CART

(0) items

The Practice Of Macro Social Work,9780534575854

The Practice Of Macro Social Work

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780534575854

ISBN10:
0534575854
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/29/2005
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning
List Price: $232.33

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$22.05

Hurry!

Only one copy
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780534575854
$22.05

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $2.48
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 8/29/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • The Practice of Macro Social Work
    The Practice of Macro Social Work
  • The Practice of Macro Social Work
    The Practice of Macro Social Work
  • The Practice Of Macro Social Work
    The Practice Of Macro Social Work




Summary

This comprehensive text explores the theory and methods in nine arenas of macro social work at the community, organizational, societal, and global levels of practice. Intended for undergraduate and graduate social work students who want to make a difference in today's modern society, this text challenges readers to use their concern, their values and their critical thinking skills to assist those who have been left out and kept out of making decisions that affect their lives, empowering them to reclaim a wholesome, healthy social environment for themselves and their children. The book's generalist orientation provides an organizational framework as well as generous amounts of history, biographical material on leading macro social workers, illustrative contemporary examples, and factual data that offers real life detail for students. Most important, however, is the depth and wealth of practical information that assists students in understanding how to help people engage in solving social problems and making social change to bring about a more just society and humane global civilization.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
Overview of the Practice of Macro Social Work
1(18)
Death Comes to Francisco
2(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
3(1)
The Place of Macro Practice in the Field of Social Work
3(1)
People's Social Welfare
3(1)
Social Work Services
3(1)
Undergraduate and Graduate Social Work
4(1)
A Brief History of Macro Social Work
4(3)
Progressive Era (1885-1915)
4(1)
Methodological Separation and Division (1915-1955)
5(1)
Professionalization and Specialization (1955-1970)
6(1)
Generalist and Specialist Social Work (1970-1990s)
7(1)
Expansion and Integration (1990s to the Present)
7(1)
What Is the Practice of Macro Social Work?
7(6)
Help Individuals and Groups
7(2)
Solve Social Problems and Make Social Change
9(1)
The Spectrum of Macro Social Work
10(3)
Resources
13(1)
A Challenge to You
13(1)
Conclusion
14(1)
Key Concepts
14(1)
Questions for Discussion
14(1)
Additional Reading
15(4)
PART I Solving Social Problems and Making Social Change
19(92)
Social Problems: The Challenge of Macro Social Work
23(33)
Our Modern Society
24(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
25(1)
Defining Social Problems
25(4)
Conventional Definitions
26(1)
A Social Work Definition of Social Problems
27(2)
Ethnic Intolerance: A Brief History of a Social Problem
29(6)
Early Beginnings
29(1)
Eastern, Midwestern, and Southern Native Americans
30(1)
French, Irish, and German Americans
31(1)
Mexican Americans
31(1)
African Americans
32(1)
Western Native Americans
33(1)
Chinese Americans
33(1)
Japanese Americans
34(1)
Other Ethnic Groups
34(1)
Assumptions About Social Problems
35(11)
Organizational Deviance Model
35(3)
Intergroup Conflict Model
38(1)
Institutional Deviance Model
39(1)
Systems Deviance Model
40(3)
Social Cultural Premises Model
43(1)
Globalization: The Developmental Model
44(2)
Four Approaches to Solving Social Problems
46(5)
Reactive Approach
46(1)
Inactive Approach
47(1)
Proactive Approach
48(1)
Interactive Approach
49(2)
Answers That Won't Work
51(2)
Social Denial
51(1)
Avoidance
51(1)
Blaming
52(1)
Moralizing
53(1)
The Quick Fix
53(1)
Conclusion
53(1)
Key Concepts
53(1)
Questions for Discussion
54(1)
Additional Reading
54(2)
Rational Problem Solving and Social Thinking
56(22)
Thomas Hobbes and Modern Reason
58(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
58(1)
What Is Modern Rational Problem Solving?
59(1)
Maximize One's Interests
59(1)
Practical
59(1)
Unitary Decision Maker
59(1)
Reason at Large
59(1)
Rational Problem Solving and Social Work
60(1)
A Brief History of RPS in Social Work
60(1)
Prior to 1850
60(1)
Reconstruction (1865-1880)
60(1)
Progressive Era (1880-1915)
60(1)
1930s and 1940s
61(1)
Social Work Problem Solving in the 1950s and 1960s
61(1)
Rational Problem Solving Today
61(1)
How to Use Rational Problem Solving
61(7)
Decide on a Goal or Target
61(2)
Gather Information About the Problem
63(2)
Generate Alternative Solutions
65(1)
Assess and Compare Alternatives
65(1)
Choose the Best Solution
66(1)
Develop a Plan of Action
67(1)
Implement the Solution
67(1)
Evaluate the Results
68(1)
Limitations of Rational Problem Solving
68(1)
Values
68(1)
Unidimensional
69(1)
Components of Social Thinking
69(3)
Change Oriented
69(1)
Citizenship Approach
69(1)
Civic Consciousness
69(1)
Collective Effort
70(1)
Interdependent
70(1)
Borderless and Nonmanaged
70(1)
Direct and Immediate
70(1)
Empowering
70(1)
Rooted in Practice
71(1)
Multiple Ways of Knowing
71(1)
A Brief History of Social Thinking
72(2)
Classical Greeks
72(1)
Pragmatism and Social Psychology
72(1)
Murray Ross and Community Organization
72(1)
Symbolic Interactionists
72(1)
Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed
73(1)
Liberation Theology
73(1)
How to Engage the Social Thinking Process
74(2)
Sensing/Experiencing: Cognitive Dissonance
74(1)
Shared Interaction: Feelings and Values
74(1)
Intuitive Reflection
75(1)
Cognitive Thinking: Developing a Strategy
75(1)
Moving to Action: Thinking as Doing
76(1)
Conclusion
76(1)
Key Concepts
76(1)
Questions for Discussion
77(1)
Additional Reading
77(1)
Leadership: The Hallmark of Macro Social Work
78(33)
Jane Addams (1860-1935), Social Leader
79(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
80(1)
Social and Task Group Leadership
81(3)
Social Leadership
81(2)
Task Group Leadership
83(1)
A Brief History of Social and Task Group Leadership
84(9)
Social Leadership: The Early Years
84(2)
Leadership in the 1920s
86(1)
Social and Task Group Leadership in the 1930s
86(1)
The 1940s and 1950s: Professionalizing Social Leadership
87(1)
Task Group Leadership From 1945 to 1960
88(1)
Social and Task Group Leadership in the 1960s
88(4)
Social Leadership From 1970 to the Present
92(1)
How to Help People Become Social Leaders
93(5)
Feeling to Build Community
93(2)
Thinking to Develop Strength
95(1)
Intuition to Envision
96(1)
Sensing to Move to Action
96(2)
Closing the Circle
98(1)
How to Help a Task Group Accomplish Its Purpose
98(10)
Pregroup Planning
98(1)
Leading the First Meeting
99(3)
Leading the Group Through Its Life Cycle
102(6)
Ending the Group
108(1)
Conclusion
108(1)
Key Concepts
108(1)
Questions for Discussion
109(1)
Additional Reading
110(1)
PART II Social Work Practice With Communities
111(132)
Community
114(22)
The Miracle of Le Chambon
115(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
116(1)
What Is Community?
116(7)
Community as a Locality
117(1)
Relational Community
118(5)
A Brief History of Community and Its Theorists
123(8)
Early Communal Society
123(1)
The Enlightenment (1400-1700)
123(1)
Community in Early America (1600-1800)
124(1)
The Industrial Revolution (1800-1920)
125(1)
Community Sociology (1887-1920)
125(3)
Urbanization (1920-1990)
128(1)
Community Theorists (1990-2000)
129(2)
Macro Social Work and the Community
131(1)
Community Planning Approach
131(1)
Community Development Approach
131(1)
Community Organization Approach
131(1)
The Consensual Approach
132(1)
Conclusion
132(1)
Key Concepts
133(1)
Questions for Discussion
133(1)
Additional Reading
133(3)
The Practice of Community Planning
136(33)
Community Planning, Alive and Kicking
137(2)
Planning Process
138(1)
Methods
138(1)
Participation
138(1)
Goals
139(1)
Implementation
139(1)
Leadership
139(1)
Official Status
139(1)
Political Power
139(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
139(1)
Why Plan?
140(1)
What Is Social Work Planning?
140(2)
Social Welfare Planning
140(1)
Social Agency Planning
141(1)
Neighborhood Planning
141(1)
A Brief History of Social Planning in America
142(9)
Founding the Nation
143(1)
Progressives and Social Work Planning
143(1)
Planning the Welfare State
143(1)
Housing and Urban Planning
144(2)
Planning for Mental Health
146(1)
Planning for Older Americans
147(1)
Community Planning
147(4)
The Future of Social Welfare Planning
151(1)
Foundations of Community Planning
151(2)
Empowerment Oriented
151(1)
Future Directed
152(1)
Democratically Aimed
152(1)
Advocacy Based
152(1)
Practically Engaged
152(1)
How to Practice Community Planning
153(13)
Build a Network of Relationships
153(1)
Develop a Planning Board
153(1)
Define the Problem
154(1)
Mobilize Guiding Values
154(1)
Perform Assessments
154(1)
Perform Research
155(5)
Develop Alternative Solutions
160(2)
Assess and Compare Alternatives
162(1)
Provide Feedback
163(1)
Present the Solution to the Community
163(2)
Present the Solution to Decision Makers
165(1)
Implement the Solution
166(1)
Monitor and Evaluate
166(1)
Conclusion
166(1)
Key Concepts
167(1)
Questions for Discussion
167(1)
Additional Reading
168(1)
The Practice of Community Development
169(31)
Community Development Finds Itself
170(2)
Cooperation
171(1)
Leadership Development
171(1)
Innovation
172(1)
Consensual Community Organizing
172(1)
Results
172(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
172(1)
What Is Community Development?
173(2)
Individual Growth and Skill Enhancement
173(1)
The Importance of Task Groups
173(1)
Constructing a Community Development Corporation
174(1)
What Is a Community Development Corporation?
175(4)
Citizen Participation
175(1)
Community Based
175(1)
Alternatives to Private Business
175(1)
Size and Scope
175(1)
Programs
176(2)
Funding
178(1)
Statewide, Regional, National, and International Organizations
179(1)
Statewide Organizations
179(1)
Regional Organizations
179(1)
National Organizations
180(1)
International Organizations
180(1)
A Brief History of Community Development
180(8)
Utopian Community Development
180(1)
Modern Community Development in North America
181(7)
How to Build a Community Development Corporation
188(6)
Community Identification
188(1)
Willingness and Motivation
188(1)
Focused Interviews and Focus Groups
188(1)
Develop an Action Group
189(1)
Use a Resources and Assets Approach
189(1)
Develop a Resources and Assets Inventory
190(1)
Develop the Corporation
191(1)
Decide on a Set of Actions
192(1)
Develop a Project
192(1)
Develop Relationships With Corporations, Government, and Intermediaries
193(1)
End the Process
193(1)
E-Community Development
194(2)
Chittenden Community Television
194(1)
Playing to Win
195(1)
Institute for the Study of Civic Values
195(1)
Government Cooperation
195(1)
Community Technology Centers
195(1)
Using the Internet
195(1)
Conclusion
196(1)
Key Concepts
196(1)
Questions for Discussion
197(1)
Additional Reading
197(3)
The Practice of Community Organization
200(43)
When You Have Trouble in San Antonio, Call the COPS
202(2)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
204(1)
What Is Community Organizing?
204(4)
Individuals and Whole-Mind Thinking
204(2)
Facilitate Task Groups
206(1)
Working With Communities
207(1)
Working With Society
207(1)
What Are Community Organizations?
208(2)
Scope and Size
208(1)
Change Efforts
208(2)
Community Organizing and Models of Social Deviance
210(2)
Organizational Deviance Model
210(1)
Intergroup Conflict Model of Social Deviance
211(1)
A Brief History of Community Organizing in America
212(9)
Labor Organizing
212(1)
The Progressive Era (1880-1915)
212(1)
School Community Centers (1900-1929)
213(1)
Saul Alinsky and Grassroots Community Organizing (1935-1940)
214(1)
Community Organizing in the 1940s
215(1)
Community Organizing in the 1950s
215(2)
The Turbulent 1960s
217(2)
Community Organizing in the 1970s
219(1)
Community Organizing in the 1980s
219(1)
Community Organizing in the 1990s
220(1)
The Impact of Community Organizing in the 2000s
221(1)
How to Practice Community Organizing
221(5)
Understand the People
221(2)
Overcome Self-Oppression
223(1)
Engage the Community
224(1)
Define the Problem
224(1)
Build an Organization
224(1)
The Role of the Staff Organizer
225(1)
Carry Out Strategies
226(1)
Debrief
226(1)
Termination
226(1)
How to Use Four Models of Community Organizing
226(8)
Chavez Organizational Linking Model
227(1)
Ross House Meeting Model
228(2)
Alinsky Coalition Model
230(2)
Social Networks Model
232(2)
Community Organizing for the 21st Century: Consensus Organizing
234(3)
Triple-Pronged Approach
234(1)
Four-Pronged Approach
234(1)
How to Do Consensus Building Community Organizing
234(2)
Strengths and Limitations of Consensus Organizing
236(1)
Conclusion
237(1)
Key Concepts
237(1)
Questions for Discussion
238(1)
Additional Reading
238(5)
PART III The Practice of Social Work With Organizations
243(126)
Social Organizations
245(29)
The Success of Social Organizations
246(2)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
248(1)
Social Organizations
248(7)
No Commonly Accepted Name
248(1)
New Components
249(2)
New Structure
251(1)
New Social Purpose
252(1)
New Means of Funding
253(2)
New Configuration of Public Power
255(1)
A Brief History of Social Organizations
255(1)
The 1800s
255(1)
Civil War and Reconstruction
255(1)
New Deal and World War II
256(1)
Growth From 1950 to 2000
256(1)
Modern Complex Organizations
256(2)
Ubiquitous
256(1)
Wealthy
257(1)
Size and Stability
258(1)
Concentrated
258(1)
Technologically Innovative
258(1)
A Definition of Modern Complex Organizations
258(2)
Artificial
258(1)
Intentionally Contrived
259(1)
Functional Tools
259(1)
Accomplish Goals
259(1)
Directed by Their Owners
259(1)
A Brief History of Modern Complex Organizations
260(8)
The First Corporations (1600-1750)
260(1)
The Industrial Revolution and the Factory System (1750-1910)
260(1)
Frederick Taylor and Scientific Management (1910-1920)
261(1)
The Bureaucratic Machine Tool (1900-1930)
262(1)
The Human Relations School (1927-1940)
263(1)
Interregnum of World War II
263(1)
Herbert Simon and the Decision-Making School (1945-1960)
264(1)
The Contingency School (1970-1980)
265(1)
Transnational Organizations in the Global Society (1990s-Present)
266(2)
Macro Social Work and Perspectives of Change
268(1)
Social Work and the Structural Functional Perspective
268(1)
Social Work and the Organizational Deviance Perspective
269(1)
Conclusion
269(1)
Key Concepts
270(1)
Questions for Discussion
271(1)
Additional Reading
271(3)
The Practice of Social Work Program Development
274(37)
Clara Barton, Angel of the Battlefield
275(2)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
277(1)
Who Are Social Work Program Developers?
277(1)
A Brief History of Program Development
277(3)
Colonial Period and American Independence (1609-1800)
277(1)
Period of Institutional Programs (1800-1860)
278(1)
Civil War and Reconstruction (1860-1885)
279(1)
Progressive Era (1885-1910)
279(1)
Program Development Today
280(1)
How to Develop a Social Organization
280(8)
Form a Program Development Group
281(1)
Identify and Verify the Need
282(2)
Establish the Legal Corporation
284(4)
Working With the Board of Directors
288(4)
Recruit Board Members
288(1)
Train and Orient the Board
289(2)
The First Board Meeting
291(1)
Establish the Social Organization's Culture and Structure
292(2)
Mission Statement
292(1)
Vision Statement
292(1)
Values Statement
292(1)
Goal Statement
292(1)
The Organizational Structure
292(2)
Staff the Social Organization
294(4)
The Administrator
294(1)
Fair Employment Practices
294(1)
Positions, Salary, and Benefits
295(2)
Recruit and Select Candidates
297(1)
Finance the Social Organization
298(7)
The Budgeting Process
299(1)
Bookkeeping System
299(1)
Obtain Funding
300(5)
Recruit Clients
305(1)
Obtain Referrals
305(1)
Networking
305(1)
Sponsor an Open House
306(1)
Conclusion
306(1)
Key Concepts
306(1)
Questions for Discussion
307(1)
Additional Reading
307(4)
The Practice of Social Work Administration
311(27)
Harry Hopkins, Social Work Administrator
312(2)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
314(1)
Business Management and Social Administration
314(2)
Business Management
314(1)
Social Administration
315(1)
A Brief History of Administrative Law
316(2)
Equal Pay Act of 1963
316(1)
Civil Rights Act of 1964
316(1)
Age Discrimination Act of 1975
317(1)
O'Conner v. Ortega, 1987: Employee Privacy
317(1)
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990
318(1)
How to Practice Social Administration
318(11)
Supervision
318(2)
Administrative Decision Making
320(4)
Administering Finances
324(2)
Administering the Human Side of Social Organizations
326(3)
The Role of the Chief Administrative Social Worker
329(5)
Service
329(1)
Planning
329(1)
Relating to the Board of Directors
330(1)
Evaluating the Social Organization
330(4)
Conclusion
334(1)
Key Concepts
334(1)
Questions for Discussion
334(1)
Additional Reading
335(3)
The Practice of Organization Development
338(31)
Jean Carlyle Takes a Stand
339(2)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
341(1)
What Is Organization Development?
341(1)
Internal Organization Development
341(1)
External Organization Development
341(1)
Macro Social Work and Organization Development
342(1)
A Brief History of Organization Development
342(3)
The Origins of Organization Development: 1940s and 1950s
342(1)
Organization Development in the 1960s and 1970s
343(1)
Organization Development in the 1980s
344(1)
Organization Development: 1990s to the Present
344(1)
Conventional Organization Development
345(1)
Conventional Organization Development and Change
345(2)
Forces Impelling the Need for Change
345(1)
Barriers to Change
346(1)
Approaches to Conventional Organization Development
347(1)
Systems Approach
347(1)
Social Ecology Approach
347(1)
Levels of Analysis Approach
347(1)
Subsystems Approach
347(1)
Contingency Approach
348(1)
Therapeutic Approach
348(1)
How to Practice Conventional Organization Development
348(14)
Negotiate a Contract
348(1)
Identify the Problem
348(1)
Gather Information
349(1)
Diagnose and Treat the Problem
350(12)
Social Organization Development
362(1)
How to Practice Social Organization Development
363(4)
Engagement
363(1)
Develop a Contract
363(1)
Renegotiate Control and Responsibility
363(2)
Offer an Invitation to Change
365(1)
Create a Desired Future
365(1)
Form Improvement Teams
365(1)
Change Work Practices
366(1)
Redesign the Organization
366(1)
Offer Learning Opportunities
366(1)
Trust the Social Workers
366(1)
Conclusion
367(1)
Key Concepts
367(1)
Questions for Discussion
367(1)
Additional Reading
368(1)
PART IV Social Work Practice at the National and International Levels
369(126)
The Practice of Social Work Policy Advocacy
372(44)
Joan Claybrook: Social Policy Advocate
374(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
374(1)
What Are Social Policies?
375(1)
Federal Social Policies
375(1)
State and Local Social Policies
375(1)
Social Policy and Social Organizations
375(1)
A Brief History of Policy Making and Advocacy
375(12)
Individual Policy Activists of the 1800s
376(1)
The Progressive Era: 1885-1915
376(3)
Social Policies of the 1930s
379(1)
Social Policies of the 1940s and 1950s
380(2)
Social Policies of the 1960s
382(2)
Public Policies in the 1970s and 1980s
384(1)
Social Policies in the 1990s
385(1)
Social Policies in the First Decade of 2000
386(1)
Who Decides: Models of Policy Making
387(5)
Elite Model
387(1)
Institutional Model
388(1)
Interest Group Model
388(1)
Rational Model
389(1)
Administrative Model
390(1)
Bargaining and Negotiation
391(1)
Systems Model
391(1)
Garbage Can Model
392(1)
A Critique of Conventional Policy-Making Models
392(2)
Politics of Patriarchy
392(1)
Politics of Disengagement
392(1)
Politics of Powerlessness
393(1)
Politics of Exclusion
393(1)
Politics of Persuasion
394(1)
Politics of Inequality
394(1)
Normative Social Policy
394(4)
Substantive Politics
394(2)
Character Education
396(1)
Value Education
396(1)
Community Politics
397(1)
Grassroots Democracy
397(1)
Creating a Good Society
397(1)
Kinds of Policy Analysis
398(1)
Top-Down Policy Analysis
398(1)
Community-Centered Policy Analysis
398(1)
How to Do Community-Centered Policy Analysis
398(11)
Develop a Policy-Making Group
398(1)
Define the Problem
399(2)
Define the ``Real'' Problem
401(1)
Relabel the Problem
401(1)
Gather Information
401(2)
Develop Alternative Solutions
403(1)
Choose Among Alternative Solutions
404(2)
Decide on the Best Solution
406(1)
Develop a Policy Proposal
406(1)
Present the Proposal
406(1)
Gain Acceptance by the Sponsoring Organization
407(1)
Implement the Policy
407(2)
Social Policy and the Internet
409(2)
E-Democracy
409(1)
E-Government
410(1)
E-Journalism
410(1)
E-Advocacy
410(1)
Blending Approaches
411(1)
Conclusion
411(1)
Key Concepts
411(1)
Questions for Discussion
412(1)
Additional Reading
413(3)
The Practice of Social Work With Social Movements
416(40)
Martin Luther King Jr. and the War in Vietnam
417(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
418(1)
Modern Social Movements
419(1)
Postmodern Social Movements
419(1)
Modern Social Action
419(1)
Community Organization and Modern Social Movements
420(1)
Community Organization
420(1)
Social Movements
420(1)
Models of Social Change
420(1)
Organizational Deviance Model of Social Change
420(1)
Institutional Deviance Model of Social Change
421(1)
Systems Deviance Model of Social Change
421(1)
A Brief History of Modern Social Movements
421(14)
Labor Movement: 1636 to 2000
422(5)
Abolitionist Movement: 1830 to 1865
427(1)
Progressive Movement: 1885 to 1910
428(3)
Period of Quiescence: 1920 to 1955
431(1)
Period of Protest: 1955 to 1973
432(3)
How to Engage in Modern Social Action
435(11)
Unfreeze the System
435(8)
Move to Action
443(2)
Refreeze: Solidify Change
445(1)
Limitations of Modern Social Action
446(1)
Postmodern Social Movements
447(1)
Social Cultural Model of Social Change
447(1)
Women's Liberation Movement
447(1)
Peace Movement
448(1)
Environmental Movement
448(1)
Characteristics of Postmodern Social Movements
448(2)
New Structure
448(1)
Rejection of Individualism
449(1)
New Ways of Thinking
449(1)
Community Based
449(1)
Redefined Role of Government
450(1)
Transformation of Public Life
450(1)
Culture Building
450(1)
The Postmodern Social Movement Process
450(2)
Cognitive Dissonance
450(1)
Shared Perceptions and Meanings
451(1)
Envisioning a New Future
451(1)
Collective Identity and Submerged Networks
451(1)
Action
451(1)
Conclusion
452(1)
Key Concepts
452(1)
Questions for Discussion
453(1)
Additional Reading
453(3)
The Practice of Social Work at the Global Level
456(39)
Our Global Society in Perspective
457(1)
What You Will Learn in This Chapter
458(1)
What Is the Practice of Macro Social Work at the Global Level?
458(1)
A Brief History of International Social Work
459(7)
Origins of International Community Development and Relief: 1800-1899
459(1)
Social Work Education and Community Development: 1900-1945
459(1)
The Rise of the Global Market: 1945-1970
460(3)
Increasing Growth of the Global Economy: 1980s
463(1)
Increasing Influence of Nongovernmental Organizations: 1990s
464(1)
Domination of the Free Global Market: 2000s
465(1)
Brave New Millennium: Social Problems in Our Global Society
466(8)
Poverty
466(2)
Slavery
468(3)
Manufacturing Violence and International Conflict
471(1)
Refugees
472(1)
Destruction of the Global Ecosystem
473(1)
International Social Organizations
474(6)
Broad-Based Grassroots Organizations
474(2)
Single-Focus Grassroots Organizations
476(1)
Nongovernmental Organizations
476(1)
Nongovernmental Support Organizations
477(1)
Transnational Nongovernmental Organizations
478(1)
The United Nations
478(1)
International Social Work Organizations
479(1)
Arenas of International Social Work
480(7)
International Relief and Refugee Social Work
480(1)
Sustainable Human Development
481(1)
Community Economic Development
481(2)
International Social Activism: New Social Movements
483(4)
How to Practice International Social Work
487(2)
Find a Position
487(1)
Orient Yourself
487(1)
Engage People
487(1)
Develop Trust
488(1)
Develop Empowerment
488(1)
Encourage Decision Making
488(1)
Develop a Plan
488(1)
Provide Training
489(1)
Develop Leadership
489(1)
Evaluate
489(1)
Using the Internet in International Social Work
489(1)
International E-Activism and E-Services
489(1)
E-Empowerment
490(1)
E-Development
490(1)
Conclusion
490(1)
Key Concepts
491(1)
Questions for Discussion
492(1)
Additional Reading
492(3)
Epilogue Macro Social Work: A Profession of Heroes
495(12)
Irena Sendler: Social Work Rescuer
496(1)
Macro Social Workers and Heroes of Social Justice
497(8)
Conclusion
505(1)
Additional Reading
505(2)
Notes 507(24)
Name Index 531(4)
Subject Index 535


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...