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McKeachie's Teaching Tips : Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers,9780618515561
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McKeachie's Teaching Tips : Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers

by
Edition:
12th
ISBN13:

9780618515561

ISBN10:
0618515569
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
6/27/2005
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $73.33

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This is the 12th edition with a publication date of 6/27/2005.
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Summary

McKeachie's Teaching Tipsis a handbook designed to provide helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday problems of teaching at the university level, and those that pop up in trying to maximize learning for every student. The suggested strategies are supported by research and are grounded in enough theory to enable teachers to adapt them to their own situations. The author does not suggest a "set of recipes" to be followed mechanically, but gives teachers the tools they need to deal with the ever changing dynamics of teaching and learning. Improved Organization and consolidation of chapters allows the text to maintain its handy pocket-size length, while incorporating new information. New!Guest-Authored chapters offer advice and instruction from renowned educators, including Peter Elbow and Mary Deane Sorcinelli on writing, Jane Halonen on laboratory instruction (Chapter 20), and Marilla Svinicki on being a teacher (Chapter 27). Updated and Improved Technology Coverage, (Chapter 18) "Technology and Teaching" includes coverage of current issues such as: the use of PowerPoint slides, plagiarism, and effective Web research. Additional and relevant technology coverage will be interspersed in other chapters where appropriate. Expanded coverage of Experimental Learning (Chapter 21) and Updated Coverage of Hot Topics in higher education reflects recent policy shifts, current terminology, and changes in the field. Strengthened Coverage of Diversity in Chapter 13, written by Richard M. Suinn. Additional coverage of diversity is integrated throughout the text to include gender issues and learners with special needs to help instructors who need more background and experience with these issues. Increased Coverage of Standards and Accountability issues throughout the text.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
A Special Preface for Teaching Assistants and Graduate Student Instructors xxi
Part 1 Getting Started 1(28)
CHAPTER 1 Introduction
2(7)
The College or University Culture
3(1)
Research Versus Teaching?
4(1)
Teaching as Scholarship
5(1)
In Conclusion
5(4)
CHAPTER 2 Countdown for Course Preparation
9(12)
Time: Three Months Before the First Class
10(5)
Write Objectives, Goals, or Outcomes
10(1)
What Goals?
11(2)
Order Textbooks, Lab Supplies, or Other Resources Students May Need
13(1)
Choose a Textbook or Other Reading Materials
14(1)
Time: Two Months Before the First Class
15(2)
Begin Drafting a Syllabus for the Course
15(2)
Time: One Month Before the First Class
17(2)
Begin Preparing Lesson Plans
17(1)
Plan for Out-of-Class Learning
18(1)
Choose Appropriate Teaching Methods
18(1)
Select Appropriate Technology
19(1)
Time: Two Weeks Before the First Class
19(1)
Check Resources
19(1)
Start a Portfolio
20(1)
Time: One Week Before the First Class
20(1)
CHAPTER 3 Meeting a Class for the First Time
21(8)
Setting the Stage
22(1)
Breaking the Ice
22(2)
Problem Posting
24(1)
Introducing the Syllabus
25(1)
Testing, Grading, and Fairness
25(1)
Introducing the Textbook
26(1)
Assessing Prior Knowledge
26(1)
Questions and Reactions
27(1)
What About Subject Matter?
27(1)
In Conclusion
28(1)
Part 2 Basic Skills for Facilitating Student Learning 29(110)
CHAPTER 4 Reading as Active Learning
30(5)
Textbooks
30(1)
How Do You Get Students to Do the Assigned Reading?
31(3)
Research on Learning from Reading
32(1)
Teaching Students to Learn More from Reading
33(1)
In Conclusion
34(1)
CHAPTER 5 Facilitating Discussion: Posing Problems, Listening, Questioning
35(22)
A Little Bit of Theory
36(1)
Problems in Teaching by Discussion
37(1)
Starting Discussion
37(7)
Starting Discussion with a Common Experience
37(1)
Starting Discussion with a Controversy
38(1)
Starting Discussion with Questions
39(2)
Starting Discussion with a Problem or Case
41(1)
Breaking a Problem into Subproblems
42(1)
Socratic Discussion
42(2)
Barriers to Discussion
44(1)
What Can I Do About Nonparticipants?
45(4)
Groups-Peer Learning
48(1)
The Inner Circle or Fishbowl
48(1)
The Discussion Monopolizer
49(1)
How Can We Have a Discussion If the Students Haven't Read the Assignment?
49(1)
Handling Arguments and Emotional Reactions
50(3)
The Two-Column Method
51(1)
Emotional Reactions
52(1)
Teaching Students How to Learn Through Discussion
53(1)
Student-Led Discussions
54(1)
Taking Minutes or Notes, Summarizing
54(1)
Online Discussions
55(1)
In Conclusion
55(2)
CHAPTER 6 How to Make Lectures More Effective
57(17)
Research on the Effectiveness of Lectures
58(1)
What Are Lectures Good For?
58(1)
A Little Bit of Theory
59(1)
Planning Lectures
60(1)
Preparing Your Lecture Notes
61(1)
Organization of Lectures
62(4)
The Introduction
63(1)
The Body of the Lecture
64(2)
How Can Lectures Be Improved?
66(2)
Attention
67(1)
What Can Be Done to Get Attention?
67(1)
Teaching Students How to Be Better Listeners
68(1)
How Do Students Process the Content of a Lecture?
69(1)
Should Students Take Notes?
70(2)
How to Get Students Actively Thinking in a Lecture Situation
72(1)
The Lecturer as a Person
72(1)
In Conclusion
73(1)
CHAPTER 7 Assessing, Testing, and Evaluating: Grading Is Not the Most Important Function
74(13)
Planning Methods of Testing and Assessment
76(1)
Alternative Testing Models
77(2)
Group Testing
77(1)
Online Testing
78(1)
Other Methods of Assessing Learning
79(6)
Performance Assessment (Authentic Assessment)
79(1)
Graphic Representations of Concepts
80(2)
Journals, Research Papers, and Annotated Bibliographies
82(1)
Portfolios
82(1)
Peer Assessment
83(1)
Assessing Group Work
83(2)
Classroom Assessment
85(1)
In Conclusion
85(2)
CHAPTER 8 Testing: The Details
87(18)
When to Test
87(1)
Constructing the Test
88(6)
Choosing the Type of Question
88(4)
How Many Questions Should You Use?
92(2)
Administering the Test
94(1)
After the Test
94(9)
Grading Essay Questions
94(4)
Helping Yourself Learn from the Test
98(1)
Assigning a Grade
98(3)
Returning Test Papers
101(1)
Dealing with an Aggrieved Student
102(1)
What Do You Do About the Student Who Missed the Test?
102(1)
In Conclusion
103(2)
CHAPTER 9 Tests from the Students' Perspective
105(8)
Reducing Student Frustration and Aggression
106(1)
Helping Students Become Test-Wise
107(4)
Taking Multiple-Choice Tests
107(1)
Taking Essay Tests
108(1)
Why Teach Test Taking?
109(1)
Helping Students Learn from a Test
109(2)
In Conclusion
111(2)
CHAPTER 10 What to Do About Cheating
113(10)
Who Cheats?
114(1)
Why Do Students Cheat?
115(1)
How Do Students Cheat?
115(1)
Preventing Cheating
116(2)
Preventing Plagiarism in the Internet Age
118(1)
Handling Cheating
119(2)
In Conclusion
121(2)
CHAPTER 11 The ABC's of Assigning Grades
123(16)
Do Grades Provide Information Useful for Decision Making?
124(2)
Can We Trust Grades?
126(2)
Contract Grading
128(1)
Competency-Based Grading
128(2)
Assigning Grades
130(1)
Grading on the Curve (Norm-Referenced) vs. Grading Against a Preset Standard (Criterion-Referenced)
131(2)
What About the Student Who Wants a Grade Changed?
133(2)
Grades vs. Learning: Some Related Research
135(2)
In Conclusion
137(2)
Part 3 Understanding Students 139(52)
CHAPTER 12 Motivation in the College Classroom
140(11)
By Barbara K. Hofer, Middlebury College
Motivational Theories: An Overview
141(6)
Autonomy and Self-Determination
141(1)
Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation
142(1)
Expectancy-Value Theory
143(1)
Mastery and Performance Goals
144(1)
Attribution Theory
145(1)
Social Goals and Social Motivation
146(1)
Putting Motivation Theory into Practice
147(2)
In Conclusion
149(2)
CHAPTER 13 Teaching Culturally Diverse Students
151(21)
By Richard M. Suinn, Colorado State University
Culture and Communication
152(7)
Nonverbal Communication
152(3)
Verbal Communication
155(4)
Motivation and Stress
159(8)
Cultural Differences in Motivation
159(1)
Cultural Stressors
160(4)
Increasing Motivation
164(1)
Dealing with Stressors
165(2)
Tailoring Your Teaching Methods
167(4)
Match Learning Styles
167(1)
Be Concrete
168(1)
Enhance Performance Measurement
168(1)
Choose Appropriate Nonverbal Behaviors
169(1)
Be Accessible
169(2)
In Conclusion
171(1)
CHAPTER 14 Dealing with Student Problems and Problem Students (There's Almost Always at Least One!)
172(19)
Intellectual/Academic Problems
173(5)
Aggressive, Challenging Students
173(1)
Students Who Want the Truth and Students Who Believe that Everything Is Relative
174(1)
Students Who Are Underprepared for the Course or Struggling
175(2)
Individualized Teaching and Mentoring
177(1)
Class Management Problems
178(11)
Attention Seekers and Students Who Dominate Discussions
179(1)
Inattentive Students
180(1)
Students Who Come to Class Unprepared
181(1)
The Flatterer, Disciple, Con Man (or Woman)
182(1)
Students with Excuses
183(1)
Emotional Problems
184(1)
Angry Students
184(2)
Discouraged, Ready-to-Give-Up Students
186(1)
Students with Emotional Reactions to Sensitive Topics
187(1)
Dealing with Psychological Problems
188(1)
Potential Suicides
188(1)
In Conclusion
189(2)
Part 4 Adding to Your Repertoire of Skills and Strategies for Facilitating Active Learning 191(62)
CHAPTER 15 How to Enhance Learning by Using High-Stakes and Low-Stakes Writing
192(21)
By Peter Elbow and Mary Deane Sorcinelli, University of Massachusetts Amherst
A Little Theory: High Stakes and Low Stakes
192(1)
Low-Stakes Writing
193(3)
Kinds
193(1)
Occasions
193(2)
Handling Low-Stakes Writing
195(1)
High-Stakes Writing
196(7)
Topics and Assignments
197(1)
Criteria for Evaluation
198(1)
Multiple Papers and Multiple Drafts
198(2)
Worst-Case Scenario
200(1)
Responding to High-Stakes Papers
201(2)
Middle-Stakes Assignments: Think Pieces
203(1)
Peer Response
204(1)
About Correctness: Spelling and Grammar
205(1)
About Grading
206(2)
Portfolios
207(1)
Contract Grading
208(1)
Preventing-and Handling-Plagiarism
208(3)
In Conclusion
211(2)
CHAPTER 16 Active Learning: Cooperative, Collaborative, and Peer Learning
213(8)
Peer Learning and Teaching
214(1)
Peer Tutoring
215(1)
The Learning Cell
216(1)
Team Learning: Syndicate and Jigsaw
217(1)
Student Characteristics and Peer Learning
218(1)
Why Does Peer Learning Work?
218(1)
In Conclusion
219(2)
CHAPTER 17 Problem-Based Learning: Teaching with Cases, Simulations, and Games
221(8)
Problem-Based Learning
221(1)
The Case Method
222(3)
Finding the Right Cases
224(1)
Tips for Teaching with Cases
224(1)
Games and Simulations
225(2)
In Conclusion
227(2)
CHAPTER 18 Technology and Teaching
229(24)
By Erping Zhu and Matthew Kaplan, University of Michigan
How Will Technology Enhance Teaching and Learning?
230(1)
What Considerations Go into Teaching with Technology?
231(17)
Course Content
232(2)
The Instructor
234(2)
Students
236(2)
Technology Tools
238(10)
What Are the Effects of Technology on Teaching?
248(3)
In Conclusion
251(2)
Part 5 Skills for Use in Other Teaching Situations 253(46)
CHAPTER 19 Teaching Large Classes (You Can Still Get Active Learning!)
254(12)
Facilitating Active Learning
255(3)
Encouraging Student Writing in Large Classes
256(1)
Other Ways to Maintain Student Involvement
257(1)
Student Anonymity
258(1)
Organization Is the Key
259(4)
Giving Tests in Large Classes
259(2)
Making Outside Reading Assignments
261(1)
Communicating with Large Classes
262(1)
Coordinating Multisection Courses
263(1)
Training and Supervising Teaching Assistants
264(1)
In Conclusion
265(1)
CHAPTER 20 Laboratory Instruction: Ensuring an Active Learning Experience
266(12)
By Brian P. Coppola, University of Michigan
Styles of Laboratory Instruction
267(5)
Expository Instruction
268(1)
Inquiry Instruction
268(1)
Discovery Instruction
269(1)
Problem-Based Learning
270(2)
Studio Instruction Brings Together the Arts and Sciences
272(1)
Turning Novice Researchers into Practicing Scientists
273(2)
Link to Cognitive Development
275(1)
What Research Says
276(1)
In Conclusion
276(2)
CHAPTER 21 The Teacher's Role in Experiential Learning
278(10)
By Richard D. Mann, University of Michigan
History of Experiential Learning
279(1)
Six Possible Roles
280(6)
The Teacher as Expert
280(1)
The Teacher as Facilitator
281(1)
The Teacher as Person
282(1)
The Teacher as Ego Ideal
282(1)
The Teacher as Formal Authority: Options for Assessing Field Learning
283(2)
The Teacher as Socializing Agent
285(1)
Outcomes
286(1)
In Conclusion
286(2)
CHAPTER 22 Teaching by Distance Education
288(11)
By Andrew Northedge, The Open University
Sketching Out the Shape of a Course
289(5)
Developing a Teaching Narrative
294(1)
Making the Course Manageable
295(1)
In Conclusion
296(3)
Part 6 Teaching for Higher-Level Goals 299(44)
CHAPTER 23 Teaching Students How to Become More Strategic and Self-Regulated Learners
300(18)
By Claire Ellen Weinstein, University of Texas at Austin
What Are the Characteristics of Strategic Learners?
301(1)
The Importance of Goals and Self-Reflection
302(1)
Increasing Students' Self-Awareness
303(1)
Using Existing Knowledge to Help Learn New Things
304(1)
Teaching Domain-Specific and Course-Specific Strategies
305(4)
Methods for Checking Understanding
309(2)
Knowing How to Learn Is Not Enough-Students Must Also Want to Learn
311(1)
Putting It All Together-Executive Control Processes in Strategic Learning
312(2)
What Instructors Can Do to Help Their Students Succeed in Online Lessons and Courses
314(2)
In Conclusion
316(2)
CHAPTER 24 Teaching Thinking
318(7)
By Jane S. Halonen, University of West Florida
Setting Goals for Thinking
320(2)
Improving Thinking Quality
322(1)
In Conclusion
323(2)
CHAPTER 25 The Ethics of Teaching and the Teaching of Ethics
325(18)
Responsibilities to Students
328(7)
To Encourage the Free Pursuit of Learning
329(1)
To Demonstrate Respect for Students
330(1)
To Respect Confidentiality
331(1)
To Model the Best Scholarly and Ethical Standards
332(1)
To Foster Honest Academic Conduct and to Ensure Fair Evaluation
332(1)
To Avoid Exploitation, Harassment, or Discrimination
333(2)
The Teaching of Ethics
335(4)
How Can We Teach Values?
337(1)
Modeling Values
338(1)
Making Ethical Choices
339(1)
In Conclusion
340(3)
Part 7 Lifelong Learning for the Teacher 343(17)
CHAPTER 26 Vitality and Growth Throughout Your Teaching Career
344(16)
How Can You Develop Effective Skills and Strategies?
346(1)
Looking for New Ideas, New Methods, and Alternative Strategies for Handling Problems
347(1)
Reading
347(1)
Hearing, Discussing
347(1)
Seeing, Experiencing
348(1)
How Can You Get and Use Feedback to Continue to Improve Your Teaching?
348(9)
Feedback from Student Performance
348(1)
Feedback from Peers
349(1)
Feedback from Faculty Development Specialists
350(1)
Feedback from Students
351(2)
Keys to Improvement with Feedback from Students
353(2)
Consultation
355(1)
Classroom Assessment and Research
356(1)
Self-Evaluation
357(1)
In Conclusion
357(3)
References 360(31)
Index 391


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