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Punishment : The Supposed Justifications Revisited

by
ISBN13:

9780745321318

ISBN10:
0745321313
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/20/2005
Publisher(s):
Pluto Press

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 11/20/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Summary

Ted Honderich's Punishment is the best-known book on the justifications put forward for state punishment. This enlarged and developed edition brings his writing to a new audience. With new chapters on determinism and responsibility, plus a new conclusion, the book also remains true to its original realism about almost all talk of retribution and proportionality. Honderich investigates all the commonsensical notions of why and when punishment is morally necessary, engaging with the language of public debate by politicians and other public figures. Honderich then puts forward his own argument that punishment is legitimate when it is in accord with the principle of humanity. Written in a clear, sharp style and seasoned with a dry wit, this is the most important work on the reasoning behind our penal systems. It is a pleasure to read for philosophers and non-philosophers alike. Ted Honderich is Grote Professor Emeritus at University College London and author of numerous books on philosophy, including After the Terror (Edinburgh University Press, 2002), How Free Are You? (Oxford University Press, 2001), Terrorism for Humanity (Pluto Press, 2003) and Conservatism (Pluto Press, 2005). He is also the editor of the Oxford Companion to Philosophy.

Author Biography

Ted Honderich is Grote Professor Emeritus at University College London and author of numerous books on philosophy, including After the Terror (Edinburgh University Press, 2002), How Free Are You? (Oxford University Press, 2001), Terrorism for Humanity (Pluto Press, 2003) and Conservatism (Pluto Press, 2005). He is also the editor of the Oxford Companion to Philosophy.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1(3)
1 Problem and Definition 4(13)
The Need to Justify Punishment
4(4)
The Definition of Punishment
8(9)
2 Backward-Looking Theories 17(41)
Retribution Theories in General
17(6)
Legal, Circular, and Intrinsic-Good Retributivism
23(6)
Distress-Culpability, Forfeited Rights, Indifference
29(6)
Innocence System
35(6)
Annulment, Offenders' Rights
41(5)
Rational Contract
46(2)
Consent to Loss of Immunity
48(5)
Satisfactions-in-Acting
53(5)
3 Grievance Satisfaction 58(16)
An Actual Reason
58(7)
System
65(4)
Defences and Criticisms
69(5)
4 Utilitarian Prevention Theory, etc. 74(38)
Questions of Fact about Prevention
74(12)
The Utilitarian Prevention Theory
86(3)
The Victimization Objection
89(6)
Utilitarians on Victimization
95(9)
Justified and Unjustified Victimizations
104(5)
Retrospect and Conclusion
109(3)
5 Reform, Rehabilitation, Treatment 112(18)
Punishment as Reformative
112(6)
Illness and Treatment
118(7)
Objections
125(5)
6 Determinism 130(33)
Punishment, Freedom, Responsibility
130(3)
A Sketch of Determinism
133(5)
Determinism Despite Quantum Theory
138(6)
Compatibilism and Incompatibilism
144(1)
Attitudinism
145(6)
Arguments for Compatibilism and Incompatibilism
151(4)
The Real Consequences of Determinism
155(3)
Punishment
158(5)
7 Compromise Theories 163(32)
Retrospect, Separate Questions
163(7)
Prevention and Retribution
170(6)
Correct-Values Retributivism
176(8)
Liberal-Community Retributivism
184(11)
8 Non-Problem, Other Conclusions 195(33)
The End of All Retributivism
195(6)
The Decent Society
201(5)
The Principle of Humanity
206(4)
Our Societies
210(6)
Our Unjustified Punishments
216(12)
Acknowledgements 228(1)
Notes 229(16)
Index 245


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