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Play and Child Development,9780136856030

Play and Child Development

by ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780136856030

ISBN10:
0136856039
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $52.00
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Summary

With significantly expanded discussions on key topics, here is a revised edition of the popular early childhood book that, more than any other book on the market, ties play directly to child development. Through a seamless blend of research, theory, and practical applications, its comprehensive coverage addresses the full spectrum of play-related topics. The book analyzes play theories and play therapy; presents a history of play; and discusses current play trends. It explores ways to create safe play environments for all children, and how to weave play into school curricula. Finally, the authors examine the role of adults in leading and encouraging children' s natural tendencies toward learning by playing. Special coverage includes a full chapter on play and children with disabilities, and the value of field trips in supporting learning. For pre-service and in-service, pre-school and primary grade teachers.

Table of Contents

Play's History: Ideas, Beliefs, and Activities
2(32)
Philosophy and Ideas Over the Years
7(18)
The Ancients and Play
7(2)
Enlightenment and Romantic Thought on Play
9(7)
On the Nature of Play: Scientific Approaches
16(4)
The Modern Era of Children's Play
20(5)
Emerging Issues
25(1)
Summary
26(1)
Key Terms
27(1)
Study Questions
27(1)
References
28(4)
Theory as Lenses on Children's Play
32(44)
Why Study Theories?
35(1)
Current Theories of Play
36(2)
Dominant Contemporary Theories
38(19)
Psychoanalysis: Emotional Motives for Play
39(3)
Communications and Play
42(3)
Cognitive Views
45(7)
Social Play
52(4)
Creativity in Play
56(1)
Emerging Theories of Play
57(1)
Play through Different Lenses
58(1)
Beliefs and Philosophy
59(6)
A Model of Classroom Play
59(6)
Issues Shaping Play Theory
65(1)
The Need for Theory About Unique Contexts
65(1)
Interdisciplinarity
65(1)
Teacher's Thinking About Play
66(1)
Summary
66(1)
Key Terms
67(1)
Study Questions
68(1)
References
68(8)
Neuroscience, Play Deprivation, and Pay-for-Play
76(40)
Neuroscience, Play and Child Development
78(10)
Emergence of Neuroscience
79(2)
High-Tech Brain Imaging
81(1)
Organization of the Brain
81(1)
Effects of Deprivation on Brain Development
82(2)
Neuroscience and Play: Connections
84(1)
Neuroscience and Cognitive Development
85(1)
Neuroscience and Language Development
85(1)
Neuroscience and Social Development
86(1)
Neuroscience and Emotional Development
86(1)
Neuroscience and Physical Development
87(1)
Neuroscience and Educational Practice: Bridging the Gap
88(1)
Brain Research and Child Development
89(2)
Effects of Play Deprivation on Child Development
91(3)
Alternatives to Traditional Spontaneous Play
94(4)
Play and Organized Sports
94(1)
Play and Leisure
95(1)
Play and Entertainment
96(1)
Play and Work
96(2)
Impediments to Spontaneous Play
98(1)
Pay-for-Play and Technology
99(7)
Electronic Play
101(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Software
102(3)
Immersive Reality and Theme Parks
105(1)
Children's Museums
106(1)
Summary
107(1)
Key Terms
108(1)
Study Questions
109(1)
References
110(6)
Play: Infants and Toddlers
116(44)
Physical and Motor Development
118(7)
Characteristics of Physical Development
118(1)
Characteristics of Motor Development
119(1)
Variations in Physical and Motor Development
120(1)
Play and Motor Development
121(1)
Exploration or Play?
122(1)
Adult Roles in Motor Play
123(2)
Cognitive Development
125(6)
Characteristics of Cognitive Development
125(1)
Variations in Cognitive Development
125(2)
Play and Cognitive Development
127(1)
Adult Roles in Cognitive Play
128(3)
Cultural Differences in Parent-Child Pretend Play
131(1)
Language Development
131(5)
Characteristics of Language Development
131(1)
Variations in Language Development
132(2)
The Role of Adults in Language Development
134(1)
Play and Language Development
134(1)
Adult Roles in Language Play
135(1)
Social Development
136(6)
Characteristic of Social Development
136(1)
Variations in Social and Emotional Development
137(1)
The Role of Adults in Social and Emotional Development
138(1)
Play and Social Development
139(1)
Peer Play
140(1)
Adult and Sibling Roles in Social Play
140(2)
Characteristics of Infant and Toddler Play
142(6)
Motor Play
142(1)
Object Play
142(1)
Social Play
142(1)
Symbolic Play
143(1)
Gender Differences in Play
143(1)
Creativity and Play
144(1)
The Integrated Nature of Play
145(3)
Adult Roles in Infant and Toddler Play
148(2)
Toys and Materials for Infant and Toddler Play
150(2)
Summary
152(2)
Key Terms
154(1)
Study Questions
155(1)
References
156(4)
Play in the Preschool Years
160(54)
Physical Development
162(5)
Characteristics of Motor Development
163(1)
Play and Physical Development
164(2)
Adult Roles in Physical Play
166(1)
Cognitive Development
167(7)
Characteristics of Cognitive Development
168(1)
Play and Cognitive Development
169(3)
Characteristics of Cognitive Play
172(1)
Adult Roles in Cognitive Play
173(1)
Language and Literacy Development
174(5)
Characteristics of Language Development
174(1)
Characteristics of Literacy Development
175(1)
Variations in Language and Literacy Development
176(1)
Play and Language and Literacy Development
176(2)
Adult Roles in Language and Literacy Play
178(1)
Social Development
179(11)
Characteristics of Social-Emotional Development
179(3)
Play and Social-Emotional Development
182(1)
Characteristics of Social Play
183(4)
Variations in Social Competence and Play
187(2)
Variations in Sociodramatic Play
189(1)
Adult Roles in Social Play
189(1)
Characteristics of Preschool Play
190(10)
The Integrated Nature of Play
190(1)
Variations in Development and Play
191(5)
Creativity and Play
196(4)
Adult Roles in Preschool Play
200(2)
Toys and Materials for Preschool Play
202(2)
Summary
204(1)
Key Terms
205(1)
Study Questions
205(1)
References
206(8)
Play and the School-Age Child
214(46)
Physical Development
216(7)
Characteristics of Motor Development
217(1)
Play and Physical Development
218(4)
Adult Roles in Physical Play
222(1)
Cognitive Development
223(5)
Characteristics of Cognitive Development
224(1)
Variations in Cognitive Development
225(1)
Play and Cognitive Development
226(1)
Characteristics of Cognitive Play
226(2)
Language and Literacy Development
228(4)
Characteristics of Language Development
228(1)
Characteristics of Literacy Development
229(1)
Language and Literacy Development and Play
229(1)
Adult Roles in Language and Literacy Play
230(2)
Social and Emotional Development
232(8)
Characteristics of Social and Emotional Development
232(2)
Play and Social-Emotional Development
234(1)
Characteristics of Social Play
235(1)
Variations in Social Competence and Play
236(2)
From Sociodramatic Play to Structured Dramatics
238(1)
Adult Roles in Social and Sociodramatic Play
239(1)
Characteristics of School-Age Play
240(7)
The Integrated Nature of Play
240(1)
Gender Differences in Play
240(1)
Rough-and-Tumble Play
241(2)
Chase Games
243(1)
War Toys
244(1)
Creativity and Play
244(3)
Adult Roles in School-Age Play
247(3)
Toys and Materials for School-Age Play
250(1)
Summary
250(2)
Key Terms
252(1)
Study Questions
252(2)
References
254(6)
Culture and Gender in Play
260(34)
The Roots of Cultural Play Research
264(10)
The Work of Helen Schwartzman
264(7)
The Work of Slaughter and Dombrowski
271(2)
Context: Expanding on Developmental Views
273(1)
Cultural Influences on Play
274(10)
Family Influences on Play
275(4)
Differences in Group Play
279(3)
Gender and Play
282(2)
Summary
284(2)
Key Terms
286(1)
Study Questions
286(1)
References
287(7)
Play and the Curriculum
294(46)
Common Elements of Play-based Curriculum
297(4)
Play Centers and Spatial Arrangement
297(2)
Balance of Play Materials
299(1)
Divergent Activities and Creative Expression
300(1)
Schedule of the Day
300(1)
Variations in Approaches to Play
301(4)
Approach 1: Nonplay Curriculum Models
305(4)
Behaviorist Models
306(1)
Didactic Public School Programs
307(2)
Approach 2: The ``Hands-off'' Play Curriculum
309(1)
Approach 3: Narrowly Focused Play Interventions
310(11)
Smilansky's Sociodramatic Play Interventions
311(3)
Isenberg and Jalongo's Creative Drama for the Primary Grades
314(3)
Roskos and Neuman's Literacy Play Model
317(1)
Kamii and DeVries's Group Games
318(3)
Approach 4: Broadly Focused Developmental Models
321(10)
The Bank Street Approach
322(2)
High/Scope
324(1)
Vygotskian Play Models
325(3)
Reggio Emilia Programs
328(3)
Borrowing the Best from Each Approach
331(1)
Key Terms
332(1)
Study Questions
333(1)
References
334(6)
Play and Children with Disabilities
340(46)
The Nature of Disabilities
342(5)
Physical Disabilities
343(1)
At-Risk Children
344(1)
Developmental Delays
345(1)
Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
345(1)
Children with Multiple Disabilities
346(1)
Disabilities and Play
347(13)
Children with Visual Impairments
347(3)
Children with Hearing Impairments
350(1)
Children with Motor Impairments
351(1)
Children at Risk for Developmental Delay or a Disability
352(2)
Developmental Delay
354(5)
Abused and Neglected Children
359(1)
The Role of the Environment
360(9)
Influences of Inclusion Classrooms on Children's Play
360(2)
Adapted Play Environments
362(7)
The Role of Technology
369(3)
Assistive Technology
369(1)
Adapted Toys
370(1)
Interactive Video
371(1)
Computer Technology
372(1)
Creativity and Play
372(1)
Play-Based Assessment
373(2)
Why Play-Based Assessment Is Being Used
374(1)
How Play-Based Assessments Are Conducted
374(1)
Research and Play-Based Assessment
375(1)
Summary
375(2)
Key Terms
377(1)
Study Questions
377(1)
References
378(8)
Introduction to Play Therapy
386(36)
History and Theories of Play Therapy
389(9)
Psychanalysis: Roots of Play Therapy
389(2)
Psychoanalytic Play Therapy
391(2)
Structured Play Therapy
393(2)
Nondirective Therapy
395(1)
Relationship and Child-Centered Play Therapy
396(2)
Conducting Play Therapy
398(5)
Setting Up the Playroom
398(1)
Beginning Play Therapy
399(1)
The Playroom Relationship
400(3)
Settings and Applications
403(9)
Group Play Therapy
403(2)
Interdisciplinary Teams
405(1)
Filial Therapy
405(2)
Hospital Play Therapy
407(2)
Preschools and Elementary Schools
409(2)
Links to Creativity
411(1)
Results of Play Therapy
412(2)
Summary
414(1)
Key Terms
415(1)
Study Questions
415(1)
References
416(6)
Creating Play Environments
422(40)
Then and Now
424(2)
History of Playgrounds in America
426(4)
Indoors Versus Outdoors
430(1)
Playgrounds and Child Development
431(4)
Infant and Toddler Play Environments
432(1)
Preschool Play Environments
432(2)
School-Age Play Environments
434(1)
Creating Play Environments
435(20)
Space
435(4)
Selecting Play Equipment
439(5)
Creating Special Play Places: Nature and Magical Qualities
444(1)
Children's Gardens
445(6)
Making Play Environments Magical
451(4)
Summary
455(1)
Key Terms
456(1)
Study Questions
456(1)
References
457(5)
Child Safety in Public Places
462(46)
Hazards in Public Places
467(3)
Child Development and Safety
470(2)
Toddlers
470(1)
Preschoolers and Early School-Age Children
471(1)
Guidelines/Standards for Safety
472(5)
History of Playground Equipment Standards
473(4)
Promoting Safety Where Children Play
477(19)
Playground Safety
478(5)
Amusement Parks
483(1)
Water Safety
484(3)
Noise
487(1)
Toy Safety
488(1)
Other Hazards
489(4)
Field Trips and Safety: Zoos
493(3)
Child Injuries and Litigation
496(3)
Summary
499(1)
Key Terms
499(1)
Study Questions
500(1)
References
501(4)
General Information: Child Safety
505(3)
Play Leadership in American and European Playgrounds
508(33)
History of Play Leadership in America
511(3)
Play Leadership in Public Parks
511(1)
Play Leadership in Preschools
512(1)
Play Leadership in Public and Private Elementary Schools
513(1)
Theoretical Bases for Adult Intervention in Children's Play
514(6)
Piaget and Constructivism
517(1)
Vygotsky and Social Constructivism
517(1)
Chaos Theory
518(2)
Research Bases for Adult Intervention in Children's Play
520(1)
Practicing Play Leadership
521(6)
Pacific Oaks College Perspectives on Practice
522(1)
Vygotskian Perspectives on Practice
523(1)
Adventure Play and Play Leadership in Europe
523(4)
Conclusions and Recommendations
527(7)
Key Terms
534(1)
Study Questions
534(1)
References
535(6)
Appendix 541(6)
Name Index 547(10)
Subject Index 557


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