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Philosophic Classics, Volume I: Ancient Philosophy,9780130485564

Philosophic Classics, Volume I: Ancient Philosophy

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130485564

ISBN10:
013048556X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $60.00
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Summary

For courses in Ancient Philosophy. This anthology in Ancient Western philosophy focuses on the writings of the most important Greek philosophers, along with sections from some of their Roman followers. It features the best available translations of texts-complete works or complete selections of works-introductions to each philosopher; an abundance of drawings, diagrams, photographs; and a timeline.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
BEFORE SOCRATES 1(70)
The Milesians
6(5)
Thales
6(2)
Anaximander
8(2)
Anaximenes
10(1)
Three Solitary Figures
11(8)
Pythagoras
11(3)
Xenophanes
14(1)
Heraclitus
15(4)
The Eleatics
19(12)
Parmenides
19(4)
Zeno of Elea
23(5)
Melissus
28(3)
The Pluralists
31(12)
Empedocles
31(5)
Anaxagoras
36(3)
Democritus (and Leucippus)
39(4)
Three Sophists
43(6)
Protagoras
43(1)
Gorgias
44(2)
Critias
46(3)
Epilogue: Two Views of Athens
49(12)
Pericles (as reported by Thucydides), Funeral Oration
52(4)
Thucydides, The Melian Conference
56(5)
Epilogue: Aspasia
61(4)
Sources of the Fragments
65(6)
SOCRATES 71(1)
PLATO 71(240)
Euthyphro
76(12)
Apology
88(17)
Crito
105(9)
Phaedo
114(43)
Meno
157(24)
Symposium
181(35)
Republic (Books I, 336b-349b, 350d-354b; II, 357a-362c, 367e-376e; III, 412b-417b: IV, 427d-445e; V, complete: 449-180a; VI-VII, 502c-521b)
216(72)
Parmenides (127-135)
288(7)
Theaetetus (selections)
295(12)
Timaeus (27d-346)
307(4)
ARISTOTLE 311(142)
Categories (Chapters 1-5)
315(5)
On Interpretation (Chapters 1-9)
320(5)
Posterior Analytics (Books I, 1-2; II, 19)
325(4)
Physics (Book II complete)
329(11)
Metaphysics (Books I and XII complete)
340(25)
On the Soul (Books II, 1-3; III, 4-5)
365(6)
Nichomachean Ethics (Books I-II; III, 1-5; IV, 3; VI-VII; X, 6-8)
371(70)
Politics (Books I, 1-2; III, 6-9; IV, 11-12; VII, 3b-4, 9)
441(12)
HELLENISTIC AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY 453
Epicurus
457
Letter to Herodotus
459
Letter to Menoeceus
473
Principal Doctrines
477
Lucretius
481
On the Nature of the Universe (Books Two, 216-292; Three, through 842)
482
The Early Stoa: Zeno of Citium and Cleanthes
496
Zeno of Citium (selections from Diogenes Laertius)
498
Hymn to Zeus
507
Epictetus
509
Encheiridion (Manual)
510
Marcus Aurelius
523
Meditations (Book IV)
524
Pyrrho and Sextus Empiricus
532
Outlines of Pyrrhonism (Book I, 1-15)
533
Plotinus
540
Enneads (I, Tractate 6; V, Tractate 1, 1-12; V, Tractate 3, 12.9-end)
542

Excerpts

The philosophers of ancient Greece have fascinated thinking persons for centuries. Their writings have been one of the key influences on the development of Western civilization, beginning with the fragmentary statements of the Pre-Socratics, moving to the all-embracing systems of Plato and Aristotle, and culminating in the practical advice of the Hellenistic writers, Greek philosophers have defined the questions and suggested many of the answers for subsequent generations. As the great Greek statesman, Pericles, sagely predicted, "Future ages will wonder at us, as the present age wonders at us now." This volume in thePhilosophic Classicsseries includes the writings of the most important Greek philosophers, along with selections from some of their Roman followers. In choosing texts for this volume I have tried wherever possible to follow three principles: (1) to use complete works or, where more appropriate, complete sections of works (2) in clear translations (3) of texts central to the thinker's philosophy or widely accepted as part of the "canon." To make the works more accessible to students, most footnotes treating textual matters (variant readings, etc.) have been omitted and all Greek words have been transliterated and put in angle brackets. In addition, each thinker is introduced by a brief essay composed of three sections: (1) biographical (a glimpse of the life), (2) philosophical (a resume of the philosopher's thought), and (3) bibliographical (suggestions for further reading). For this edition a number of small changes have been made including the addition of Critias and Aspasia to the Pre-Socratics and the section on the "Ring of Gyges" from Plato'sRepublic.The section on the Hellenistic and Roman philosophers has been restructured to follow the development of the different schools and the translations of Plato, Apology and Crito, Lucretius,On the Nature of the Universe,and Plotinus, Enneads, have all been changed. Those who use this first volume in a one-term course in ancient philosophy will find more material here than can easily fit a normal semester. But this embarrassment of riches gives teachers some choice and, for those who offer the same course year after year, an opportunity to change the menu.


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