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Outcome-Informed Evidence-Based Practice

by ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780205816286

ISBN10:
0205816282
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
9/21/2011
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $60.00

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Summary

Provides practical ways to measure and monitor client progress. Part of Advancing Core Competencies Series, a unique series that helps students taking advanced social work courses apply CSWE's core competencies and practice behaviors examples to specialized fields of practice. Outcome-Informed Evidence Based Practice shows students practical ways to measure and monitor client progress and use this feedback to help clients achieve their goals. Outcome Informed Evidence Based Practiceplaces emphasis on social workers who provide direct services to clients, not only in clinical settings, but in a broad array of other settings such as schools, health care, social service agencies, residential facilities, and more. Using case examples in almost every chapter, this text highlights the diversity of clients encountered by social workers, providing real-world contexts for discussing chapter concepts. This text is also useful for psychologists, psychiatrists, counselors, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, and other allied health care and social service professionals. Learning Goals Upon completing the book, readers should be able to: Help clients make the best decisions by measuring and monitoring client progress, and modifying interventions accordingly, Graph, analyze, and interpret their client's progress Recognize social workers should systematically measure and monitor their clients' outcomes at regular frequent intervals Identify measurement issues that influence the quality of the information collected by them and their client Note:MySocialWorkLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySocialWorkLab, please visit:www.mysocialworklab.comor you can purchase a valuepack of the text + MySocialWorkLab (at no additional cost). VP: 0205206859

Author Biography

John G. Orme is a professor at the University of Tennessee in the College of Social Work. He has an M.S.W. and Ph.D. in social work from Washington University in St. Louis. He also completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship on the Delivery of Mental Health Services, University of Chicago, Department of Behavioral Sciences, Committee on Methodology of Behavioral Research. Prior to joining the University of Tennessee faculty he was a faculty member in social work at Louisiana State University and at the University of Maryland. He has taught graduate courses related to outcome-informed practice since 1985, as well as M.S.W. and Ph.D. level courses on research methodology and statistics. Dr. Orme's interests include outcome-informed practice, measurement development, applied statistical and methodological issues, and foster care. He has published numerous articles in refereed social work and interdisciplinary journals on these topics, and he is a co-author of five editions of Evaluating Practice: Guidelines for the Accountable Professional. His most recent book, co-authored with Terri Combs Orme, is Multiple Regression with Discrete Dependent Variables.

 

Terri Combs-Orme is a Professor in the College of Social Work, University of Tennessee. She earned her MSSW at the University of Texas at Arlington and her PhD at Washington University in St. Louis. Before joining the University of Tennessee faculty she taught at Louisiana State University, the University of Maryland, and The Johns Hopkins University. She teaches courses in lifespan development and writing critical literature reviews at the BSW, MSSW, and PhD levels. Dr. Combs-Orme’s interests include infant brain development and parenting, and she is a Visiting Fellow at The Urban Child Institute in Memphis, TN. She has published numerous articles in social work, public health, and medical journals. Her most recent book, co-authored with John Orme, is Multiple Regression with Discrete Dependent Variables.

Table of Contents

IN THIS SECTION:

1.)    BRIEF

2.)    COMPREHENSIVE


 

BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS:

 

Part I: Foundations of Outcome-Informed Practice

 

Chapter 1: Outcome-Informed Practice in Practice: Two Case Examples

Chapter 2: Introduction to Outcome-Informed Practice

Chapter 3: Why Evaluate Your Evidence-Based Practice?  

Chapter 4: Assessment: The Early Stages of Outcome-Informed Practice

 

Part II: Monitoring and Interpreting Client Progress

 

Chapter 5: Charting Your Client’s Progress

Chapter 6: Visually Interpreting Your Client’s Progress

Chapter 7: Single-Case Designs

 

Part III: Practical Methods for Measuring Client Progress

 

Chapter 8: Foundations of Evidence-Based Outcome Measurement

Chapter 9: Standardized Scales

Chapter 10: Individualized Rating Scales

Chapter 11: Behavioral Observation

Chapter 12: Self-Monitoring

Chapter 13: Summing Up


 

COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS:

 

Preface and Acknowledgements

 

Part I: Foundations of Outcome-Informed Practice

 

Chapter 1: Outcome-Informed Practice in Practice: Two Case Examples

Case 1: A Foster Child’s Provocative Behavior

Case 2: A Depressed University Student

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 2: Introduction to Outcome-Informed Practice

Basic Concepts of Outcome-Informed Practice

Summing Up

Intervention Research and Outcome-Informed Practice

Single-Case Designs

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 3: Why Evaluate Your Evidence-Based Practice?

Why: To Obtain the Best Client Outcomes

Why: To Avoid Natural Biases

Why: To Improve Clinical Decision-Making

Why: To Prevent Client Deterioration

Why: To Bridge The Gaps In Evidence-Based Practice

Why: To Improve Your Relationships With Your Clients

Why: To Enhance Your Development As a Practitioner

Why: To Be Accountable

Why: Last, But Not Least: To Meet Your Ethical Obligations

Conclusions

Chapter Review

 

Chapter 4: Assessment: The Early Stages of Outcome-Informed Practice

Outcome-Informed Practice, the Scientific Method and Critical Thinking

Case Conceptualization

Diagnosis: A Limited but Often Necessary Tool

Conclusions

Chapter Review

 

Part II: Monitoring and Interpreting Client Progress

 

Chapter 5: Charting Your Client’s Progress

Constructing Good Single-Case-Design Line Graphs

Graphing Multiple Data Series

Using Computers to Construct Single-Case Design Line Graphs

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 6: Visually Interpreting Your Client’s Progress

Identifying Change and Making Decisions

Visual Analysis of Graphed Data

Within Phase Patterns

Limitations of Visual Analysis

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 7: Single-Case Designs

Did Your Client Change?

Did Your Intervention Cause Client Change?

Multiple Baseline Designs

Variations on a Theme

Follow-Up

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Part III: Practical Methods for Measuring Client Progress

 

Chapter 8: Foundations of Evidence-Based Outcome Measurement

Measurement

Measurement Error

Correlation

Reliability

Validity

Relationship between Reliability and Validity

Client Characteristics

Decide Who, Where, When, and How Often to Collect Data

Engage and Prepare Clients

Is the Measure Practical and Does it Contribute to Favorable Outcomes?

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 9: Standardized Scales

Overview of Standardized Scales

Examples of Standardized Scales

Evaluating and Selecting Standardized Scales

Decide Who, Where, When, and How Often to Collect Data

Engage and Prepare the Client

Scoring and Interpreting Standardized Scale Scores

Using Standardized Scales to Determine Clinically Significant Improvement

Using Standardized Scales to Evaluate Expected Treatment Response

Single-Item Global Standardized Scales

Special Considerations of Culture and Ethnicity

Using Standardized Scales in Groups

Computer Management of Standardized Scales

Advantages and Precautions in Using Standardized Scales

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 10: Individualized Rating Scales

Constructing Individualized Rating Scales

Decide Who, Where, When, and How Often to Collect Data

Engaging and Preparing the Client

Advantages and Precautions in Using Individualized Rating Scales

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 11: Behavioral Observation

Purposes

Deciding What Dimensions of Behavior to Measure

Deciding Whether to Collect Contextual Information

Deciding When and Where to Observe Behavior

Time Samples

Situation Samples

Analogue Situations

Using Practical Instruments for Recording Observations

Ensuring and Verifying the Accuracy of Observations

Setting Goals and Objectives

Advantages and Precautions in using Behavioral Observation

Conclusions

Chapter Review 

 

Chapter 12: Self-Monitoring

Purpose

Deciding What to Measure

Deciding When and Where to Measure

Selecting Instruments for Self-Monitoring

Engaging and Preparing the Client

Ensuring and Verifying the Accuracy of Self-Monitoring

Setting Goals and Objectives

Advantages and Precautions in Using Self-Monitoring

Conclusions

Chapter Review

 

Chapter 13: Summing Up

Measure

Monitor

Modify If Needed

 

Glossary

Appendix A: Selected Standardized Scales

Appendix B: Online and Published Resources for Standardized Scales

References

Author Index

Subject Index



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