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Methods for Effective Teaching

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780205367740

ISBN10:
0205367747
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon

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Summary

Methods for Effective Teaching discusses research-based general teaching methods while emphasizing contemporary issues, including creating a learning community, differentiating your instruction, and making instruction modifications based on student differences. This edition offers new content on motivating students for a learning community, working with colleagues and parents, differentiating your instruction, and managing lesson delivery. Thorough coverage of classroom management and discipline includes discussion of dynamic ways to create a positive learning environment. Several pedagogical features about technology, learning communities, and instructional modifications for diverse classrooms engage the reader in decision making about chapter concepts, and Teachers in Action testimonials provide perspectives from real teachers. Each pedagogical feature provokes rich classroom discussions about teacher decision making and application of concepts. The numerous features, tables, and lists of recommendations ensure that the text is reader-friendly and practically oriented.

Author Biography

David M. Byrd is a professor in the School of Education at the University of Rhode Island.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
About the Authors xix
PART I FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING METHODS
Introduction to Teacher Decision Making
1(21)
How This Book is Organized
2(2)
Content
2(1)
Features
3(1)
Decision Making
4(8)
The Decisions That Teachers Make Matter
5(1)
Standards and Education
6(2)
Teachers as Decision Makers
8(2)
Teachers as Reflective Practitioners
10(1)
Decision Making in the Teaching Environment
11(1)
Decisions That Teachers Make
12(3)
Creating a Learning Community
12(2)
Reflection and a Constructivist Approach to Teaching
14(1)
How Teachers Can Improve Their Decision Making
15(7)
PART II PLANNING INSTRUCTION
The Fundamentals of Planning
22(36)
Planning
23(11)
Reasons for Planning
24(1)
Planning Phases
24(1)
Factors Considered in Planning
25(5)
Planning and the Standards Movement
30(4)
Approaches to Planning
34(12)
The Linear-Rational Model
35(8)
The Mental-Image Approach
43(3)
Additional Planning Considerations
46(7)
Resources for Planning
46(2)
Teacher Student Planning
48(1)
Team Planning
49(2)
Preparing a Syllabus
51(1)
Planning to Motivate Students
52(1)
Planning to Use Academic Time Wisely
52(1)
How Teachers Really Plan
53(5)
Types of Teacher Planning
58(36)
Types of Teacher Plans
59(20)
Course Planning
60(5)
Term Planning
65(1)
Unit Planning
65(4)
Weekly Planning
69(2)
Daily Planning
71(8)
Components of a Daily Lesson Plan
79(15)
Identifying Course Information
79(1)
Objectives for the Lesson
79(9)
Procedures
88(1)
Materials
88(1)
Evaluation of Students
89(1)
Other Possible Items
90(4)
The Inclusive and Multicultural Classroom
94(22)
Sources of Student Diversity
95(13)
Cognitive Area
96(2)
Affective Area
98(1)
Physical Area
99(1)
Learning Styles
99(2)
Creative Potential
101(2)
Gender
103(1)
Language
103(1)
Cultural Diversity
104(1)
Disabilities
105(1)
Students at Risk
106(1)
Socioeconomic Status
107(1)
Creating an Inclusive, Multicultural Classroom
108(8)
Create a Supportive, Caring Environment
108(1)
Offer a Responsive Curriculum
109(1)
Vary Your Instruction
110(3)
Provide Assistance When Needed
113(3)
Motivating Students for a Learning Community
116(31)
Planning for Motivation
118(1)
Motivational Strategies Concerning Instruction
119(15)
Motivational Strategies Concerning Evaluation and Feedback
134(13)
PART III SELECTING INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Differentiating Your Instruction
147(17)
Differentiating Your Instruction
149(1)
Vehicles of Differentiation
150(7)
Elements of the Curriculum That Can & Differentiated
150(4)
Student Characteristics for Which Teachers Can Differentiate
154(2)
Instructional Strategies That Facilitate Differentiation
156(1)
Grouping Students for Instruction
157(7)
Whole-Group Instruction
158(1)
Small-Group Instruction
158(3)
Independent Work
161(3)
Direct Instructional Strategies
164(21)
Deductive and Instructive Strategies
165(1)
Direct Instructional Approaches
166(19)
Direct Instruction
167(3)
Presentations
170(2)
Demonstrations
172(2)
Questions
174(4)
Recitations
178(1)
Practice and Drills
178(1)
Reviews
178(1)
Guided Practice and Homework
179(6)
Indirect Instructional Strategies
185(26)
Inductive Approaches
186(10)
Concept Attainment Approaches
187(5)
Inquiry Lessons
192(3)
Projects, Reports, and Problems
195(1)
Social Approaches
196(11)
Discussions
196(3)
Cooperative Learning
199(4)
Panels and Debates
203(1)
Role Playing, Simulations, and Games
204(3)
Independent Approaches
207(4)
Learning Centers or Stations
207(1)
Contracts and Independent Work
207(4)
PART IV MANAGING INSTRUCTION AND THE CLASSROOM
Managing Lesson Delivery
211(23)
Issues Affective Lesson Delivery
212(3)
The Degree of Structure in Lessons
212(1)
Holding Students Academically Accountable
213(2)
Lesson Delivery
215(19)
The Beginning of a Lesson
216(6)
The Middle of a Lesson
222(7)
The Ending of a Lesson
229(5)
Classroom Management
234(43)
Classroom Management
235(4)
Order in the Classroom
236(1)
Domains of Classroom Management
237(2)
Preparing for the School Year
239(14)
Making Management Preparations
240(2)
Making Instructional Preparations
242(3)
Establishing a Plan to Deal with Misbehavior
245(2)
Planning for the First Day
247(3)
Conducting the First Day
250(3)
Organizing Your Classroom and Materials
253(4)
Floor Space
254(1)
Storage Space
255(2)
Bulletin Boards and Wall Space
257(1)
Selecting and Teaching Rules and Procedures
257(5)
Rules
258(3)
Procedures
261(1)
Establishing a Cooperative Classroom
262(15)
Building Positive Teacher-student Relationships
264(3)
Building Group Cohesiveness
267(2)
Maintaining Attention and Involvement
269(3)
Reinforcing Desired Behaviors
272(5)
Classroom Discipline
277(26)
Misbehavior
278(4)
Misbehavior in Context
278(1)
Causes of Misbehavior
279(2)
Types of Misbehavior
281(1)
Degrees of Severity
281(1)
Interventions
282(6)
The Principle of Least Intervention
283(1)
Some Practices to Avoid
283(3)
Cautions and Guidelines for Punishment
286(2)
A Three-Step Response Plan
288(15)
Situational Assistance
289(3)
Mild Responses
292(6)
Moderate Responses
298(5)
PART V ASSESSING STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Assessing Student Performance
303(26)
Evaluation
304(2)
Types of Evaluation
304(1)
Measurement, Assessment, and Evaluation
305(1)
Norm-referenced and Criterion-referenced Evaluation
305(1)
Characteristics of Good Assessment Instruments
306(1)
Establishing a Framework for Evaluation
306(1)
Performance-Based Assessments
307(7)
Product Assessments
308(2)
Performance Assessments
310(2)
Ways to Rate Student Products or Performances
312(2)
Teacher Made Tests
314(15)
Planning the Classroom Test
314(3)
Selecting and Preparing Test Questions
317(6)
Assembling the Test
323(2)
Administering the Test
325(1)
Scoring the Test
325(4)
Grading Systems, Marking, and Reporting
329(26)
Purposes of Grading
330(4)
Functions of Grades
331(1)
Confounding the Achievement Grade
332(2)
Grading Systems
334(2)
Percentage Grades
334(1)
Letter Grades
334(1)
Descriptive Evaluations
335(1)
Parent Teacher Conferences
335(1)
Pass-Fail Grading
335(1)
Checklists of Objectives
335(1)
Assigning Letter Grades
336(7)
Determining What to Include in a Grade
336(1)
Creating a Composite Score
336(3)
Selecting a Frame of Reference for Grading
339(1)
Determining the Distribution of Grades
340(2)
Calculating Semester and Annual Grades
342(1)
Nonachievement Outcomes
343(1)
Rating Scales
343(1)
Checklists
343(1)
Special Reports
344(1)
Designing a Gradebook
344(3)
Daily Record
345(1)
Achievement Scores
345(1)
Summary Charts
346(1)
Reporting Grades and Communicating to Parents
347(4)
Report Cards
348(1)
Cumulative Record Files
348(1)
Newsletters to All Parents
349(1)
Open House
350(1)
Parent Teacher Conferences
350(1)
Contacts with Individual Parents
351(1)
General Principles in Grading and Reporting
351(4)
PART VI WORKING WITH OTHERS
Working with Colleagues and Parents
355(23)
Working with Colleagues
356(1)
Working with Parents
357(4)
Reasons for Working with Parents
358(1)
Why Some Parents Resist Involvement
359(1)
Building a Parental Support System
360(1)
Contacting and Communicating with Parents
361(17)
Ways to Communicate with Parents
362(10)
Parent Teacher Conferences
372(6)
References 378(11)
Name Index 389(4)
Subject Index 393


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