9780771093852

The Man from Glengarry

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780771093852

  • ISBN10:

    0771093853

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2009-08-04
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart Ltd
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Summary

Ranald Macdonald's roots are in the forest of Ontario's easternmost county and his character was forged in the small Presbyterian church near his home. When he leaves to test his idealism and faith in the rough world of the lumber business, he brings pride to the minister's wife who was the model for his life. Met with international acclaim when published in 1901,The Man from Glengarryis a tale of courage and an exciting portrait of life in 19th-century Canada. From the Paperback edition.

Author Biography

Ralph Connor was born Charles William Gordon in Indian Lands, Glengarry County, Canada West (later Ontario) in 1860. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1883 and received his B.D. from Knox College in Toronto in 1887. Three years later he was ordained in Calgary a minister of the Presbyterian Church, and then moved to Banff where he served as missionary to the lumbercamps and mining villages of the area. In 1894 he moved to Winnipeg's Saint Stephen's Church, where he was pastor for the rest of his life.

Seeking financial assistance for his missionary work, the Revered Charles William Gordon wrote fictional sketches for the Presbyterian magazine The Westminster. Under the pseudonym of Ralph Connor, he soon became Canada's bestselling author both at home and abroad. His earliest sketches were collected as Black Rock (1898), and this novel, along with his next two novels, The Sky Pilot (1899) and The Man from Glengarry (1901), sold five million copies.

Connor's fiction originated in his "outdoor" Christianity. His heroes are often churchmen, among other representatives of established civilization, who minister to the needs of a frontier society.

Ralph Connor died in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 1937.


From the Paperback edition.

Excerpts

The Open River
 
The winter had broken early and the Scotch River was running ice-free and full from bank to bank. There was still snow in the woods, and with good sleighing and open rivers every day was golden to the lumbermen who had stuff to get down to the big water. A day gained now might save weeks at a chute farther down, where the rafts would crowd one another and strive for right of way.
 
Dan Murphy was mightily pleased with himself and with the bit of the world about him, for there lay his winter's cut of logs in the river below him snug and secure and held tight by a boom across the mouth, just where it flowed into the Nation. In a few days he would have his crib made, and his outfit ready to start for the Ottawa mills. He was sure to be ahead of the big timber rafts that took up so much space, and whose crews with unbearable effrontery considered themselves the aristocrats of the river.
 
Yes, it was a pleasant and satisfying sight, some three solid miles of logs boomed at the head of the big water. Suddenly Murphy turned his face up the river.
 
"What's that now, d'ye think, LeNware?" he asked.
 
LeNoir, or "LeNware," as they all called it in that country, was Dan Murphy's foreman, and as he himself said, "for haxe, for hit (eat), for fight de boss on de reever Hottawa! by Gar!" Louis LeNoir was a French-Canadian, handsome, active, hardy, and powerfully built. He had come from the New Brunswick woods some three years ago, and had wrought and fought his way, as he thought, against all rivals to the proud position of "boss on de reever," the topmost pinnacle of a lumberman's ambition. It was something to see LeNoir "run a log" across the river and back; that is, he would balance himself upon a floating log, and by spinning it round, would send it whither he would. At Murphy's question LeNoir stood listening with bent head and open mouth. Down the river came the sound of singing. "Don-no me! Ah oui! be dam! Das Macdonald gang for sure! De men from Glengarrie, les diables! Dey not hout de reever yet." His boss went off into a volley of oaths –
 
"They'll be wanting the river now, an' they're divils to fight."
 
"We give em de full belly, heh? Bon!" said LeNoir, throwing back his head. His only unconquered rival on the river was the boss of the Macdonald gang.
 
Ho ro, mo nighean donn bhoidheach,
Hi-ri, mo nighean donn bhoidheach,
Mo chaileag, laghach, bhoidheach,
Cha phosainn ach thu.
 
Down the river came the strong, clear chorus of men's voices, and soon a "pointer" pulled by six stalwart men with a lad in the stern swung round the bend into view. A single voice took up the song –
 
'S ann tha mo run's na beanntaibh,
Far bheil mo ribhinn ghreannar,
Mar ros am fasach shamhraidh
An gleann fad o shuil.
 
After the verse the full chorus broke forth again –
 
Ho ro, mo nighean, etc.
 
Swiftly the pointer shot down the current, the swaying bodies and swinging oars in perfect rhythm with the song that rose and fell with melancholy but musical cadence. The men on the high bank stood looking down upon the approaching singers. "You know dem fellers?" said LeNoir. Murphy nodded. "Ivery divil iv thim – Big Mack Cameron, Dannie Ross, Finlay Campbell – the redheaded one – the next I don't know, and yes! be dad! there's that blanked Yankee, Yankee Jim, they call him, an' bad luck till him. The divil will have to take the poker till him, for he'll bate him wid his fists, and so he will – and that big black divil is Black Hugh, the brother iv the boss Macdonald. He'll be up in the camp beyant, and a mighty luc

Excerpted from The Man from Glengarry by Ralph Connor
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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