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Power and Interdependence,9780321048578
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Power and Interdependence

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780321048578

ISBN10:
0321048571
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $113.40
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    Power and Interdependence




Summary

This landmark book, an original work by two of the most renowned scholars in the field, continues to offer a rich theoretical approach to understanding contemporary world politics and valid general prescriptions for policy.Power and Interdependencewas written to construct a way of looking at the world of politics that helps us understand the relationships between economics and politics, and patterns of institutionalized international cooperation, while retaining key realist insights about the roles that power and interests play in world politics. The new Third Edition has been thoroughly updated to include analyses of the effects of new technologies and growing globalism on power and interdependence in today's world.For those interested in international relations and politics.

Table of Contents

Preface to First Edition viii
Preface to Second Edition xi
Preface to Third Edition xv
Part I Understanding Interdependence 1(52)
Interdependence in World Politics
3(17)
The New Rhetoric of Interdependence
5(2)
Interdependence as an Analytic Concept
7(2)
Power and Interdependence
9(8)
International Regime Change
17(3)
Realism and Complex Interdependence
20(13)
The Characteristics of Complex Interdependence
21(4)
Multiple Channels
22(1)
Absence of Hierarchy among Issues
22(1)
Minor Role of Military Force
23(2)
The Political Processes of Complex Interdependence
25(8)
Linkage Strategies
26(1)
Agenda Setting
27(2)
Transitional and Transgovernmental Relations
29(1)
Role of International Organizations
30(3)
Explaining International Regime Change
33(20)
An Economic Process Explanation
33(3)
Overall Power Structure Explanation
36(7)
Eroding Hegemony
36(4)
Limitations of an Overall Structure Explanation
40(3)
Issue Structure
43(4)
Limitations of Structural Explanations
45(2)
An International Organization Model
47(3)
Combining Explanations
50(3)
Part II Regime Change in Oceans and Money 53(90)
The Politics of Oceans and Money: Historical Overview
55(31)
The International Monetary Issue Area
57(18)
The International Gold Standard before 1914
58(5)
International Monetary Regimes, 1920-76
63(12)
The Oceans Issue Area
75(10)
Defining the Issue Area
76(2)
The Classical Free Seas Regime
78(2)
Regime Periods, 1920-75
80(3)
The Changing Agenda of Oceans Politics
83(2)
Conclusion
85(1)
Complex Interdependence in Oceans and Money
86(26)
The Conditions of Complex Interdependence
86(11)
Role of Force
86(5)
Absence of Hierarchy among Issues
91(4)
Multiple Channels of Contract
95(2)
Money, Oceans, and Complex Interdependence
97(1)
The Political Process in Money and Oceans
97(12)
Goals of Actors
99(4)
Instruments of State Policy
103(1)
Agenda Formation
104(2)
Linkage of Issues
106(1)
Roles of International Organizations
107(2)
Conclusion
109(3)
The Politics of Rule-Making in Oceans and Money
112(31)
Economic Processes and Regime Change
112(2)
Overall Structure and Regime Change
114(6)
Erosion of the Oceans Regime
115(2)
International Monetary Regimes
117(3)
Issue Structure and Regime Change
120(6)
International Monetary Issue Area
121(3)
Oceans Politics
124(2)
International Organization and Regime Change
126(6)
Oceans Politics
128(3)
The International Monetary Area
131(1)
Limits of Systemic Explanations: Domestic Politics and Leadership
132(5)
Conclusion
137(6)
Part III Regimes and Two Bilateral Relationships 143(48)
United States Relations with Canada and Australia
145(46)
Canadian-American Relations and Complex Interdependence
146(5)
Australian-American Relations and Complex Interdependence
151(5)
Identifying Issues and Outcomes: Canada-United States
156(13)
Identifying Issues and Outcomes: Australia-United States
169(5)
Comparing the Politics of Agenda Formation
174(2)
Accounting for Differences in Outcomes
176(6)
Regime Change: Alternative Explanations
182(9)
Part IV The United States and Complex Interdependence 191(22)
Coping with Interdependence
193(20)
Explanatory Models and Conditions of World Politics
193(3)
Power in Complex Interdependence
196(1)
Trends Toward Complex Interdependence
197(3)
Leadership in Complex Interdependence
200(2)
Multiple Leadership and Policy Coordination
202(2)
Building the Legitimacy of International Regimes
204(1)
International and Domestic Organization
205(6)
Conclusion
211(2)
Part V Globalism and the Information Age 213(52)
Power, Interdependence, and the Information Age
215(13)
The Information Revolution and Complex Interdependence
217(3)
Information and Power
220(3)
The Paradox of Plenty and the Politics of Credibility
223(5)
Power, Interdependence, and Globalism
228(37)
Globalization and Interdependence
229(11)
The Dimensions of Globalism
230(3)
Thick Globalism: Made in America?
233(2)
Connectivity, Sensitivity, Vulnerability
235(3)
Illustrating Interdependence and Globalism
238(2)
Contemporary Globalism: What's New?
240(9)
Density of Networks
240(3)
Reduced Communications Costs and Institutional Velocity
243(2)
Transnational Participation and Complex Interdependence
245(2)
Is Distance Becoming Irrelevant?
247(2)
Globalization and the End of the Cold War
249(3)
The End of the Cold War and the Dimensions of Globalism
249(2)
Conjunctural Politics and the Americanization of Globalism
251(1)
Politics, Equity, Power, and Governance
252(13)
Globalism and Domestic Politics
252(2)
Equity and the Political Effects of Increasing Inequality
254(3)
Power and Networks
257(1)
Governance of Globalism
258(7)
Part VI Second Thoughts on Theory and Policy (1989) 265(2)
Afterword 267(21)
1. Principal Themes of Power and Interdependence
267(5)
2. The Research Program of Power and Interdependence: A Critique
272(9)
Interdependence and Bargaining
273(2)
Complex Interdependence
275(3)
International Regime Change
278(3)
3. Limitations of Structural Theory: Systemic Political Processes
281(3)
4. Perceptions and Learning
284(3)
Conclusion
287(1)
Two Cheers for Multilateralism 288(13)
The Need for Regimes
290(2)
Unrealistic Visions
292(6)
Do Not Try to Recapture the Past
292(1)
Ask Whether the World Really Needs It
293(1)
Build on Shared Interests
294(1)
Use Regimes to Insure against Catastrophe
295(1)
The Best Enforcement Is Self-Enforcement
295(1)
Look for the Right Moment
296(1)
Use Regimes to Focus U.S. Attention on the Future
297(1)
Regime Maintenance
298(3)
United Nations Peacekeeping
299(1)
International Debt
299(1)
Exchange Rates
299(2)
Notes 301(25)
Index 326


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