9780325004921

Reading Essentials

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780325004921

  • ISBN10:

    0325004927

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 10/4/2002
  • Publisher: HEINEMAN

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Used and Rental copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

In this easy-to-read and research-based text, Regie Routman provides clarity, support, specific demonstrations, and confidence to teachers so they can teach reading well and get high test scores too - regardless of the reading program they use. Detailed lessons, immediately doable ideas, teaching tips, and lots of practical suggestions make this an essential text for excellent and enjoyable teaching and learning.

Author Biography

REGIE ROUTMAN is an internationally respected teacher and author who speaks at major educational conferences and conducts full day workshops for educators. Her current work and focus involves weeklong school residencies where she does daily demonstration teaching in classrooms, coaches teachers, and facilitates ongoing professional conversations. Currently, she lives in Seattle, WA. Regie's teaching experience of almost thirty-five years includes being a classroom teacher (for most of the elementary grades), a reading specialist, a learning disabilities tutor, a Reading Recovery teacher, a language arts resource and mentor teacher, and a staff developer. Her books are widely acclaimed as providing a solid, theory-based understanding of language learning along with a wealth of practical ideas and extensive, annotated resources. Because Regie writes in an honest, personal, and encouraging voice based on her daily experiences in classrooms, teachers find her books

Table of Contents

A Note About Notes xv
Acknowledgments xvii
One The Essential Reading Life
Simplify Your Teaching Life
3(8)
Why Reading Essentials?
4(3)
Be as Knowledgeable as You Can Be
5(1)
There Is No One ``Right'' or Best Way
6(1)
Question Research
6(1)
Teach What's Essential to the Well-Being of the Child as a Learner and a Developing Person
7(2)
What About Learners with Special Needs?
8(1)
Teach to the Child, Not the Label
9(1)
View Teaching as an Art Supported by Science
9(2)
Bond with Your Students
11(12)
How Does Bonding Work?
13(1)
Work Your Magic with Students
13(4)
Ensure Early Success for Every Child
14(1)
Model Respect
15(1)
Encourage Shared Decision Making
16(1)
Bring in Stories
17(3)
Tell the Stories of Your Life
17(1)
Value Children's Stories
18(1)
Read Stories Aloud
18(2)
Get to Know Your Students as Readers
20(1)
Learn About Student's Reading Lives at Home
21(1)
Enjoy Your Students
21(1)
Celebrate Your Life
22(1)
Share Your Reading Life
23(18)
Tell Students Why You Read
24(1)
Share Your Reading Habits
25(16)
Let Students Know What You Are Reading and What You Will Read Next
25(1)
Share Your Passion for Reading
26(1)
Discuss the Importance and Pleasure of Having a Personal Library
27(1)
Talk About Favorite Authors and Favorite Books
27(3)
Talk About How Book Clubs Work
30(1)
Explain How You Choose Books to Read
30(2)
Read a Variety of Genres
32(1)
Maintain a Reading Record
33(4)
Show Your Students How You Read
37(1)
Demonstrate Your Pleasure in Reading
37(4)
Two The Essential Reading Day
Teach with a Sense of Urgency
41(22)
Do More Teaching
42(1)
Rely on an Optimal Learning Model
43(4)
Demonstration
45(1)
Shared Demonstration
45(1)
Guided Practice
46(1)
Independent Practice
46(1)
Understand and Apply the Learning Model
47(3)
Work Toward Independence
48(1)
Promote Joy in Learning
48(1)
Put the Learning Model into Action
49(1)
Integrate Basic Skills into Challenging, Relevant Curriculum
50(2)
Focus on Language Acquisition, Not Just Letters and Sounds
51(1)
Ground Phonemic Awareness Work in Language Play
51(1)
Maximize Whole-Class Teaching
52(1)
Include Interactive Reading
52(1)
Connect Reading with Writing
53(4)
How Much Written Response Is Appropriate?
54(1)
Create Your Own Texts for Shared, Guided, and Independent Reading
54(1)
Put It into Action: An Integrated Reading--Writing Lesson
55(2)
Summary of Reading--Writing Activities
57(5)
Text-Solving Activities
57(3)
Word-Solving Activities
60(2)
Raise Your Expectations
62(1)
Organize an Outstanding Classroom Library
63(19)
Classroom Libraries and Books Improve Reading Achievement
64(2)
Expand Access for Struggling Readers
65(1)
Be Sure to Include and Value ``Light Reading''
65(1)
Take a Critical Look at Your Classroom Library
66(7)
Provide Lots of Choices and Books
67(1)
Find Out Students' Favorite Authors, Series, and Book Titles
68(1)
Pay Attention to Students' Interests and De-emphasize Leveled Books
69(1)
Include Lots of Nonfiction
70(1)
Make Books and Book Talk ``Hot'' in Your Classroom
71(2)
Make Classroom and School Libraries Attractive, Comfortable, and Accessible for Reading
73(8)
Involve Your Students in Library Design and Organization
75(4)
Teach Students How to Care for Books
79(1)
Start a Summer Reading Program
80(1)
Classroom Libraries Simplify Guided Reading
81(1)
There Is No Substitute for Quality Books
81(1)
Plan for and Monitor Independent Reading
82(16)
Students Need to Do More Reading
83(2)
Struggling Readers Need Much More Time to Read
84(1)
What Do We Mean by an Independent Reading Program?
85(2)
Research Strongly Supports Independent Reading
85(1)
Connect Independent Reading with Teaching and Evaluating
86(1)
Notice Where Independent Reading Fits in the Optimal Learning Model
86(1)
An Independent Reading Program Is Essential
87(4)
Set Up Classroom Procedures
88(1)
Value Independent Reading in Kindergarten
89(2)
Depend on Partner Reading
91(2)
Evaluate Partner Reading
93(1)
Teach Students How to Select ``Just-Right'' Books
93(5)
Establish Selection Guidelines
94(2)
Demonstrate That Reading Words Accurately Is Not Enough
96(1)
Don't Underestimate the Importance of Choice
97(1)
Make Assessment Instruction's Working Partner
98(19)
Make Assessment Work for You and Your Students
99(1)
Make Assessment and Evaluation a Daily Routine
100(1)
Regularly Evaluate Students Regarding the Texts They Are Reading
100(4)
Conduct Informal Reading Conferences
101(3)
A Framework for an Informal Reading Conference
104(4)
Child-Friendly Reading Goals
106(1)
Teach Intentionally
107(1)
Try Some Informal Reading Conferences
108(1)
Use Standards and High-Stakes Testing to Improve Comprehension
108(3)
Make Ongoing Accountability Central to Teaching Reading
111(6)
Have a School Policy in Place
111(1)
Work to Change Cumbersome District Policies
112(5)
Three Teaching Essentials
Teach Comprehension
117(13)
Teach Comprehension Right from the Start
117(1)
Start with the Texts Students Are Reading
118(1)
Demonstrate That Proficient Readers Use Many Strategies
118(3)
Be Careful About How You Teach Comprehension
119(1)
Balance Explicit Instruction with Lots of Time for Application
119(1)
Teach and Apply Your Own Comprehension Processes
120(1)
Make Your Reading/Thinking Process Visible
121(6)
Teach Rereading as the Single Most Useful Strategy
122(1)
Use Writing to Help Recall Key Points
123(1)
Teach Students to Survey Text Before They Begin to Read
123(1)
Make Connections
124(1)
Teach Self-Monitoring as Crucial to Understanding
124(2)
Interact with Peers to Increase Comprehension and Enjoyment
126(1)
Use Texts That Are Easy Enough and Meaningful Enough to Support Comprehension
127(2)
Keep Fluency in Perspective
128(1)
Teach Students How to Ask Significant Questions
128(1)
Use Caution and Common Sense When Teaching Strategies
129(1)
Emphasize Shared Reading
130(20)
Make Shared Reading an Integral Part of Your Reading Program
130(3)
Notice Where Shared Reading Fits in the Optimal Learning Model
131(1)
Use Shared Reading to Demonstrate Reading of All Kinds of Texts
132(1)
Add Shared Reading Aloud
133(1)
A Framework for Shared Reading Aloud for All Grades
134(5)
Observe Shared Reading Aloud in Action
139(11)
Enjoy a Picture Book in a Shared Read-Aloud
139(4)
Present an Informational Book Through a Shared Read-Aloud
143(4)
Introduce a Literary Genre Through a Shared Read-Aloud
147(2)
Evaluate Shared Reading Aloud
149(1)
Examine Guided Reading
150(35)
Clarify Guided Reading for Yourself
150(2)
Understand Where Guided Reading Fits in the Optimal Learning Model
151(1)
Be Cautious About How You Group Children
152(1)
Create Opportunities for Flexible Grouping
153(1)
Choose Books for Guided Reading Carefully
153(3)
Examine Your Book Collection for Quality
154(1)
Qualities of an Excellent Text for Guided Reading
155(1)
Establish a Workable Schedule
156(3)
Broaden Your Groups and Shorten the Time You Meet with Them
157(1)
Examine Your Instructional Reading Schedule
157(2)
Be Flexible About Guided Reading in Kindergarten
159(1)
Make Management Easy and Meaningful
160(3)
Have Students Spend Most of Reading Time Reading
160(3)
Make Sure Your Literacy Centers Are Worth the Time They Take
163(1)
Make Sure Your Management Techniques Are ``Manageable''
163(4)
Model Exactly What You Expect Students to Do
163(2)
Evaluate How Well Students Not in a Guided Reading Group Have Managed Themselves
165(2)
Plan Your Guided Reading Lessons with a Focus on Meaning
167(3)
Some Important Purposes for Guided Reading
168(2)
A Framework for Thinking About a Guided Reading Lesson
170(2)
Essential Materials for Guided Reading
172(3)
Excerpts From Guided Reading Groups
175(10)
Grade 1: Readers Who Struggle
175(3)
Grade 1: High-Achieving Readers
178(2)
Grade 2: Average Readers
180(2)
Grade 4: High Average Readers
182(3)
Four Advocacy Is Also Essential
Build on Best Practice, Know the Research, and Use Programs as a Resource
185(16)
Build on Best Practices in Teaching Reading
186(5)
Be Knowledgeable About Relevant Research
187(2)
Be Informed About the Influential National Reading Panel Report
189(2)
Know and Apply the Research on Effective Teaching
191(1)
Use Programs Only as a Resource
191(9)
Take a Close Look at Your Commercial Basal Reader
193(1)
Become Knowledgeable About Direct Instruction
193(2)
Ask Questions Before Any Program Adoption
195(3)
A Word About Computerized Reading-Incentive Programs
198(2)
Take Professional Responsibility for What You Believe
200(1)
You Only Have So Much Time
201(19)
Live an Interesting Life
202(1)
Spend Most of Your Time Thinking
202(3)
Trust Your Own Experiences to Help You Plan Well
203(1)
Keep Work Meaningful
203(1)
Keep Work Simple
204(1)
Make Every Minute Count
205(7)
Use All Time Spent with Your Students to Teach and Assess
205(1)
Make Ongoing Evaluation Part of Every Literacy Activity
205(1)
Keep a Lively Pace
206(1)
Create Structures That Maximize Participation and Learning
207(1)
Fight for More Time for Students Who Struggle
207(1)
Use Transitional Periods as Teaching Times
208(1)
Introduce ``Mystery Words''
208(1)
Make Work Done While Waiting for the Bell to Ring Sensible and Pleasurable
209(1)
Make Resources in the Room Useful and Easy to Access
210(1)
Minimize Coloring
210(1)
Reduce Interruptions
211(1)
Reevaluate Time Blocks
211(1)
Look at Your Schedule Carefully
212(1)
Make Time for Ongoing Professional Development
212(1)
Sample Teacher Schedules
213(5)
Take Part in Schoolwide Conversations
216(1)
Make Time for Personal and Professional Reading
217(1)
Do Less, More Effectively
218(2)
Build in Time to Reflect
218(1)
Cultivate a Love of Learning
218(2)
Enjoy! 220(1)
Without Human Caring, the Best Science Is Minimally Effective
221
Appendices
A. Selected Strategies for Struggling Readers
2(1)
B. 12 Practices of the Most Effective Teachers
3(1)
Letters to Parents
C. Why Independent Reading Is Necessary
4(1)
D. Help Your Child Choose a ``Just-Right'' Book and Encourage Home Reading
5(1)
Choosing Books
E. Use the Goldilocks Strategy to Choose Books
6(1)
F. Choosing Books for Independent Reading
7(1)
G. SSR Reading
8(1)
Reading Forms
H. Informal Reading Conference
9(1)
I. Reading Log
10(1)
J. Monthly Recording
11(1)
Brief Definitions of Terms 12(5)
Notes 17
Index 1

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