republican Society
156(2)
The Destruction of the Republic, c. 133-44 B.C.E.
158(10)
The Gracchus Brothers and Political Rupture
159(1)
Gaius Marius and the First Client Armies
160(1)
Sulla and Civil War
161(2)
Pompey, Caesar, and the End of the Republic
163(5)
Conclusion
168(3)
The Roman Empire, c. 44 B.c.E.-284 C.E. 171(42)
Creating "Roman Peace"
173(11)
From Republic to Principate, 44-27 B.C.E.
173(1)
Augustus's "Restoration," 27 B.C.E.-14 C.E.
174(3)
Life in Augustan Rome
177(5)
Art and Literature to Please the Emperor
182(2)
Maintaining "Roman Peace"
184(11)
Making Monarchy Permanent, 14-180 C.E.
185(4)
Life under the Five Good Emperors, 96-180 C.E.
189(6)
The Emergence of Christianity
195(10)
The Teachings of Jesus
196(3)
Growth of a New Religion
199(3)
Competing Beliefs
202(3)
The Crisis of the Third Century
205(5)
Defending the Frontiers
205(1)
The Severan Emperors and Catastrophe
206(4)
Conclusion
210(3)
The Transformation of the Roman Empire, c. 284c. 600 C.E. 213(46)
Reorganizing the Empire
214(8)
Imperial Reform and Fragmentation
215(4)
Financial Reform and Social Consequences
219(1)
Religious Reform: From Persecution to Conversion
220(2)
Christianizing the Empire
222(13)
The Spread of Christianity
222(5)
Competing Visions of Religious Truth
227(5)
The Beginning of Christian Monasticism
232(3)
Non-Roman Kingdoms in the West
235(10)
Migrations into the Empire
235(8)
Mixing Traditions
243(2)
The Byzantine Empire in the East
245(10)
Byzantine Society
245(4)
The Reign of Justinian, 527-565
249(3)
Preserving Classical Literature
252(3)
Conclusion
255(4)
The Heirs of the Roman Empire, 600-750 259(36)
Byzantium: A Christian Empire under Siege
260(8)
Wars on the Frontiers, c. 570-750
261(2)
From an Urban to a Rural Way of Life
263(3)
Religion, Politics, and Iconoclasm
266(2)
Islam: A New Religion and a New Empire
268(7)
The Rise and Development of Islam, c. 610-632
268(5)
Muhammad's Successors, 632-750
273(1)
Peace and Prosperity in Islamic Lands
274(1)
The Western Kingdoms
275(17)
Frankish Kingdoms with Roman Roots
276(4)
Economic Activity in a Peasant Society
280(2)
The Powerful in Merovingian Society
282(4)
Christianity and Classical Culture in the British Isles
286(2)
Unity in Spain, Division in Italy
288(4)
Conclusion
292(3)
Unity and Diversity in Three Societies, 750-1050 295(44)
Byzantium: Renewed Strength and Influence
296(7)
Imperial Might
297(2)
The Macedonian Renaissance, c. 870c. 1025
299(2)
New States under the Influence of Byzantium
301(2)
From Unity to Fragmentation in the Islamic World
303(6)
The Abbasid Caliphate, 750c. 950
304(1)
Regional Diversity
305(2)
The Islamic Renaissance, c. 790c. 1050
307(2)
The Creation and Division of a New Western Empire
309(14)
The Rise of the Carolingians
310(1)
Charlemagne and His Kingdom, 768-814
311(3)
The Carolingian Renaissance
314(1)
Charlemagne's Successors, 814-911
315(2)
Land and Power
317(1)
Vikings, Muslims, and Magyars Invade
318(5)
The Emergence of Local Rule in the Post-Carolingian Age
323(13)
Public Power and Private Relationships
323(4)
War and Peace
327(2)
Political Communities in Italy, England, and France
329(3)
Emperors and Kings in Central and Eastern Europe
332(4)
Conclusion
336(3)
Renewal and Reform, 1050-1200 339(46)
The Commercial Revolution
340(6)
Centers of Commerce and Commercial Life
340(3)
Business Arrangements
343(2)
Self-Government for the Towns
345(1)
Church Reform and Its Aftermath
346(12)
Beginnings of the Reform Movement
346(3)
Gregorian Reform and the Investiture Conflict, 1073-1085
349(2)
The Sweep of Reform
351(1)
Early Crusades and Crusader States
352(4)
The Jews as Strangers
356(2)
The Revival of Monarchies
358(11)
Byzantium in Its Prime
359(1)
Norman and Angevin England
360(5)
Praising the King of France
365(1)
Remaking the Empire
366(1)
The Courtly Culture of Europe
367(2)
New Forms of Scholarship and Religious Experience
369(13)
Schools, Scholars, and the New Learning
370(3)
Benedictine Monks and Artistic Splendor
373(2)
New Monastic Orders of Poverty
375(2)
Religious Fervor and Dissent
377(5)
Conclusion
382(3)
An Age of Confidence, 1200-1340 385(40)
War, Conquest, and Settlement
386(12)
The Northern Crusades
386(1)
The Capture of Constantinople
387(3)
The Spanish Reconquista Advances
390(1)
Putting Down the Heretics in Their Midst
391(5)
The Mongol Takeover
396(2)
Politics of Control
398(11)
France: From Acorn to Oak
398(3)
England: Crisis and Consolidation
401(1)
Papal Monarchy
402(4)
Power Shifts in the Italian Communes
406(1)
New-Style Associations amid the Monarchies
406(1)
The Birth of Representative Institutions
407(2)
Religious and Cultural Life in an Age of Expansion
409(13)
Lay Religious Fervor
409(2)
Scholastics and Scholasticism
411(2)
New Syntheses in Writing and Music
413(2)
The Order of High Gothic
415(7)
Conclusion
422(3)
Crisis and Renaissance, 1340-1500 425(48)
A Multitude of Crises
426(22)
Economic Contraction and the Black Death
426(4)
The Hundred Years' War, 1337-1453
430(6)
Ottoman Conquest and New Political Configurations in Eastern Europe
436(3)
Hard Times
439(1)
The Crisis of the Papacy
440(4)
Stamping Out Dissenters, Heretics, Jews, and Muslims
444(3)
End of the Reconquista and Expulsion of the Jews from Spain, 1492
447(1)
New Forms of Thought and Expression: The Renaissance
448(15)
Renaissance Humanism
448(4)
New Perspectives in Art and Music
452(5)
Republics and Principalities in Italy
457(2)
The Intersection of Private and Public Lives
459(4)
On the Threshold of World History
463(8)
The Divided Mediterranean
463(2)
Portuguese Confrontations
465(1)
The Voyages of Columbus
466(1)
A New Era in Slavery
467(1)
Europeans in a New World
468(3)
Conclusion
471(2)
Struggles over Beliefs, 1500-1648 473(50)
The Protestant Reformation
474(12)
Popular Piety and Christian Humanism
474(2)
Martin Luther and the German Nation
476(3)
Huldrych Zwingli and John Calvin
479(2)
Reshaping Society through Religion
481(3)
Catholic Renewal and Missionary Zeal
484(2)
State Power and Religious Conflict, 1500-1618
486(12)
Wars among Habsburgs, Valois, and Ottomans
487(2)
French Wars of Religion
489(2)
Challenges to Habsburg Power and the Rise of the Dutch Republic
491(3)
England Goes Protestant
494(4)
The Thirty Years' War and the Balance of Power, 1618-1648
498(6)
Origins and Course of the War
498(2)
The Effects of Constant Fighting
500(1)
The Peace of Westphalia, 1648
501(2)
Growth of State Authority
503(1)
From Growth to Recession
504(5)
Causes and Consequences of Economic Crisis
505(2)
The Economic Balance of Power
507(2)
A Clash of Worldviews
509(11)
The Arts in an Age of Religious Conflict
509(3)
The Natural Laws of Politics
512(2)
Origins of the Scientific Revolution
514(3)
Magic and Witchcraft
517(3)
Conclusion
520(3)
State Building and the Search for Order, 1648-1690 523(44)
Louis XIV: Model of Absolutism
524(8)
The Fronde, 1648-1653
525(1)
Court Culture as an Element of Absolutism
526(2)
Enforcing Religious Orthodoxy
528(1)
Extending State Authority at Home and Abroad
529(3)
Absolutism in Central and Eastern Europe
532(8)
Brandenburg-Prussia and Sweden: Militaristic Absolutism
533(2)
An Uneasy Balance: Austrian Habsburgs and Ottoman Turks
535(2)
Russia: Foundations of Bureaucratic Absolutism
537(2)
Poland-Lithuania Overwhelmed
539(1)
Constitutionalism in England
540(8)
England Turned Upside Down, 1642-1660
541(4)
The "Glorious Revolution" of 1688
545(3)
Other Outposts of Constitutionalism
548(4)
The Dutch Republic
548(3)
Freedom and Slavery in the New World
551(1)
The Search for Order in Elite and Popular Culture
552(13)
Social Contract Theory: Hobbes and Locke
553(1)
Newton and the Consolidation of the Scientific Revolution
554(2)
Freedom and Order in the Arts
556(3)
Women and Manners
559(2)
Reforming Popular Culture
561(4)
Conclusion
565(2)
The Atlantic System and Its Consequences, 1690-1740 567
The Atlantic System and the World Economy
569(9)
Slavery and the Atlantic System
569(5)
World Trade and Settlement
574(3)
The Birth of Consumer Society
577(1)
New Social and Cultural Patterns
578(8)
Agricultural Revolution
578(3)
Social Life in the Cities
581(1)
The Growing Public for Culture
582(4)
Religious Revivals
586(1)
Consolidation of the European State System
586(14)
The Limits of French Absolutism
587(2)
British Rise and Dutch Decline
589(3)
Russia's Emergence as a European Power
592(2)
The Balance of Power in the East
594(3)
The Power of Diplomacy and the Importance of Numbers
597(1)
Public Hygiene and Health Care
598(2)
The Birth of the Enlightenment
600(6)
Popularization of Science and Challenges to Religion
600(2)
Travel Literature and the Challenge to Custom and Tradition
602(2)
Raising the Woman Question
604(2)
Conclusion
606
Suggested References SR-1
Glossary of Key Terms G-1
Index I-1


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...