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Play and Child Development,9780131131231
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Play and Child Development

by ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131131231

ISBN10:
0131131230
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $79.66

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 1/1/2008.
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Summary

With significantly expanded discussions on key topics, here is a revised edition of the popular early childhood book that, more than any other book on the market, ties play directly to child development. Through a seamless blend of research, theory, and practical applications, its comprehensive coverage addresses the full spectrum of play-related topics.The book analyzes play theories and play therapy; presents a history of play; and discusses current play trends. It explores ways to create safe play environments for all children, and how to weave play into school curricula. Finally, the authors examine the role of adults in leading and encouraging children's natural tendencies toward learning by playing. Special coverage includes a full chapter on play and children with disabilities, and the value of field trips in supporting learning.For pre-service and in-service, pre-school and primary grade teachers.

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1 Play's History: Ideas, Beliefs, and Activities 2(24)
Philosophy and Ideas over the Years
6(17)
The Ancients and Play
6(1)
Enlightenment and Romantic Thought on Play
7(6)
On the Nature of Play: Scientific Approaches
13(3)
The Modern Era of Children's Play
16(7)
Emerging Issues
23(1)
Summary
23(1)
Key Terms
24(1)
Study Questions
24(2)
CHAPTER 2 Theory as Lenses on Children's Play 26(30)
Why Study Theories?
28(1)
Current Theories of Play
29(2)
Dominant Contemporary Theories
31(16)
Psychoanalysis: Emotional Motives for Play
31(3)
Communications and Play
34(3)
Cognitive Views
37(5)
Social Play
42(4)
Creativity in Play
46(1)
Emerging Theories of Play
47(1)
Play through Different Lenses
48(1)
Beliefs and Philosophy
48(5)
A Model of Classroom Play
49(4)
Issues Shaping Play Theory
53(1)
The Need for Theory About Unique Contexts
54(1)
Interdisciplinarity
54(1)
Teachers' Thinking About Play
54(1)
Summary
54(1)
Key Terms
55(1)
Study Questions
55(1)
CHAPTER 3 Neuroscience, Play Deprivation, and Pay-for-Play 56(30)
Neuroscience, Play, and Child Development
58(7)
Emergence of Neuroscience
59(1)
High-Tech Brain Imaging
60(1)
Organization of the Brain
60(1)
Effects of Deprivation on Brain Development
61(1)
Neuroscience and Play Connections
62(1)
Neuroscience and Cognitive Development
63(1)
Neuroscience and Language Development
63(1)
Neuroscience and Social Development
63(1)
Neuroscience and Emotional Development
64(1)
Neuroscience and Physical Development
64(1)
Neuroscience and Educational Practice: Bridging the Gap
65(1)
Brain Research and Child Development
66(2)
Effects of Play Deprivation on Child Development
68(2)
Alternatives to Traditional Spontaneous Play
70(3)
Play and Organized Sports
71(1)
Play and Leisure
71(1)
Play and Entertainment
72(1)
Play and Work
72(1)
Impediments to Spontaneous Play
73(2)
Pay-for-Play and Technology
75(7)
Electronic Play
76(5)
Immersive Reality and Theme Parks
81(1)
Children's Museums
82(1)
Summary
83(1)
Key Terms
84(1)
Study Questions
84(2)
CHAPTER 4 Play: Infants and Toddlers 86(34)
Physical and Motor Development
88(4)
Characteristics of Physical Development
88(1)
Characteristics of Motor Development
88(1)
Variations in Physical and Motor Development
89(1)
Play and Motor Development
90(1)
Exploration or Play?
90(2)
Adult Roles in Motor Play
92(1)
Cognitive Development
92(4)
Characteristics of Cognitive Development
92(1)
Variations in Cognitive Development
93(2)
Play and Cognitive Development
95(1)
Adult Roles in Cognitive Play
96(1)
Cultural Differences in Parent-Child Pretend Play
96(1)
Language Development
96(7)
Characteristics of Language Development
96(4)
Variations in Language Development
100(1)
The Role of Adults in Language Development
101(1)
Play and Language Development
101(1)
Adult Roles in Language Play
102(1)
Beginning Steps in Literacy Development
103(1)
Social Development
103(4)
Characteristics of Social Development
103(1)
Variations in Social and Emotional Development
104(1)
The Role of Adults in Social and Emotional Development
105(1)
Play and Social Development
105(2)
Peer Play
107(1)
Adult and Sibling Roles in Social Play
107(1)
Characteristics of Infant and Toddler Play
107(7)
Motor Play
108(1)
Object Play
108(1)
Social Play
109(1)
Symbolic Play
109(1)
Gender Differences in Play
110(1)
Creativity and Play
110(1)
The Integrated Nature of Play
111(3)
Adult Roles in Infant and Toddler Play
114(1)
Toys and Materials for Infant and Toddler Play
115(3)
Summary
118(1)
Key Terms
119(1)
Study Questions
119(1)
CHAPTER 5 Play in the Preschool Years 120(36)
Physical Development
122(4)
Characteristics of Motor Development
123(1)
Play and Physical Development
123(2)
Adult Roles in Physical Play
125(1)
Cognitive Development
126(5)
Characteristics of Cognitive Development
126(1)
Play and Cognitive Development
127(2)
Characteristics of Cognitive Play
129(1)
Adult Roles in Cognitive Play
129(2)
Language and Literacy Development
131(3)
Characteristics of Language Development
131(1)
Characteristics of Literacy Development
131(1)
Variations in Language and Literacy Development
132(1)
Play and Language and Literacy Development
132(2)
Adult Roles in Language and Literacy Play
134(1)
Social Development
134(9)
Characteristics of Social-Emotional Development
134(2)
Play and Social-Emotional Development
136(1)
Characteristics of Social Play
137(4)
Variations in Social Competence and Play
141(1)
Variations in Sociodramatic Play
142(1)
Adult Roles in Social Play
142(1)
Characteristics of Preschool Play
143(8)
The Integrated Nature of Play
143(1)
Variations in Development and Play
143(4)
Creativity and Play
147(4)
Adult Roles in Preschool Play
151(1)
Toys and Materials for Preschool Play
152(2)
Summary
154(1)
Key Terms
154(1)
Study Questions
155(1)
CHAPTER 6 Play and the School-Age Child 156(32)
Physical Development
158(5)
Characteristics of Motor Development
158(1)
Play and Physical Development
159(3)
Adult Roles in Physical Play
162(1)
Cognitive Development
163(4)
Characteristics of Cognitive Development
164(1)
Variations in Cognitive Development
165(1)
Play and Cognitive Development
165(1)
Characteristics of Cognitive Play
165(2)
Language and Literacy Development
167(3)
Characteristics of Language Development
167(1)
Characteristics of Literacy Development
168(1)
Language and Literacy Development and Play
168(1)
Adult Roles in Language and Literacy Play
169(1)
Social and Emotional Development
170(7)
Characteristics of Social and Emotional Development
171(1)
Play and Social-Emotional Development
172(1)
Characteristics of Social Play
173(1)
Variations in Social Competence and Play
173(2)
From Sociodramatic Play to Structured Dramatics
175(1)
Adult Roles in Social and Sociodramatic Play
176(1)
Characteristics of School-Age Play
177(5)
The Integrated Nature of Play
177(1)
Gender Differences in Play
177(1)
Rough-and-Tumble Play
178(1)
Chase Games
179(1)
War Toys
179(2)
Creativity and Play
181(1)
Adult Roles in School-Age Play
182(2)
Toys and Materials for School-Age Play
184(1)
Summary
185(1)
Key Terms
186(1)
Study Questions
186(2)
CHAPTER 7 Culture and Gender in Play 188(24)
The Roots of Cultural Play Research
191(9)
The Work of Helen Schwartzman
192(4)
The Work of Slaughter and Dombrowski
196(3)
Context: Expanding on Developmental Views
199(1)
Cultural Influences on Children's Play
200(9)
Family Influences on Play
200(3)
Differences in Group Play
203(3)
Gender and Play
206(3)
Summary
209(1)
Key Terms
210(1)
Study Questions
210(2)
CHAPTER 8 Play and the Curriculum 212(34)
Common Elements of Play-Based Curricula
214(4)
Indoor Play Space: Centers and Their Arrangement
214(4)
Safety
218(1)
Schedule of the Day
218(1)
Variations in Approaches to Play
218(6)
Approach 1: Nonplag Curriculum Models
224(2)
Behaviorist Models
224(1)
Didactic Elementary School Programs
225(1)
Approach 2: The "Hands-Off" Play Curriculum
226(1)
Approach 3: Narrowly Focused Play Interventions
226(10)
Smilansky's Sociodramatic Play Intervention
227(2)
Isenberg and Jalongo's Creative Drama for the Primary Grades
229(3)
Roskos and Neuman's Literacy Play Model
232(1)
Kamii and DeVries's Group Games
233(3)
Approach 4: Broadly Focused Developmental Models
236(7)
The Bank Street Approach
236(1)
High/Scope
237(2)
Vygotskian Play Models
239(2)
Reggio Emilia Programs
241(2)
Borrowing the Best From Each Approach
243(1)
Key Terms
244(1)
Study Questions
244(2)
CHAPTER 9 Play and Children with Disabilities 246(30)
The Nature of Disabilities
248(3)
Physical Disabilities
248(1)
At-Risk Children
249(1)
Developmental Delays
250(1)
Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
250(1)
Children with Multiple Disabilities
251(1)
Children with Exceptional Abilities
251(1)
Disabilities and Play
251(10)
Children with Visual Impairments
252(1)
Children with Hearing Impairments
253(1)
Children with Motor Impairments
254(1)
Children at Risk for Developmental Delay or a Disability
255(2)
Children with Cognitive Delay and Mental Retardation
257(1)
Children with Language Delay and Communication Disorders
258(1)
Children with Autism
259(1)
Abused and Neglected Children
260(1)
The Role of the Environment
261(7)
Influences of Inclusion Classrooms on Children's Play
262(1)
Adapted Play Environments
263(5)
The Role of Technology
268(3)
Assistive Technology
268(2)
Adapted Toys
270(1)
Interactive Video
270(1)
Computer Technology
271(1)
Creativity and Play
271(1)
Play-Based Assessment
272(2)
Why Play-Based Assessment Is Being Used
272(1)
How Play-Based Assessments Are Conducted
273(1)
Research and Play-Based Assessment
273(1)
Summary
274(1)
Key Terms
275(1)
Study Questions
275(1)
CHAPTER 10 Introduction to Play Therapy 276(24)
History and Theories of Play Therapy
279(6)
Psychoanalysis: Roots of Play Therapy
279(1)
Psychoanalytic Play Therapy
280(2)
Structured Play Therapy
282(1)
Nondirective Therapy
283(1)
Relationship and Child-Centered Play Therapy
284(1)
Conducting Play Therapy
285(4)
Setting Up the Playroom
285(1)
Beginning Play Therapy
286(1)
Establishing Rapport
286(1)
Structuring the Playroom Experience
287(1)
The Playroom Relationship
287(1)
Establishing Limits
288(1)
Progress in Play Therapy
289(1)
Settings and Applications
289(7)
Group Play Therapy
289(2)
Interdisciplinary Teams
291(1)
Filial Therapy
291(1)
Hospital Play Therapy
292(3)
Preschools and Elementary Schools
295(1)
Links to Creativity
295(1)
Results of Play Therapy
296(2)
Summary
298(1)
Key Terms
298(1)
Study Questions
298(2)
CHAPTER 11 Creating Play Environments 300(30)
Then and Now
302(2)
History of Playgrounds in America
304(2)
Indoors versus Outdoors
306(1)
Playgrounds and Child Development
307(3)
Infant and Toddler Indoor and Outdoor Play Environments
308(1)
Preschool Play Environments
308(2)
School-Age Play Environments
310(1)
Creating Play Environments
310(9)
Space
312(1)
Selecting Play Equipment
313(5)
Recent and Continuing Research
318(1)
Creating Special Play Places: Nature and Magical Qualities
319(9)
Children's Gardens
320(5)
Making Play Environments Magical
325(3)
Summary
328(1)
Key Terms
328(1)
Study Questions
328(2)
CHAPTER 12 Child Safety in Public Places 330(32)
Hazards in Public Places
334(1)
Child Development and Safety
334(3)
Toddlers
336(1)
Preschoolers and Early-School-Age Children
337(1)
Guidelines/Standards for Safety
337(3)
History of Playground Equipment Standards
338(2)
Promoting Safety Where Children Play
340(16)
Playground Safety
343(1)
Amusement Parks
344(2)
Water Safety
346(2)
Noise
348(1)
Toy Safety
349(2)
Other Hazards
351(2)
Field Trips and Safety: Zoos
353(3)
Child Injuries and Litigation
356(3)
Summary
359(1)
Key Terms
360(1)
Study Questions
360(2)
CHAPTER 13 Play Leadership in American and European Playgrounds 362(21)
History of Play Leadership in America
365(2)
Play Leadership in Public Parks
365(1)
Play Leadership in Preschools
365(1)
Play Leadership in Public and Private Elementary Schools
366(1)
Theoretical Bases for Adult Intervention in Children's Play
367(4)
Piaget and Constructivism
369(1)
Vygotsky and Social Constructivism
370(1)
Chaos Theory
370(1)
Research Bases for Adult Intervention in Children's Play
371(2)
Practicing Play Leadership
373(4)
Pacific Oaks College Perspectives on Practice
373(1)
Vygotskian Perspectives on Practice
373(1)
Adventure Play and Play Leadership in Europe
374(3)
Conclusions and Recommendations
377(4)
Key Terms
381(1)
Study Questions
382
APPENDIX
Playground Checklist 383(5)
References 388(45)
Name Index 433(10)
Subject Index 443

Excerpts

NEW TO THIS EDITION This book is about children's play and development. Changes to this new edition include new information and research on the following: History, theories, and culture of play Montessori and child development views of play Examples of play in Chapters 1 and 2 Nature and consequences of play deprivation Benefits of playground play, more on safety in both indoor and outdoor play, and additional emphasis on nature, gardens, and wild places in children's play Effects of electronic play (video games, computers, immersive reality) on children's development Roles of play leaders Strategies for adults for facilitating play with children with disabilities Bullying and aggressive behavior in school-age children and characteristics of these children CONTENTS AND ORGANIZATION OF THIS TEXT To understand any human activity, such as play, it is necessary to explore that activity as it has evolved over time. We begin in Chapter 1 with a look at "Play's History: Ideas, Beliefs, and Activities." Indeed, play does have an epic history, dating back thousands of years. As we state in Chapter 1, play activities existed long before recorded history. As a result, we have both prerational knowledge of play, which has remained with us since before the onset of recorded history, and rational knowledge of play, those aspects of play that we have come to be aware of by means of scholarship. Our earliest rational knowledge of Western play can be described in terms of three themes:agon, mimesis,andchaos.These themes continue to describe play across the centuries, although the relative weight of each is seen to vary over time.Agon,or conflict, appears in competitive games and-has its present manifestation in sport.Mimesis,or imitative action, is associated with theater, role play, and creative forms of play.Chaos,or leaving things to the Fates, is reflected in games of chance. During the Enlightenment and Romance periods of history, versions ofmimesiswere exalted, to call attention to humankind's creative spirit. It was during these times that particular attention from scholars began to focus on children's play. Freedom and the human spirit were associated with play by educators such as Johan Pestalozzi and Friedrich Froebel. This belief has remained with us and forms a cornerstone for understanding children's play. The history of children's play developed a life of its own during the 19th century, with the scholarly research efforts of individuals such as G. Stanley Hall, John Dewey, and child development researchers who soon followed them. Although these scholars reflected differing assumptions about play, their combined efforts, building on the work of earlier philosophers, kept play at the center of children's development. Our history of prerational and rational experience with children's play serves as a basis for our current efforts to study play. Through the past century, research on children's play contributed to theories about play and its role in development. As we look at our efforts to make sense of play, we see a variety of rhetorics for play and a wider variety of theories to make sense of it. Chapter 2 introduces a number of theories that dominated play scholarship throughout the 20th century, as well as a number of emerging theories that are leading us into the 21st century. These theories are illustrated with an example of children at play, showing how play must be understood from multiple perspectives. Being able to put on different theoretical lenses allows the observer of play to understand its many meanings. Chapter 2 also provides a model for deciding which theory may be most useful for professionals who are supporting play. Theory is placed in the model as a tool for assisting teachers to plan, observe, and assess children as they play. Values and b


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