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Principles of Language Learning and Teaching,9780131991286

Principles of Language Learning and Teaching

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780131991286

ISBN10:
0131991280
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
5/22/2006
Publisher(s):
Pearson Education ESL
List Price: $74.33

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Summary

Principles of Language Learning and Teaching, Fifth Edition, by H. Douglas Brown, is the classic second language acquisition text used by teacher education programs worldwide. Principles introduces key concepts through definitions of terms, thought-provoking questions, charts, and spiraling. New "Classroom Connections" encourage students to consider the implications of research for classroom pedagogy. An up-to-date bibliography and new glossary provide quick access to important works and key terminology in the field.

 

The fifth edition takes a comprehensive look at foundations of language teaching through discussions of the latest research in the field, including:

  • Vygotsky's and Bakhtin's theories
  • Thorndike's law of effect
  • error treatment, noticing, recasts
  • intercultural communication
  • language policy and politics
  • corpus linguistics
  • "hot topics" in SLA
  • connectionism and emergentism
  • flow theory, willingness to communicate
  • strategies-based instruction
  • contrastive rhetoric
  • attribution theory, self-efficacy
  • output hypothesis

Also by H. Douglas Brown:

Teaching by Principles: An Interactive Approach to Language Pedagogy

Language Assessment: Principles and Classroom Practices

Strategies for Success: A Practical Guide to Learning English

Author Biography

Dr. H. Douglas Brown, a professor in the MA-TESOL program at San Francisco State University, has written many articles, teacher training books, and textbooks on language pedagogy. A past president of TESOL and recipient of the James E. Alatis Award for Distinguished Service, Dr. Brown has lectured to English language teaching audiences around the world.

Table of Contents

Preface to the Fifth Edition xi
Language, Learning, and Teaching
1(23)
Questions about Second Language Acquisition
1(2)
Learner Characteristics
2(1)
Linguistic Factors
2(1)
Learning Processes
2(1)
Age and Acquisition
2(1)
Instructional Variables
3(1)
Context
3(1)
Purpose
3(1)
Rejoicing in Our Defeats
3(2)
Language
5(2)
Learning and Teaching
7(2)
Schools of Thought in Second Language Acquisition
9(6)
Structural Linguistics and Behavioral Psychology
9(2)
Generative Linguistics and Cognitive Psychology
11(1)
Constructivism: A Multidisciplinary Approach
12(3)
Nineteen Centuries of Language Teaching
15(2)
Language Teaching in the Twentieth Century
17(2)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
19(1)
Suggested Readings
20(1)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 1
21(3)
Guidelines for Entry 1
22(2)
PART I. AGE FACTORS
First Language Acquisition
24(30)
Theories of First Language Acquisition
25(10)
Behavioral Approaches
26(1)
Challenges to Behavioral Approaches
27(1)
The Nativist Approach
28(3)
Challenges to Nativist Approaches
31(2)
Functional Approaches
33(2)
Issues in First Language Acquisition
35(13)
Competence and Performance
35(3)
Comprehension and Production
38(1)
Nature or Nurture?
39(1)
Universals
40(2)
Systematicity and Variability
42(1)
Language and Thought
42(1)
Imitation
43(2)
Practice and Frequency
45(1)
Input
46(1)
Discourse
47(1)
First Language Acquisition Insights Applied to Language Teaching
48(3)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
51(1)
Suggested Readings
52(1)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 2
53(1)
Age and Acquisition
54(32)
Dispelling Myths
54(2)
Types of Comparison and Contrast
56(1)
The Critical Period Hypothesis
57(1)
Neurobiological Considerations
58(4)
Hemispheric Lateralization
58(1)
Biological Timetables
59(1)
Right-Hemispheric Participation
60(1)
Anthropological Evidence
61(1)
The Significance of Accent
62(3)
Cognitive Considerations
65(3)
Affective Considerations
68(3)
Linguistics Considerations
71(4)
Bilingualism
72(1)
Interference Between First and Second Languages
72(1)
Order of Acquisition
73(2)
Issues in First Language Acquisition Revisited
75(3)
Competence and Performance
75(1)
Comprehension and Production
75(1)
Nature or Nurture?
76(1)
Universals
76(1)
Systematicity and Variability
76(1)
Language and Thought
77(1)
Imitation
77(1)
Practice and Frequency
77(1)
Input
78(1)
Discourse
78(1)
Some ``Age-and-Acquisition-Inspired'' Language Teaching Methods
78(3)
Total Physical Response
78(1)
The Natural Approach
79(2)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
81(1)
Suggested Readings
82(1)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 3
83(3)
PART II. PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS
Human Learning
86(32)
Learning and Training
86(1)
Pavlov's Classical Behaviorism
87(1)
Skinner's Operant Conditioning
88(3)
Ausubel's Subsumption Theory
91(6)
Rote vs. Meaningful Learning
91(3)
Systematic Forgetting
94(3)
Rogers's Humanistic Psychology
97(2)
Types of Learning
99(3)
Transfer, Interference, and Overgeneralization
102(2)
Inductive and Deductive Reasoning
104(1)
Language Aptitude
105(2)
Intelligence and Language Learning
107(3)
Learning Theories in Action: Two Language Teaching Methods in Contrast
110(4)
The Audiolingual Method
111(1)
Community Language Learning
112(2)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
114(1)
Suggested Readings
115(1)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 4
116(2)
Styles and Strategies
118(34)
Process, Style, and Strategy
118(1)
Learning Styles
119(11)
Field Independence
121(4)
Left-and Right-Brain Dominance
125(1)
Ambiguity Tolerance
126(1)
Reflectivity and Impulsivity
127(2)
Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Styles
129(1)
Autonomy, Awareness, and Action
130(2)
Strategies
132(8)
Learning Strategies
133(4)
Communication Strategies
137(1)
Avoidance Strategies
137(2)
Compensatory Strategies
139(1)
Strategies-Based Instruction
140(8)
Identifying Learners' Styles and Strategies
143(2)
Incorporating SBI into the Language Classroom
145(2)
Stimulating Strategic Action Beyond the Classroom
147(1)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
148(1)
Suggested Readings
149(1)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 5
150(2)
Personality Factors
152(36)
The Affective Domain
153(1)
Affective Factors in Second Language Acquisition
154(14)
Self-Esteem
154(2)
Attribution Theory and Self-Efficacy
156(1)
Willingness to Communicate
156(1)
Inhibition
157(3)
Risk Taking
160(1)
Anxiety
161(3)
Empathy
164(2)
Extroversion
166(2)
Motivation
168(7)
Theories of Motivation
168(2)
Instrumental and Integrative Orientations
170(2)
Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation
172(3)
The Neurobiology of Affect
175(1)
Personality Types and Language Acquisition
176(3)
Measuring Affective Factors
179(1)
Intrinsic Motivation in the Classroom
180(2)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
182(2)
Suggested Readings
184(1)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 6
185(3)
PART III. SOCIOCULTURAL FACTORS
Sociocultural Factors
188(30)
Culture: Definitions and Theories
188(2)
Stereotypes or Generalizations?
190(2)
Attitudes
192(1)
Second Culture Acquisition
193(3)
Social Distance
196(4)
Teaching Intercultural Competence
200(3)
Language Policy and Politics
203(5)
World Englishes
204(1)
ESL and EFL
205(1)
Linguistic Imperialism and Language Rights
206(1)
Language Policy and the ``English Only'' Debate
207(1)
Language, Thought, and Culture
208(5)
Framing Our Conceptual Universe
208(3)
The Whorfian Hypothesis
211(2)
Culture in the Language Classroom
213(1)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
214(1)
Suggested Readings
215(2)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 7
217(1)
Communicative Competence
218(30)
Defining Communicative Competence
218(5)
Language Functions
223(3)
Halliday's Seven Functions of Language
223(2)
Functional Approaches to Language Teaching
225(1)
Discourse Analysis
226(6)
Conversation Analysis
228(2)
Corpus Linguistics
230(1)
Contrastive Rhetoric
231(1)
Pragmatics
232(3)
Sociopragmatics and Pragmalinguistics
233(1)
Language and Gender
234(1)
Discourse Styles
235(2)
Nonverbal Communication
237(4)
Kinesics
238(1)
Eye Contact
238(1)
Proxemics
239(1)
Artifacts
239(1)
Kinesthetics
239(1)
Olfactory Dimensions
240(1)
CC in the Classroom: CLT and Task-Based Teaching
241(2)
Communicative Language Teaching
241(1)
Task-Based Instruction
242(1)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
243(1)
Suggested Readings
244(2)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 8
246(2)
PART IV. LINGUISTIC FACTORS
Cross-Linguistic Influence and Learner Language
248(37)
The Contrastive Analysis Hypothesis
248(3)
From the CAH to CLI
251(3)
Markedness and Universal Grammar
254(1)
Learner Language
255(2)
Error Analysis
257(9)
Mistakes and Errors
257(2)
Errors in Error Analysis
259(1)
Identifying and Describing Errors
260(3)
Sources of Error
263(1)
Interlingual Transfer
263(1)
Intralingual Transfer
264(2)
Context of Learning
266(1)
Communication Strategies
266(1)
Stages of Learner Language Development
266(2)
Variation in Learner Language
268(2)
Fossilization or Stabilization?
270(3)
Errors in the Classroom: A Brief History
273(3)
Form-Focused Instruction
276(5)
Categories of Error Treatment
277(1)
Effectiveness of FFI
278(3)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
281(1)
Suggested Reading
282(1)
Language Learning Experience: Journal Entry 9
283(2)
Toward a Theory of Second Language Acquisition
285(34)
Building a Theory of SLA
287(4)
Domains and Generalizations
287(1)
Hypotheses and Claims
288(2)
Criteria for a Viable Theory
290(1)
Hot Topics in SLA Research
291(3)
Explicit and Implicit Learning
291(1)
Awareness
292(1)
Input and Output
293(1)
Frequency
293(1)
An Innatist Model: Krashen's Input Hypothesis
294(5)
Five Hypotheses
294(2)
Evaluations of the Five Hypotheses
296(1)
The Output Hypothesis
297(2)
Cognitive Models
299(3)
McLaughlin's Attention-Processing Model
299(3)
Implicit and Explicit Models
302(2)
A Social Constructivist Model: Long's Interaction Hypothesis
304(2)
Out on a Limb: A Light-Hearted ``Horticultural'' Theory of SLA
306(2)
From Theory to Practice
308(5)
A Reciprocal Relationship, Not a Dichotomy
309(1)
Suggestions for Theory Building
310(1)
The Believing Game and the Doubting Game
310(1)
The Art and Science of SLA
311(1)
The Role of Intuition
311(2)
Topics and Questions for Study and Discussion
313(2)
Suggested Readings
315(1)
Language Learning Experience: Final Journal Entry
316(3)
Bibliography 319(57)
Glossary 376(17)
Index 393(1)
Names 393(7)
Subjects 400


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