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Organizational Theory, Design, and Change

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131403710

ISBN10:
0131403710
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
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Summary

For undergraduate and graduate courses in Organization Theory, and Organizational Change. This text provides the most current, thorough, and contemporary account of the factors affecting the organizational design process, making important organization theories accessible and interesting to students. It addresses the many issues and problems that are involved in managing the process of organizational change and transformation, providing direct and clear managerial implications.

Table of Contents

PREFACE xxi
PART I THE ORGANIZATION AND ITS ENVIRONMENT 1
Chapter 1 Organizations and Organizational Effectiveness
1(30)
What Is an Organization?
1(7)
How Does an Organization Create Value?
2(3)
Why Do Organizations Exist?
5(3)
Organizational Theory, Design, and Change
8(7)
Organizational Structure
8(1)
Organizational Culture
9(1)
Organizational Design and Change
10(2)
The Importance of Organizational Design and Change
12(3)
The Consequences of Poor Organizational Design
15(1)
How Do Managers Measure Organizational Effectiveness?
15(10)
The External Resource Approach: Control
17(1)
The Internal Systems Approach: Innovation
18(1)
The Technical Approach: Efficiency
18(2)
Measuring Effectiveness: Organizational Goals
20(2)
The Plan of This Book
22(2)
Organizational Design
24(1)
Organizational Change
24(1)
Summary
25(1)
Discussion Questions
26(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
26(2)
Practicing Organizational Theory: Open Systems Dynamics
26(1)
Making the Connection #1
26(1)
The Ethical Dimension #1
26(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #1
26 (1)
Assignment
27(1)
Case for Analysis Kinko's New Operating Structure
28(1)
References
29
Focus on New Information Technology
Amazon.com, Part 1
4(7)
Organizational Insight
1.1 Opposite Organizing Approaches at Apple and Dell Computer
11(5)
1.2 Redesigning AOL-Time Warner
16(3)
1.3 Ups and Downs at Mattel
19(1)
1.4 Improving Efficiency at FedEx and UPS
20(11)
Chapter 2 Stakeholders, Managers, and Ethics
31(29)
Organizational Stakeholders
31(5)
Inside Stakeholders
32(2)
Outside Stakeholders
34(2)
Organizational Effectiveness: Satisfying Stakeholders' Goals and Interests
36 (3)
Competing Goals
37(1)
Allocating Rewards
38(1)
Top Managers and Organizational Authority
39(4)
The Chief Executive Officer
41(1)
The Top-Management Team
42(1)
Other Managers
43(1)
An Agency Theory Perspective
43(2)
The Moral Hazard Problem
44(1)
Solving the Agency Problem
44(1)
Top Managers and Organizational Ethics
45(8)
Sources of Organizational Ethics
48(2)
Why Do Ethical Rules Develop?
50(1)
Why Does Unethical Behavior Occur?
51(2)
Creating an Ethical Organization
53(2)
Designing an Ethical Structure and Control System
53(1)
Creating an Ethical Culture
54(1)
Supporting the Interests of Stakeholder Groups
54(1)
Summary
55(1)
Discussion Questions
55(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
55(2)
Practicing Organizational Theory
55(1)
Making the Connection #2
56(1)
The Ethical Dimension #2
56(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #2
56 (1)
Assignment
56(1)
Case for Analysis Ethical Stances at Johnson & Johnson and Dow Corning
57 (1)
References
58
Organizational Insight
2.1 The Increasing Power of Institutional Investors
33(1)
2.2 Southwest Airlines Serves Its Customers
34(1)
2.3 Should Doctors Own Stock in Hospitals?
35(12)
2.4 The Use of Animals in Cosmetics Testing
47(2)
2.5 Is It Right to Use Child Labor?
49(11)
Chapter 3 Managing in a Changing Global Environment
60(35)
What Is the Organizational Environment?
60(10)
The Specific Environment
62(2)
The General Environment
64(2)
Sources of Uncertainty in the Organizational Environment
66(4)
Resource Dependence Theory
70(1)
Interorganizational Strategies for Managing Resource Dependencies
71(1)
Strategies for Managing Symbiotic Resource Interdependencies
72 (6)
Developing a Good Reputation
72(1)
Co-Optation
73(1)
Strategic Alliances
74(4)
Merger and Takeover
78(1)
Strategies for Managing Competitive Resource Interdependencies
78 (4)
Collusion and Cartels
79(1)
Third-Party Linkage Mechanisms
80(1)
Strategic Alliances
81(1)
Merger and Takeover
81(1)
Transaction Cost Theory
82(7)
Sources of Transaction Costs
82(2)
Transaction Costs and Linkage Mechanisms
84(1)
Bureaucratic Costs
85(1)
Using Transaction Cost Theory to Choose an Interorganizational Strategy
85(4)
Summary
89(1)
Discussion Questions
90(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
90(2)
Practicing Organizational Theory: Protecting Your Domain
90(1)
Making the Connection #3
91(1)
The Ethical Dimension #3
91(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #3
91 (1)
Assignment
91(1)
Case for Analysis How Ford Manages Its Environment
92 (1)
References
93
Focus on New Information Technology
Amazon.com, Part 2
69(1)
Managerial Implications
Analyzing the Environment
70(12)
Resource Dependence Theory
82
Organizational Insight
3.1 GE's U.S.Managers Stumble in Hungary
66(5)
3.2 Might Microsoft
71(15)
3.3 Ekco and Its Suppliers
86(2)
3.4 Li & Fung's Global Supply Chain Management
88(7)
PART II ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN 95(206)
Chapter 4 Basic Challenges of Organizational Design
95(34)
Differentiation
95(8)
Organizational Roles
98(1)
Subunits: Functions and Divisions
99(1)
Differentiation at the B.A.R. and Grille
100(1)
Vertical and Horizontal Differentiation
101(1)
Organizational Design Challenges
102(1)
Balancing Differentiation and Integration
103(5)
Integration and Integrating Mechanisms
103(5)
Differentiation versus Integration
108(1)
Balancing Centralization and Decentralization
108(3)
Centralization versus Decentralization of Authority
109(2)
Balancing Standardization and Mutual Adjustment
111(4)
Formalization: Written Rules
112(1)
Socialization: Understood Norms
112(1)
Standardization versus Mutual Adjustment
113(2)
Mechanistic and Organic Organizational Structures
115 (9)
Mechanistic Structures
115(1)
Organic Structures
116(2)
The Contingency Approach to Organizational Design
118(1)
Lawrence and Lorsch on Differentiation, Integration, and the Environment
119(2)
Burns and Stalker on Organic versus Mechanistic Structures and the Environment
121(3)
Summary
124 (1)
Discussion Questions
125(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
125(1)
Practicing Organizational Theory: Growing Pains
125(1)
Making the Connection #4
125(1)
The Ethical Dimension #4
125(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #4
126 (1)
Assignment
126(1)
Case for Analysis Where Should Decisions Be Made?
126 (1)
References
127
Focus on New Information Technology
Amazon.com, Part 3
114
Managerial Implications
Differentiation
103(11)
The Design Challenges
114
Organizational Insight
4.1 B.A.R. And Grille Restaurant
96(11)
4.2 Integration at Amgen
107(3)
4.3 Centralize or Decentralize?
110(7)
4.4 Sony's Magic Touch
117(5)
4.5 McDonald's Changing Environment
122(1)
4.6 Wal-Mart's Race to the Top
123(6)
Chapter 5 Designing Organizational Structure: Authority and Control
129(31)
Authority: How and Why Vertical Differentiation Occurs
129(10)
The Emergence of the Hierarchy
130(1)
Size and Height Limitations
130(3)
Problems with Tall Hierarchies
133(2)
The Parkinson's Law Problem
135(1)
The Ideal Number of Hierarchical Levels: The Minimum Chain of Command
136 (1)
Span of Control
136(3)
Control: Factors Affecting the Shape of the Hierarchy
139(5)
Horizontal Differentiation
139(3)
Centralization
142(1)
Standardization
143(1)
The Principles of Bureaucracy
144(7)
The Advantages of Bureaucracy
149(1)
Management by Objectives
150(1)
The Influence of the Informal Organization
151 (2)
IT, Empowerment, and Self-Managed Teams
153 (2)
Summary
155(1)
Discussion Questions
156(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
Practicing Organizational Theory: How to Design a Hierarchy
156(1)
Making the Connection #5
156(1)
The Ethical Dimension #5
156(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #5
156 (1)
Assignment
156(1)
Case for Analysis A New Approach at Hewlett-Packard
157 (1)
References
158
Managerial Implications
Authority and Control
144(9)
Using Bureaucracy to Benefit the Organization
153
Organizational Insight
5.1 The Shack-Up at Du Pont
134(3)
5.2 Using the Hierarchy to Promote Creativity at EMI
137(5)
5.3 Union Pacific Decentralizes
142(6)
5.4 Never Underestimate the Power of Rules
148(4)
5.5 Wildcate Strikes in the Gypsum Plant
152 (8)
Chapter 6 Designing Organizational Structure: Specialization and Coordination
160(35)
Functional structure
160(4)
Advantages of a Functional structure
162(1)
Control Problems in a Functional Structure
163(1)
Solving Control Problems with a Functional Structure
164(1)
From Functional Structure to Divisional Structure
164(3)
Moving to a Divisional Structure
167(1)
Divisional Structure I: Three Kinds of Product Structure
167(12)
Product Division Structure
168(2)
Multidivisional Structure
170(6)
Product Team Structure
176(3)
Divisional Structure II: Geographic structure
179(1)
Divisional Structure III: Market Structure
180(3)
Matrix Structure
183(4)
Advantages of a Matrix Structure
185(1)
Disadvantages of a Matrix Structure
185(1)
The Multidivisional Matrix Structure
186(1)
Network Structure and the Boundaryless Organization
187(3)
Advantages of Network Structures
188(1)
Disadvantages of Network Structures
189(1)
The Boundaryless Organization
189(1)
Summary
190(1)
Discussion Questions
191(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
Practicing Organizational Theory: Which New Organizational Structure?
191 (1)
Making the Connection #6
191(1)
The Ethical Dimension #6
191(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #6
191 (1)
Assignment
192(1)
Case for Analysis A New Caterpillar Emerges
192 (1)
References
193
Focus on New Information Technology
Managerial Implications
Functional Structure
165(18)
Changing Organizational Structure
183
Amazon.com, Part 4
161(13)
Organizational Insight
6.1 Creating GM's Multidivisional Structure
174(4)
6.2 Iacocca Pioneers Chrysler's Team Structure
178(3)
6.3 Wal-Mart Goes National, Then Global
181(1)
6.4 Tailoring Structure to Customers
182(13)
Chapter 7 Creating and Managing Organizational Culture
195(32)
What Is Organizational Culture?
195(5)
How Is an Organization's Culture Transmitted to Its Members?
200(5)
Socialization and Socialization Tactics
201(2)
Stories, Ceremonies, and Organizational Language
203(2)
Where Does Organizational Culture Come From?
205(11)
Characteristics of People Within the Organization
207(2)
Organizational Ethics
209(2)
Property Rights
211(3)
Organizational Structure
214(2)
Can Organizational Culture Be Managed?
216(1)
Social Responsibility
217(4)
Approaches to Social Responsibility
218(1)
Why Be Socially Responsible?
219(2)
Summary
221(1)
Discussion Questions
222(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
Practicing Organizational Theory: Developing a Service Culture
222(1)
Making the Connection #7
222(1)
The Ethical Dimension #7
223(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #7
223 (1)
Assignment
223(1)
Case for Analysis A Tale of Two Cultures
223 (1)
References
224
Managerial Implications
Analyzing Organizational Culture
206(11)
Designing Organizational Culture
217
Organizational Insight
7.1 How Global Culture Affects Organizational Culture
198(1)
7.2 Mergers and Cultures
199(5)
7.3 Triad Systems Builds a Culture Based on Success
204(2)
7.4 siteROCK's Military Management Culture
206(2)
7.5 Procter & Gamble's Culture Is Hard to Change
208(2)
7.6 Apple Juice of Sugar Water?
210(2)
7.7 A Clash of Two Cultures
212(2)
7.8 Bimba Changes Its Property Rights System
214(6)
7.9 Ben and Jerry's Ethical Culture
220(7)
Chapter 8 Organizational Design and Strategy in a Changing Global Environment
Strategy and the Environment
227(6)
Sources of Core Competences
229(1)
Global Expansion and Core Competences
230(2)
Four Levels of Strategy
232(1)
Functional-Level Strategy
233(5)
Strategies to Lower Costs or Differentiate Products
233(2)
Functional-Level Strategy and Structure
235(2)
Functional-Level Strategy and Culture
237(1)
Business-Level Strategy
238(8)
Strategies to Lower Costs or Differentiate Products
239(2)
Focus Strategy
241(1)
Business-Level Strategy and Structure
241(3)
Business-Level Strategy and Culture
244(2)
Corporate-Level Strategy
246(7)
Vertical Integration
247(1)
Related Diversification
248(1)
Unrelated Diversification
249(1)
Corporate-Level Strategy and Structure
249(3)
Corporate-Level Strategy and Culture
252(1)
Implementing Strategy Across Countries
253(6)
Implementing a Multidomestic Strategy
254(2)
Implementing International Strategy
256(1)
Implementing Global Strategy
257(1)
Implementing Transnational Strategy
257(2)
Summary
259(1)
Discussion Questions
259(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
Practicing Organizational Theory: What Kind of Supermarket?
260(1)
Making the Connection #8
260(1)
The Ethical Dimension #8
260(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #8
260 (1)
Assignment
260(1)
Case for Analysis Levi Strauss Goes Global
261 (1)
References
262
Focus on New Information Technology
Amazon.com, Part 5
240
Managerial Implications
Functional-Level Strategy
239(7)
Business-Level Strategy
246(7)
Corporate-Level Strategy
253
Organizational Insight
8.1 PepsiCo Chooses an New Structure
244(1)
8.2 How Culture Derailed the Marger Between AHP and Monsanto
245(6)
8.3 Hitachi Ltd.
251(13)
Chapter 9 Organizational Design, Competences, and Technology
264 (37)
What Is Technology?
264(2)
Technology and Organizational Effectiveness
266(2)
Technical Complexity: The Theory of Joan Woodward
268(7)
Small-Batch and Unit Technology
269(1)
Large-Batch and Mass Production Technology
270(1)
Continuous-Process Technology
271(1)
Technical Complexity and Organizational Structure
271(3)
The Technological Imperative
274(1)
Routine Tasks and Complex Tasks: The Theory of Charles Perrow
275(4)
Task Variability and Task Analyzability
275(1)
Four Types of Technology
276(2)
Routine Technology and Organizational Structure
278(1)
Nonroutine Technology and Organizational Structure
279(1)
Task Interdependence: The Theory of James D. Thompson
279(7)
Mediating Technology and Pooled Interdependence
280(2)
Long-Linked Technology and Sequential Interdependence
282(1)
Intensive Technology and Reciprocal Interdependence
283(3)
From Mass Production to Advanced Manufacturing Technology
286(3)
Advanced Manufacturing Technology: Innovations in Materials Technology 289
Computer-Aided Design
289(1)
Computer-Aided Materials Management
290(1)
Just-in-Time Inventory systems
291(1)
Flexible Manufacturing Technology and Computer Integrated Manufacturing
292 (2)
Summary
294(1)
Discussion Questions
295(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
Practicing Organizational Theory: Choosing a Technology
295(1)
Making the Connection #9
296(1)
The Ethical Dimension #9
296(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #9
296 (1)
Assignment
296(1)
Case for Analysis The Shape of Things to Come
297 (1)
References
298
Managerial Implications
Analyzing Technology
287
Organizational Insight
9.1 Progressive Manufacture at Ford
265(19)
9.2 USAA Improving the Delivery of Intangible Services
284(2)
9.3 A New Approach at Hewlett-Packard
286(7)
9.4 Motorola's Factory of the Future
293(8)
PART III ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE 301(158)
Chapter 10 Types and Forms of Organizational Change
301(37)
What Is Organizational Change?
301(2)
Targets of Change
302(1)
Forces for and Resistance to Organizational Change
303 (7)
Forces for Change
303(2)
Resistances to Change
305(1)
Organization-Level Resistance to Change
306(1)
Group-Level Resistance to Change
307(1)
Individual-Level Resistance to Change
308(1)
Lewin's Force Field Theory of Change
308(2)
Evolutionary and Revolutionary Change in Organizations
310(1)
Developments in Evolutionary Change
310(6)
Sociotechnical Systems Theory
310(1)
Total Quality Management
311(2)
Flexible Workers and Flexible Work Teams
313(3)
Developments in Revolutionary Change
316 (6)
Reengineering
316(4)
Restructuring
320(1)
Innovation
321(1)
Managing Change: Action Research
322(5)
Diagnosing the Organization
322(2)
Determining the Desired Future State
324(1)
Implementing Action
324(1)
Evaluating the Action
325(1)
Institutionalizing Action Research
326(1)
Organizational Development
327(5)
OD Techniques to Deal with Resistance to Change
327(2)
OD Techniques to Promote Change
329(3)
Summary
332(1)
Discussion Questions
333(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
333(1)
Practicing Organizational Theory: Managing Change
333(1)
Making the Connection #10
333(1)
The Ethical Dimension #10
333(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #10
334(1)
Case for Analysis Sears Changes Again and Again
334 (1)
References
335
Managerial Implications
Forces for and Resistances to Change
309(17)
Designing a Plan for Change
326
Organizational Insight
10.1 Nike, Reebok, Adidas, and the Sweatshops
306(7)
10.2 Citibank uses TQM to Increase Customer Loyalty
313(2)
10.3 Flexible Work Teams at Globe
315(1)
10.4 GM and Toyota Give Plant a New Lease on Life
316(3)
10.5 How to Stay on Top in the Greeting Card Business
319(9)
10.6 Competitive Advantage: Achieving Change Through Empowering Work Groups
328(10)
Chapter 11 Organizational Transformations: Birth, Growth, Decline, and Death
338 (29)
The Organizational Life Cycle
338(1)
Organizational Birth
339(3)
Developing a Plan for a New Business
340(2)
A Population Ecology Model of Organizational Birth
342 (5)
Number of Births
342(2)
Survival Strategies
344(1)
The Process of Natural Selection
345(2)
The Institutional Theory of Organizational Growth
347(3)
Organizational Isomorphism
348(1)
Disadvantages of Isomorphism
349(1)
Greiner's Model of Organizational Growth
350(4)
Stage 1: Growth Through Creativity
351(1)
Stage 2: Growth Through Direction
351(1)
Stage 3: Growth Through Delegation
352(1)
Stage 4: Growth Through Coordination
353(1)
Stage 5: Growth Through Collaboration
354(1)
Organizational Decline and Death
354(7)
Organizational Inertia
355(2)
Changes in the Environment
357(1)
Weitzel and Jonsson' s Model of Organizational Decline
358(3)
Summary
361(1)
Discussion Questions
362(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
363(1)
Practicing Organizational Theory: Growing Pains
363(1)
Making the Connection #11
363(1)
The Ethical Dimension #11
363(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #11
363 (1)
Assignment
363(1)
Case for Analysis The Body Shop Reaches Middle Age
364 (1)
References
365
Focus on New Information Technology
Amazon.com, Part 6
347(8)
Managerial Implications
Organizational Birth and Growth
355(6)
Organizational Decline
361
Organizational Insight
11.1 General Dynamics Goes from Weakness to Strength
359(8)
Chapter 12 Decision Making, Learning, Knowledge Management, and Information Technology
367 (36)
Organizational Decision Making
367(1)
Models of Organizational Decision Making
368(8)
The Rational Model
368(2)
The Carnegie Model
370(2)
The Incrementalist Model
372(1)
The Unstructured Model
372(2)
The Garbage Can Model
374(2)
The Nature of Organizational Learning
376(7)
Types of Organizational Learning
376(1)
Levels of Organizational Learning
377(3)
Knowledge Management and Information Technology
380(3)
Factors Affecting Organizational Learning
383(7)
Organizational Learning and Cognitive Structures
384(1)
Types of Cognitive Biases
385(1)
Cognitive Dissonance
385(1)
Illusion of Control
386(1)
Frequency and Representativeness
387(1)
Projection and Ego Defensiveness
388(1)
Escalation of Commitment
389(1)
Improving Decision Making and Learning
390(6)
Strategies for Organizational Learning
390(1)
Utilizing Game Theory
391(2)
Nature of the Top-Management Team
393(2)
Devil's Advocacy and Dialectical Inquiry
395(1)
Collateral Organizational structure
396(1)
Summary
396(1)
Discussion Questions
397(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
398(1)
Practicing Organizational Theory: Store Learning
398(1)
Making the Connection #12
398(1)
The Ethical Dimension #12
398(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #12
398 (1)
Assignment
398(1)
Case for Analysis Encouraging Learning at Baxter International
399 (1)
References
400
Managerial Implications
Decision Making and Learning
396
Organizational Insight
12.1 Should GE Make or Buy Washing Machines?
373(2)
12.2 Microsoft Is Not All-Seeing After All
375(6)
12.3 Accenture's Knowledge Management System
381(7)
12.4 Mistakes and More Mistakes at the E-grocers
388(15)
Chapter 13 Innovation, Intrapreneurship, and Creativity
403(27)
Innovation and Technological Change
403(7)
The Product Life Cycle
406(3)
Innovation, Intrapreneurship, and Creativity
409(1)
Managing the Innovation Process
410(12)
Project Management
411(2)
Stage-Gate Development Funnel
413(2)
Using Cross Functional Teams and a Product Team Structure
415 (2)
Team Leadership
417(1)
Skunk Works and New Venture Divisions
417 (3)
Joint Ventures
420(1)
Creating a Culture for Innovation
420(2)
Innovation and Information Technology
422(3)
Innovation and Information Synergies
423(2)
IT and Organizational Structure and Culture
425(1)
Summary
425(1)
Discussion Questions
426(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
Practicing Organizational Theory: Managing Innovation
426(1)
Making the Connection #13
426(1)
The Ethical Dimension #13
426(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #13
427(1)
Case for Analysis Big Changes at Boeing
427 (1)
References
428
Focus on New Information Technology
Amazon.com, Part 7
424
Managerial Implications
Innovation
422
Organizational Insight
13.1 Innovation at The Gap
408(10)
13.2 Championing the Mustang
418(1)
13.3 Too Much Innovation at Lucent
419(11)
Chapter 14 Managing Conflict, Power, and Politics
430(29)
What Is Organizational Conflict?
430(3)
Pondy's Model of Organizational Conflict
433(5)
Stage 1: Latent Conflict
434(2)
Stage 2: Perceived Conflict
436(1)
Stage 3: Felt Conflict
437(1)
Stage 4: Manifest Conflict
437(1)
Stage 5: Conflict Aftermath
438(1)
Managing Conflict: Conflict Resolution strategies
438(3)
Acting at the Level of Structure
439(1)
Acting at the Level of Attitudes and Individuals
439(2)
What Is Organizational Power?
441(1)
Sources of Organizational Power
441(6)
Authority
442(2)
Control over Resources
444(1)
Control over Information
444(1)
Nonsubstitutability
445(1)
Centrality
445(1)
Control over Uncertainty
446(1)
Unobtrusive Power: Controlling the Premises of Decision Making
446(1)
Using Power: Organizational Politics
447(6)
Tactics for Playing Politics
447(4)
The Costs and Benefits of Organizational Politics
451(2)
Summary
453(1)
Discussion Questions
453(1)
Organizational Theory in Action
454(1)
Practicing Organizational Theory: Managing Conflict
454(1)
Making the Connection #14
454(1)
The Ethical Dimension #14
454(1)
Analyzing the Organization: Design Module #14
454 (1)
Assignment
454(1)
Case for Analysis The Shake-Up in GM's Hierarchy
455 (1)
References
456
Managerial Implications
Conflict
441(11)
Power and Politics
452
Organizational Insight
14.1 Conflict Causes Slow Change At Kodak
435(1)
14.2 How Rewards Produced Conflict at CS First Boston
436(13)
14.3 Power Struggles and Corporate Greed at WorldCom
449 (10)
CASE STUDIES 459(120)
Case 1 United Products, Inc.
459 (11)
Jeffrey C. Shuman
Case 2 The Paradoxical Twins: Acme and Omega Electronics
470 (5)
John F. Veiga
Case 3 Continental Can Company of Canada, Ltd.
475 (12)
Paul R. Lawrence
Case 4 TRW Systems Group (A and B Condensed)
487 (17)
Paul K. Thompson
Case 5 Texana Petroleum Corporation
504(8)
Jay W. Lorsch, Paul R. Lawrence, and James A. Garrison
Case 6 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.
512 (12)
Frank Shipper and Charles C. Manx
Case 7 Three Roads to Innovation
524 (3)
Ronald A. Mitsch
Case 8 The Scaffold Plank Incident
527 (3)
Stewart C. Malone and Brad Brown
Case 9 Beer and Wine Industries: Bartles & Jaymes
530 (8)
Per V. Jenster
Case 10 Bennett's Machine Shop, Inc.
538 (14)
Arthur Sharplin
Case 11 Southwest Airlines
552(5)
Case 12 Pharmacia and Upjohn
557 (7)
Gareth R. Jones
Case 13 Philips NV
564 (3)
Charles W. L. Hill
Case 14 "Ramrod" Stockwell
567 (3)
Charles Perrow
Case 15 Rondell Data Corporation
570 (9)
John A. Seeger
COMPANY INDEX 579(4)
NAME INDEX 583(2)
SUBJECT INDEX 585


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