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Public Opinion : Democratic Ideals, Democtratic Practice

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9781608717965

ISBN10:
1608717968
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/1/2012
Publisher(s):
Cq Pr
List Price: $76.80

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Summary

In this revision to their lauded core text, Clawson and Oxley continue to link the enduring normative questions of democratic theory to existing empirical research on public opinion. Exploring the tension between ideals and their practice, each chapter focuses on a handful of exemplary studies so students gain a richer understanding of the research process and see methods applied in context. With new scholarship and data throughout, this second edition includes substantial new material on the critical role of groups in shaping public opinion, as well as recent developments in U.S. politics, such as public evaluations of President Obama, the power of new media, the rise of the Tea Party movement, and more.

Author Biography

Zoe M. Oxley is associate professor of political science at Union College. Her research interests include the effects of the media on public opinion, new media and political knowledge, political psychology, and women in electoral politics. Her work has been published in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, Politics Gender, Political Research Quarterly, Political Behavior, Judicature, and PS: Political Science and Politics.

Table of Contents

Tables, Figures, and Featuresp. xiii
Prefacep. xvi
What Should the Role of Citizens Be in a Democratic Society?p. 1
Public Opinion in a Democracyp. 3
Theories of Democracyp. 4
What is Public Opinion?p. 14
Defining Key Conceptsp. 17
Empirical Assessments of Public Opinionp. 22
Themes of the Bookp. 23
Key Conceptsp. 25
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 25
Appendix. Studying Public Opinion Empiricallyp. 27
Public Opinion Surveysp. 27
Experimentsp. 32
Interviewsp. 35
Focus Groupsp. 36
Content Analysisp. 37
Conclusionp. 38
Key Conceptsp. 39
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 39
Are Citizens Pliable?p. 41
Political Socializationp. 43
Childhood Socializationp. 45
Parental Transmission of Political Attitudesp. 49
Political Events and Socializationp. 57
Genetic Inheritance of Political Attitudesp. 61
Conclusionp. 64
Key Conceptsp. 66
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 67
Mass Mediap. 69
What Should Citizens Expect from the Mass Media in a Democracy?p. 72
What General Characteristics of the Mass Media Shape News Coverage?p. 73
What Specific Characteristics of the News Media Shape the Reporting of Political Events?p. 81
Are Citizens Affected by the Mass Media?p. 85
Conclusionp. 98
Key Conceptsp. 99
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 99
Attitude Stability and Attitude Changep. 101
Are Americans' Attitudes Stable?p. 102
Collective Attitude Stabilityp. 105
Presidential Approvalp. 109
Psychological Approaches to Attitudesp. 112
Conclusionp. 127
Key Conceptsp. 129
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 129
Do Citizens Organize Their Political Thinking?p. 131
Ideological Innocence and Critiquesp. 133
Converse's Claim: Ideological Innocencep. 135
Critiques of Conversep. 141
Related Evidence?p. 156
Conclusionp. 158
Key Conceptsp. 160
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 160
Pluralistic Roots of Public Opinion: Personality, Self-interest, Values, and Historyp. 162
Personalityp. 163
Self-Interestp. 173
Valuesp. 176
Historical Eventsp. 179
Conclusionp. 182
Key Conceptsp. 183
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 183
Pluralistic Roots of Public Opinion: The Central Role of Groupsp. 185
Party Identificationp. 186
Race and Public Opinionp. 189
Gender and Public Opinionp. 203
Conclusionp. 206
Key Conceptsp. 207
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 207
Do Citizens Endorse and Demonstrate Democratic Basics?p. 209
Knowledge, Interest, and Attention to Politicsp. 211
How Knowledgeable, Interested, and Attentive Should Citizens Be in a Democracy?p. 212
Are Citizens Knowledgeable about Politics?p. 214
Measuring Political Knowledgep. 221
Why Are Some Citizens More Knowledgeable than Others?p. 228
What Are the Consequences of Political Knowledge?p. 233
Are Citizens Interested in and Attentive to Politics?p. 234
Conclusionp. 237
Key Conceptsp. 239
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 239
Support for Civil Libertiesp. 241
Are Americans Tolerant?p. 244
Sources of Tolerant Attitudesp. 253
Contextual Influences on Tolerance Judgmentsp. 255
Are Elites More Tolerant?p. 259
Civil Liberties Post-9/11p. 262
Conclusionp. 267
Key Conceptsp. 270
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 270
Support for Civil Rightsp. 273
Public Opinion and Presidential Candidatesp. 275
Support for Civil Rights Policiesp. 284
Conclusionp. 297
Key Conceptsp. 299
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 299
What Is the Relationship between Citizens and Their Government?p. 301
Trust in Government, Support for Institutions, and Social Capitalp. 303
Trust in Governmentp. 305
Support for Institutionsp. 319
Social Capitalp. 325
Conclusionp. 333
Key Conceptsp. 334
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 334
Impact of Public Opinion on Policyp. 337
Should Public Opinion Influence Policy?p. 340
Is Public Opinion Related to Policy?p. 341
Do Politicians Follow or Lead the Public?p. 349
Public Opinion and Foreign Policyp. 357
Conclusionp. 363
Key Conceptsp. 364
Suggested Sources for Further Readingp. 364
What Do We Make of Public Opinion in a Democracy?p. 367
Conclusionp. 369
What Should the Role of Citizens Be in a Democratic Society?p. 369
Are Citizens Pliable?p. 370
Do Citizens Organize Their Political Thinking?p. 371
Do Citizens Endorse and Demonstrate Democratic Basics?p. 372
What Is the Relationship between Citizens and Their Government?p. 373
What Do We Make of Public Opinion in a Democracy?p. 374
Notesp. 375
Glossaryp. 413
Indexp. 429
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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