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National Security for a New Era,9780205779031

National Security for a New Era

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780205779031

ISBN10:
0205779034
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/28/2010
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $87.20

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Summary

In this new edition ofNational Security in a New Era, renowned security scholar Donald M. Snow continues to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of the United Statesrs" national security situation and the security policies the U.S. adopts. This text examines national security from two fundamental fault lines-the end of the Cold War and the 9/11 terrorist attacks-and considers how the resulting era of globalization and geopolitics guides policy. Placing this trend in conceptual and historical context and following it through military, semi-military, and non-military concerns,National Security in a New Eratreats its subject as a nuanced and subtle phenomenon that encompasses everything from the nation to the individual.

Author Biography

In this new edition of National Security in a New Era, renowned security scholar Donald M. Snow continues to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of the United States' national security situation and the security policies the U.S. adopts. This text examines national security from two fundamental fault lines-the end of the Cold War and the 9/11 terrorist attacks-and considers how the resulting era of globalization and geopolitics guides policy. Placing this trend in conceptual and historical context and following it through military, semi-military, and non-military concerns, National Security in a New Era treats its subject as a nuanced and subtle phenomenon that encompasses everything from the nation to the individual.

Table of Contents

Prefacep. ix
Conceptual Contextp. 1
The Changing Problem of National Securityp. 3
Previewp. 3
The Nature of Changep. 5
How Much Has Changed?p. 6
New Dynamics in the Environmentp. 7
CHALLENGE! Your Own Personal Inventoryp. 16
Obama's (Potential) Dramasp. 16
Conclusion: Where from Here?p. 18
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 18
Selected Bibliographyp. 19
The Realist Paradigmp. 21
Previewp. 21
Realism and the Realist Paradigmp. 24
Basic Concepts and Relationshipsp. 25
Sovereigntyp. 26
Vital Interestsp. 27
Finding the Boundary Between Vital and Less-than-Vital Interests in Iranp. 29
Power Politicsp. 30
Measuring Powerp. 31
Paradigm Implicationsp. 33
Critiques and Anomalies of the Realist Paradigmp. 35
Critiquesp. 35
Realists, Neoconservatives, and the Iraq Warp. 38
Anomaliesp. 39
CHALLENGE! Obama, the ICC, and Bush "War Crimes"?p. 40
Conclusion: The Realist Paradigm Todayp. 41
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 43
Selected Bibliographyp. 44
Security, Interests, and Powerp. 45
Previewp. 45
Thinking About Securityp. 47
Military and Nonmilitary Elements of Securityp. 47
CHALLENGE! Defining Terrorism as a Security Threatp. 49
Israel, Syria, the Golan Heights, and Waterp. 50
Levels of Securityp. 51
Risk and Risk Managementp. 54
What Should the United States Do About North Korea?p. 54
Thinking About Interestsp. 56
Levels of Interestsp. 57
Vital and Less-than-Vital Interests and Afghanistanp. 60
Security and Interests in the Contemporary Environmentp. 61
Applying Instruments of Powerp. 62
Using the Instrumentsp. 62
The Contemporary Balance of Instruments of Powerp. 64
Conclusion: The Changing Nature of Influencep. 65
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 67
Selected Bibliographyp. 67
The American Experiencep. 69
Previewp. 69
Conditioning Factors in the American Traditionp. 70
American Ahistoricismp. 70
Accident of Geographyp. 72
The Anglo-Saxon Heritagep. 73
Dealing with Dependence on Persian Gulf Oilp. 74
Evolution of the American Experiencep. 75
The Formative Period, 1789-1945p. 76
Antimilitary Biasp. 77
The Citizen-Soldierp. 78
Myth of Invincibilityp. 79
Mobilization and Demobilizationp. 80
Total War Preferencep. 80
Readiness and Pearl Harborp. 81
The Cold War, 1945-1989p. 82
The Role of the Mediap. 85
The Impact of Democratic Institutionsp. 86
The Media and the Iraq Warp. 87
Professionalization of the Militaryp. 88
CONCLUSION: The Contemporary Period, 1989 to the Presentp. 89
CHALLENGE! How Much Has Changed?p. 90
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 91
Selected Bibliographyp. 91
The Domestic Environmentp. 93
Previewp. 93
Extremism in the Defense of Libertyp. 95
The Historical Domestic Contextp. 96
The Structure of Domestic Politicsp. 100
The Executive Branchp. 101
The President, the Constitution, and National Securityp. 102
The Congressp. 108
The Congress, the Constitution, and National Securityp. 108
Applications: The Homeland Security Response to the Environmentp. 115
The Department of Homeland Securityp. 116
Background and Evolutionp. 116
The Homeland Security Response to September 11p. 118
Ongoing Problems and Controversiesp. 121
CHALLENGE! The "Angry Librarians" and Civil Libertiesp. 123
Conclusion: The Environment Since September 11, 2001p. 124
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 125
Selected Bibliographyp. 125
Historical Contextp. 127
Fault Linesp. 129
Previewp. 129
The First Fault Line: The World After the Cold Warp. 132
Russian Resurgence?p. 134
Undeniable Benefitsp. 135
Debatable Changesp. 136
The Second Fault Line: The World After September 11p. 140
The Rules of War: Who Is a POW?p. 143
Toward the New International System?p. 145
Paradigm Choicesp. 146
The American Role in the New World Systemp. 147
The Post-9/11 Era?p. 150
Conclusion: The Continuing Role of Forcep. 151
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 153
Selected Bibliographyp. 154
The Nature and End of the Cold Warp. 155
Previewp. 155
The Cold War Systemp. 157
Characteristicsp. 159
Better Dead than Red? Better Red than Dead?p. 160
Sources of Changep. 162
Forms of Military Competitionp. 163
Conventional Forcesp. 165
Nuclear Forcesp. 166
The Capitalist Bombp. 168
Deadlock of the Competitionp. 169
The Economic Dimensionp. 169
The Military Dimensionp. 171
Convergencep. 172
Cold War Residuesp. 174
Russia and the Successor Statesp. 174
Chechnya and the Pipelinep. 176
Russian Resurgencep. 177
CHALLENGE! What Kind of Russia?p. 179
Conclusion: The End of the Cold War in Perspectivep. 179
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 180
Selected Bibliographyp. 180
Globalization and Beyondp. 182
Previewp. 182
The Bretton Woods System, 1945-1971p. 184
The Settingp. 184
The Bretton Woods Institutionsp. 185
The ITO and the Anti-Free Tradersp. 187
The Breakdown of Bretton Woodsp. 188
The Transitional Period, 1971-1990p. 190
American Declinep. 190
American Revivalp. 191
The Globalizing Economy, 1990-Presentp. 192
Characteristics and Valuesp. 193
Objections to Globalizationp. 196
The Rejectionistsp. 199
The United States in a Multipolar Economic Environmentp. 200
New Additions to the National Security Agendap. 200
Conclusion: Globalization and Other Factors in American Securityp. 206
CHALLENGE! Other National Security Challenges?p. 208
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 208
Selected Bibliographyp. 209
Legacies of 9/11p. 211
Previewp. 211
Defining Terrorismp. 214
Terrorist Actsp. 215
Terrorist Targetsp. 217
Terrorist Objectivesp. 219
The United States-Al Qaeda Standoff?p. 221
Perspectives on and Causes of Terrorismp. 221
Three Perspectivesp. 222
Three Causesp. 223
Profiling Suicide Terroristsp. 226
Terrorism Since September 11p. 227
Other Legaciesp. 229
The Problem of Torturep. 230
Pakistan and the Law of Unintended Consequencesp. 234
Conclusion: Terrorism, Torture, and Unintended Consequencesp. 237
CHALLENGE! Terrorism and You!p. 239
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 240
Selected Bibliographyp. 241
Ongoing Military Problemsp. 243
Previewp. 243
Nuclear Forces and Deterrencep. 245
Seminal Events of the Nuclear Agep. 245
Theories of Deterrencep. 248
Nuclear Residuesp. 250
Iranian Proliferation and Israelp. 255
The Chinese Nuclear Threatp. 256
Traditional Forces and the Futurep. 258
The Heavy Forces (Conventional) Modelp. 259
The Light Forces (Unconventional) Modelp. 261
Light or Heavy Futures?p. 262
Traditional Residuesp. 262
Light and Heavy Forces?p. 263
Military Manpowerp. 263
CHALLENGE! Military Service After Iraqp. 265
Military Reformp. 265
Conclusion: The Continuing Relevance of Traditional Forcesp. 267
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 269
Selected Bibliographyp. 269
New Challengesp. 271
Asymmetrical Warfare: The "New Kind of War"p. 273
Previewp. 273
Symmetrical and Asymmetrical Warfarep. 276
Evolution of Asymmetrical Warfarep. 277
Sun Tzu on Asymmetrical Warfarep. 278
The Contemporary Settingp. 280
Asymmetrical Futures?p. 287
Fourth-Generation Warfarep. 287
New Internal Warsp. 292
Hearts and Minds in Afghanistanp. 296
Conclusion: New Form or New Face of War?p. 297
CHALLENGE! Is There a New Kind of War?p. 298
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 298
Selected Bibliographyp. 299
The Unresolved Dilemmas in Afghanistan and Iraqp. 301
Previewp. 301
The Afghanistan Warp. 304
The Road to War: Was the United States Justified?p. 306
Was the Mission Feasible?p. 308
What Went Wrong and Why?p. 311
Afghanistan as a War of Necessityp. 312
How Will the Afghanistan War End?p. 314
Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Al Qaedap. 315
The Iraq Warp. 315
The Road to War: Was the United States Justified?p. 316
Hidden Agendas in Iraqp. 319
Was the Mission Feasible?p. 320
What Went Wrong and Why?p. 325
Iraq as a War of Choicep. 325
How Will the Iraq War End?p. 326
The Legacies of Afghanistan and Iraqp. 327
The Political Legacy: Be Careful Where You Intervenep. 328
The Military Legacy: What Kind of Foe to Prepare Forp. 329
Afghanistan, Iraq and the American Military: What Kind of Forcep. 330
CHALLENGE! The Draft Optionp. 333
Conclusion: Security After Afghanistan and Iraqp. 335
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 336
Selected Bibliographyp. 336
Terrorism, Peacekeeping, and State Buildingp. 338
Previewp. 338
The Contemporary Scenep. 339
Dealing with Terrorismp. 342
Antiterrorism and Counterterrorismp. 344
The Cost-Effectiveness of Suppressing Terrorismp. 345
International and National Effortsp. 346
Objectives of the Effortp. 347
Peacekeeping and State Buildingp. 347
Basic Distinctionsp. 349
Peacekeepingp. 351
The Talk-Shoot Relationship in Peacekeepingp. 354
State Buildingp. 355
KFOR and UNMIKp. 361
CHALLENGE! What Should the United States Do in Afghanistan?p. 362
Conclusion: The Future of Terrorism, Peacekeeping, and State Buildingp. 364
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 364
Selected Bibliographyp. 365
Extending Security Under Obamap. 367
Previewp. 367
Border Securityp. 369
The Physical Problemp. 370
Border Threatsp. 372
National Resources Securityp. 376
An Impenetrable Border?p. 377
Petroleum Energy Securityp. 378
CHALLENGE! Oil and Terrorp. 381
Water Securityp. 381
Environmental Securityp. 384
Global Warmingp. 385
The United States, Kyoto, and Copenhagenp. 386
Hurricane Katrinap. 388
Health/Disease Securityp. 389
Conclusion: Expanded Security Horizonsp. 392
Study/Discussion Questionsp. 394
Selected Bibliographyp. 394
Indexp. 396
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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