9780803975019

Qualitative Research Interviewing : Biographic Narrative and Semi-Structured Methods

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780803975019

  • ISBN10:

    0803975015

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-06-25
  • Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $94.00 Save up to $49.00
  • Buy New
    $91.18
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 7-10 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The eBook copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Unique in its conceptual coherence and the level of practical detail, this book provides a comprehensive resource for those concerned with the practice of semi-structured interviewing, the most commonly used interview approach in social research, and in particular for in-depth, biographic narrative interviewing. It covers the full range of practices from the identification of topics through to strategies for writing up research findings in diverse ways.

Table of Contents

List of Figures
xv
List of Exercises
xix
Abbreviations xxi
Preface xxiii
Introduction xxv
PART I: CONCEPTS AND APPROACHES TO DEPTH INTERVIEWING 1(70)
Overview
1(1)
Interview `Facts' as Evidence to Support Inferences to Eventual Theorization/Representation Models
2(14)
Data-collection (up to and Including the Interview) and Data-interpretation (from Interview to Researcher Product)
2(1)
Common-sense Hypothetico-inductivist Model
2(1)
Anti-common-sense Hypothetico-deductivist Model
2(1)
Inductivist and Deductivist `Moments' in Doing Research
2(1)
Some Features of Depth Interviewing as Designed Practice
3(3)
The Interview is a Research Interview
3(1)
The Interview is a Type of Conversational Face-to-face Interaction
4(1)
It has to be Particularly Well-prepared (Designed) to Allow it to be Semi-Structured
5(1)
It is an Interview `in Depth'
5(1)
The `Hard and only Facts' of Interview Interaction, and Inferences
6(8)
Old Wu: Knowledge of Discourse, Referents, Subjectivity
6(6)
Inference = Assumptions + Evidence-handling Argument against Counter-arguments
12(2)
Final Proposed Re/presentation Product/purpose Determines Appropriate Design of Data-generation/processing
14(2)
Conceptual Frameworks for Studying and Inferring from (Research) Interview Interaction Practice
16(35)
Interviews as Problematic
16(17)
Interview Interaction as Located Practice
16(1)
Vignette A: Lorna and John
16(1)
Past Interview Experiences for both Parties
17(2)
Interpreting Interview Data: Interview with `W'
19(14)
Conceptual Frameworks for the Study of Semi-Structured Depth Interviews
33(18)
An Under-researched, Historically Infrequent Social Practice
33(5)
Frameworks: Interactional and Anthropological-historical
38(12)
Summary
50(1)
Models of Research Design and their Application to Semi-Structured Depth Interviewing
51(9)
Model-building, Model-testing Sequence
51(3)
How to Think the Relation of Models to Evidence: Questions, Concepts and Indicators, the Problem of Operationalization/Instrumentation
51(3)
Classic Model of Pre-conceptualization, Pre-theorization and Stages of Theory-testing: Rose-Wengraf
54(2)
Maxwell's Model of Design Components
56(1)
Brief Note on Assumptions behind Inferences and Interpretations: Instrumentalists vs Realists
57(3)
Lightly and Heavily Structured Depth Interviewing: Theory-Questions and Interviewer-Questions
60(11)
Sequence and Spectrum: Brief Overview
60(1)
Theory-questions must be Distinguished from Interviewer-questions
61(3)
TQ and IQ linked by Instrumentation Theory and Assumptions
62(1)
The CRQ-TQ-IQ(II) Algorithm
63(1)
Theory-language and Idiolect
64(4)
Learning the Language (Idiolect) of the Interviewee
64(1)
The Theory-language of a Particular Research Community
65(3)
Depth-interviewing Designs and the Free-associative/Fully Structured Interviewing Spectrum
68(1)
Introduction
68(1)
Heavily Structured Interviewing
68(1)
Free associative and SQUIN Interviews
69(1)
Conclusion
70(1)
PART II: UP TO THE INTERVIEW: STRATEGIES FOR GETTING THE RIGHT MATERIALS 71(112)
Preparing for any Interviewing Sequence
72(39)
CRQ-TQ-II Design and Sequenced Combinations of Types of Interview and Selection of Informants Desired
72(2)
Personal Points of Entry into the Design Pyramid: Top-down Deductivists, Bottom-up Inductivists, Middle-level Research Question Entrists
73(1)
Theoretical Designing in Principle--not Including Designing of Interview Sessions or Particular Interviewing Strategies
74(1)
Formulating Purposes and Research Questions, Selecting Interviewees
74(35)
Purposes and Motivation
74(3)
Generating Research Questions Around Topics
77(18)
Sampling and Identifying Possible Informants
95(11)
Designing Sequenced Combinations of Interviewing Practices
106(3)
Summary
109(2)
Preparing Lightly-Structured Depth Interviews: a Design for a BNIM-Type Biographic-Narrative Interview
111(41)
`Single Question Aimed at Inducing Narrative (SQUIN)' in Context: an Instrumentation Theory and a Design for Narrative Interviewing
111(7)
Overview
111(1)
Variability of Narrative Interview Designs
112(1)
Single-question Interview Sessions
113(1)
Narrative in Itself and as a TQ-IQ Indicator
114(4)
The Design of SQUINs for the Purpose of the Biographic-Narrative-Interpretive Method (BNIM)
118(27)
Overview: three Subsessions, and Usually at Least Two Interviews
119(2)
Subsession 1 and Interviewer Self-restraint: Note-taking, Active Listening with Non-directional Prompts but Never Probes
121(16)
The Intersession Gap
137(1)
Subsession 2: Asking for More Story About Topics Raised Spontaneously in Subsession 1
138(4)
Self-debriefing on Subsession 2 to Paper or Tape
142(2)
Subsession 3: Questions Arising, and the Theoretical Relevances of the Interviewer→SSDI
144(1)
Interlude: Complementary (or Alternative) Research Designs
145(4)
Lieblich, Tuval-Mashiach and Zilber's Narrative-Interview Design
145(1)
Dolbeare-Schuman-Seidman's Narrative-Interview Design
146(2)
de Waele and Harre's Written Autobiographical Method
148(1)
Conclusion: SQUIN-BNIM and the General CRQ-TQ-II Model
149(3)
Preparing Moderately- or Heavily-Structured Interviews
152(31)
Variable Stance: Passive Listening to `Active' Interviewing
153(3)
Listening and Genres of Interviewing Experience
153(1)
Receptive and Assertive Practices
154(2)
Formulating IQs and other IIs for TQs and CRQ--General Logic
156(6)
General Orientation for the Development of Interviewer Questions and other Interventions
156(4)
The Structure of a TQ-IQ Question Schedule
160(2)
Formulating IQs and other IIs for TQs and CRQ-in detail
162(10)
Open and Closed Questions
162(1)
Leading and Biased Questions Contaminating the Response
163(4)
Generality/Specificity of Answer
167(2)
Length of Answer (Amount of Detail) Wanted
169(1)
Kvale's Process Typology
170(2)
Indirection and Strategies of Interviewee Text-production
172(10)
IQs `Echoing' or not `Echoing' TQs
172(2)
What Kind of Verbal Response (Text) is Wanted?
174(1)
Getting at Argumentation and Evaluation: Some Examples
175(7)
Conclusion
182(1)
PART III: AROUND THE INTERVIEW: CONTACT MANAGEMENT--THEORY AND PRACTICE 183(24)
Before Making Contact and Starting the Fieldwork Phase of the Research Process
184(7)
Ethics, Legalities and Practices
184(3)
Questions of Informant Access to Tape, Transcripts, Interpretations
184(1)
Legalities and Ethics
184(3)
Questions of Confidentiality and of Anonymity in any Publication or Use
187(1)
Pilot the Design: Rehearse the Session with a Volunteer
187(1)
Getting a List of Possible Interviewees and Making a Shortlist
188(1)
Making Initial Contact and the Calculation of `Framing'
188(2)
Questions of Arranging Initial and Possibly Later Sessions
190(1)
The Session
191(16)
Technical Management up to the Session
191(2)
Long-term Forward Planning
191(1)
Three Weeks Before the Interview: Pre-interview Material
192(1)
7-10 days Before the Interview
192(1)
The day Before the Interview
193(1)
Managing the Session
193(12)
Overview and Introduction
193(1)
Key Points in General
194(10)
Key Points for BNIM Interviewing
204(1)
Ending the Formal Interview well: the Last Five Minutes and the Reminder of `Post-interview' Arrangements
205(1)
After the Session: Instant Debriefing to Saturation
206(1)
PART IV: AFTER THE INTERVIEW: STRATEGIES FOR WORKING THE MATERIALS 207(94)
Overview
207(1)
Copying, Indexing and Transcribing
208(16)
Indexing--Clear Structure for Retrieving Dated Material
208(1)
Copying--Work only on Copies of Tapes
208(1)
Transcribing to Spark off Memo-izing and (also) to Produce a Transcript
209(15)
Transcribing to Produce Memos
210(2)
Transcribing to Produce a Transcript
212(12)
Analysing/Interpreting any Interview Materials: Answers to TQs
224(7)
Overview
224(1)
General CRQ-TQ-IQ Model: IM→ATQ→ACRQ
224(3)
The `Judicial Model'
227(3)
Conclusion
230(1)
Analysing/Interpreting SQUIN-BNIM Interview Materials: Answers to TQs
231(70)
Overview
231(3)
Preliminary Note
231(1)
The General ATQ→ACRQ Model Applied to this Model
231(1)
Intermediate Processing: from Raw Material to Processed Data
232(1)
From Relatively Mechanical Craft to a Craft-based Artistry
233(1)
Philosophy of BNIM Interpretation
234(2)
Five Stages of BNIM
234(1)
TQ Zero--Analysing the Communicative Interaction
234(2)
Lived Life--Told Story
236(1)
Generating the BDC and the TSS
236(19)
Biographical Data Chronology Constructed from Interview and Other Sources
236(3)
Generating the Told Story (Text Structure) Sequentialization from the Transcript of the Initial Narrative and Eventually from Subsession 2
239(16)
Doing the BDA and the TFA: Central Principles of Datum-by-Datum Analysis
255(29)
Datum-by-Datum Predictive Analysis and Retrospective Checking
256(2)
Panel work, Predictive Hypothesizing and Counter-hypothesizing
258(1)
Biographical Data Analysis of the BD Chronology
259(12)
Thematic Field Analysis of the Text Structure Sequentialization
271(13)
The Actual Told Story and the Original Possible Told Stories
284(1)
Towards Creating a `History' and `Structure' of the Case
284(15)
Representation of the History of the Case
285(7)
Microanalysis of Selected Text Segments: Part-whole Analysis
292(1)
From Case-history and Microanalysis towards `A Structure for the Case'
293(6)
Towards Theorizing the Case Life-history and Structure in the Light of your Research Problematic (RP-CRQ-TQ)
299(2)
PART V: COMPARISON OF CASES: FROM CONTINGENCIES OF CASES TO TYPES OF TYPOLOGIES 301(12)
Resources for Typification and General-Models Within Single-Case Research
302(8)
Multiplying Contingencies for Cases, Multiplying Types for Typologies
303(2)
Differences/typologies between the Particular and the General
305(5)
Types of Typologies
310(3)
A Typology of Typologies
310(2)
Typologies of Behaviour, Typologies of System
310(1)
Other Distinctions
310(2)
Conclusion
312(1)
PART VI: WRITING UP: STRATEGIES OF RE/PRESENTATION 313(67)
Introduction
313(1)
Conceptual Frameworks for Studying and Re/presenting
314(23)
The Problem: how is Understanding held, Conveyed, and Contested?
314(2)
Polkinghorne on Conveying Understanding by Bruner's Modes of `Paradigmatic' and `Narrative' Exposition
314(2)
Forms of Collection Distinguished from Forms of Presentation
316(1)
A Post-Spradley Conceptual Framework for Re/presentation
317(7)
The Six-level, Two-column Grid Derived from Spradley
317(3)
Zig-zagging between Columns and Across Levels
320(4)
Relating Theorization, Typology and Quotation
324(13)
Accounts of Accounts and going Beyond them
324(9)
How Researchers Construct Different Relations between their Theorizations and their Data
333(1)
Balance of Theorization, Typology and Quotation by Section
334(3)
Writings up: Theorizing and Narrating in `Presentation' Strategies
337(25)
Introduction
337(4)
Disclaimer: Collect Examples and Describe Structure
337(1)
Answering the CRQ-TQs-Default Genre
337(1)
Data-loss/Condensation as Emergent Condensed Re/presentation--News of Difference
337(4)
Macro-planning and Micro-planning
341(2)
Structure in Sections and Pages for Wordage
341(1)
Intuitive and Counter-intuitive Structuring-strategies
341(2)
Psycho-portraits
343(15)
Comparative Psycho-portraits
344(3)
Psycho-biographies: from Outside or Inside?
347(7)
Possible Models for a `Synthetic Account' of Multiple Informants
354(4)
Matrices and Flow-charts
358(4)
Flow-charts
359(2)
Matrices
361(1)
`Writing up' Biographic Sub-genres: Suggestions by way of a Conclusion
362(18)
Introduction
362(1)
`Writing up Harold' in more `Socio' or more `Psycho' Directions
363(3)
APPENDICES
Appendix A: Ruthrof's Typology of Told-Story, Presented-World, Positions
366(2)
Appendix B: Critical Linguistics/Semiotics Model
368(10)
The CLS Model
368(1)
CLS Model--Close Analysis of a Text Segment from Harold's Interview
369(9)
Appendix C: Informal Paralinguistics: A More Elaborate Example
378(2)
Bibliography 380(11)
Index 391

Rewards Program

Write a Review