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Sensation and Perception

by
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780534558109

ISBN10:
0534558100
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/26/2006
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $273.66
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Summary

Helping you understand how you perceive what's around you-the wonder of seeing a face, hearing music, and smelling a rose-is what Goldstein's SENSATION AND PERCEPTION is all about. Writing clearly and using vivid full-color illustrations to clarify concepts, Goldstein shows you the importance of perception to your life. This textbook includes the latest breakthroughs in research and offers chapter-by-chapter correlation with online and multimedia resources that help you make the most of your study time. "Test Yourself" questions and "Think About It" exercises help you review and retain the material. The accompanying, "Virtual Lab" media exercises (available both on CD-ROM and online through the CengageNOW student tutorial platform) offer many animations and examples that clarify difficult concepts.

Table of Contents

Introduction to Perception
3(18)
Why Read This Book?
4(1)
The Perceptual Process
5(1)
Environmental Stimuli and Attended Stimuli
6(1)
The Stimulus on the Receptors
6(1)
Transduction
6(1)
Neural Processing
7(1)
Perception
7(1)
Recognition
7(1)
Action
8(1)
Knowledge
8(1)
Demonstration: Perceiving a Picture
8(1)
How to Approach the Study of Perception
9(1)
Levels of Analysis
10(1)
Communication Between the Levels of Analysis
11(1)
Measuring Perception
12(1)
Description
12(1)
Recognition
12(1)
Method: Recognition
12(1)
Detection
12(3)
Method: Determining the Absolute Threshold
13(1)
Method: Determining the Difference Threshold
14(1)
Demonstration: Measuring the Difference Threshold
14(1)
Magnitude Estimation
15(1)
Method: Magnitude Estimation
15(1)
Search
16(1)
Other Methods of Measurement
16(1)
Something to Consider: How to Get the Most Out of This Book
16(1)
Test Yourself 1.1
17(1)
Think About It
17(1)
If You Want to Know More
18(1)
Key Terms
18(3)
Virtual Lab
18(3)
Introduction to the Physiology of Perception
21(24)
The Brain: The Mind's Computer
22(1)
Early History of the Physiological Approach
22(2)
Basic Structure of the Brain
24(1)
Neurons: Communication and Processing
24(1)
Recording Electrical Signals in Neurons
25(2)
Method: Recording From a Neuron
25(2)
Basic Properties of Action Potentials
27(1)
Events at the Synapse
27(1)
Vision Begins in the Eye
28(1)
Light Is the Stimulus for Vision
29(1)
Images Are Focused on the Retina
30(2)
Demonstration: Becoming Aware of What Is in Focus
31(1)
Transforming Light into Electricity
32(1)
The Rod and Cone Receptors
32(1)
Demonstration: ``Seeing'' the Blind Spot
32(1)
Transduction of Light Into Electricity
33(3)
Test Yourself 2.1
36(1)
Pigments and Perception
36(1)
Dark Adaptation of the Rods and Cones
36(3)
Method: Measuring Dark Adaptation
37(2)
Spectral Sensitivity of the Rods and Cones
39(2)
Something to Consider: Transformations and Receptors
41(1)
Test Yourself 2.2
41(1)
Think About It
41(1)
If You Want to Know More
42(1)
Key Terms
42(3)
Virtual Lab
43(2)
Neurons and Perception
45(26)
Convergence: Many Neurons Sending Signals to One Neuron
46(1)
Convergence in the Retina
46(1)
Why Rods Result in Greater Sensitivity Than Cones
46(2)
Why We Use Our Cones to See Details
48(1)
Demonstration: Foveal Versus Peripheral Acuity
48(1)
Inhibition: How Activity in One Neuron Can Decrease Activity in Another One
49(1)
What the Horseshoe Crab Teaches Us About Inhibition
49(1)
Lateral Inhibition and Lightness Perception
50(4)
Demonstration: Creating Mach Bands in Shadows
52(1)
Demonstration: Simultaneous Contrast
53(1)
Displays That Can't Be Explained by Lateral Inhibition
54(1)
Test Yourself 3.1
55(1)
Neural Processing Interactions Between Neurons
55(1)
Excitation, Inhibition, and Neural Responding
56(1)
Introduction to Receptive Fields
57(1)
Method: Determining a Neuron's Receptive Field
57(1)
Processing Past the Retina
58(4)
Do Feature Detectors Play a Role in Perception?
62(1)
Selective Adaptation and Feature Detectors
62(3)
Method: Selective Adaptation
62(1)
Method: Determining Contrast Sensitivity
63(1)
Demonstration: Adaptation to Size
64(1)
Selective Rearing and Feature Detectors
65(1)
Something to Consider: Perception as Indirect
66(1)
Test Yourself 3.2
67(1)
Think About It
67(1)
If You Want to Know More
67(1)
Key Terms
68(3)
Virtual Lab
68(3)
The Organized Brain
71(22)
Maps: Representing Spatial Layout
72(1)
Method: Determining Retinotopic Map by Recording From Neurons
72(1)
The Map on the Cortex
73(2)
Method: Brain Imaging
73(2)
Columns: Organizing for Location, Orientation, and Ocular Dominance
75(1)
The LGN ``Club Sandwich''
75(1)
Location Columns in the Cortex
75(1)
Orientation Columns in the Cortex
75(1)
Ocular Dominance Columns in the Cortex
76(1)
How Is an Object Represented in the Striate Cortex?
76(1)
Streams: Pathways for What, Where, and How
77(1)
Streams for Information About What and Where
77(3)
Method: Ablation
78(2)
Streams for Information About What and How
80(2)
Method: Dissociations in Neuropsychology
80(2)
Test Yourself 4.1
82(1)
Modularity: Structures for Faces, Places, and Bodies
82(1)
There Are Face Neurons in the Monkey's IT Cortex
82(1)
Damage to the Temporal Lobe Affects a Person's Ability to Recognize Faces
83(1)
There Are Areas for Faces, Places, and Bodies
83(1)
Evolution and Plasticity: How Do Neurons Become Specialized?
84(1)
Is Neural Selectivity Shaped by Evolution?
84(1)
How Neurons Can Be Shaped by Experience
85(1)
The Sensory Code: How the Environment Is Represented in the Nervous System
86(1)
Coding by Neurons and Groups of Neurons
86(2)
Coding by Distributed Activity in the Brain
88(1)
Something to Consider: Are There Gandmother Cells After All?
89(1)
Test Yourself 4.2
90(1)
Think About It
90(1)
If You Want to Know More
90(1)
Key Terms
91(2)
Virtual Lab
91(2)
Perceiving Objects
93(28)
The Challenge of Object Perception
94(1)
The Stimulus on the Receptors Is Ambiguous
95(1)
Objects Can Be Hidden or Blurred
95(1)
Objects Look Different From Different Viewpoints
96(1)
The Reasons for Changes in Lightness and Darkness Can Be Unclear
97(1)
The Gestalt Approach to Object Perception
97(2)
Demonstration: Making Illusory Contours Vanish
98(1)
The Gestalt Laws of Perceptual Organization
99(3)
Demonstration: Finding Faces in a Landscape
101(1)
Neurons That Respond to Grouping
102(1)
The Gestalt ``Laws'' Are More Accurately Described as ``Heuristics''
102(1)
Perceptual Segregation: How Objects Are Separated
103(1)
What Are the Properties of Figure and Ground?
103(1)
Demonstration: Judging Similarity
104(1)
What Factors Determine Which Area Is Figure?
104(1)
How Do Neurons Respond to Figure and Ground?
105(1)
Test Yourself 5.1
106(1)
Modern Research on Object Perception
106(1)
Why Does the Visual System Respond Best to Specific Types of Stimuli?
106(1)
Must a Figure Be Separated From Ground Before We Can Recognize Objects?
107(1)
How Do We Recognize Objects From Different Viewpoints?
108(3)
How Does the Brain Process Information About Objects?
111(3)
Method: Region-of-Interest Approach
112(1)
Method: How to Present a Stimulus Briefly
112(1)
Method: Preparing Stimuli by Morphing
113(1)
Method: Delayed-Matching-to-Sample
113(1)
Something to Consider: The Intelligence of Human Object Perception
114(1)
Early Ideas About Perceptual Intelligence
115(1)
Modern Ideas About Perceptual Intelligence
115(2)
Demonstration: Shape From Shading
116(1)
Test Yourself 5.2
117(1)
Think About It
117(1)
If You Want to Know More
118(1)
Key Terms
118(3)
Virtual Lab
118(3)
Visual Attention
121(20)
Attention and Perceiving the Environment
122(1)
Why Is Selective Attention Necessary?
122(1)
How Is Selective Attention Achieved?
123(1)
Scanning a Scene
123(2)
Is Attention Necessary for Perception?
125(1)
When Can Perception Occur Without Attention?
125(1)
When Is Attention Necessary for Perception?
126(3)
Demonstration: Change Detection
127(2)
Test Yourself 6.1
129(1)
Does Attention Enhance Perception?
129(1)
Effects of Attention on Information Processing
129(2)
Effects of Attention on Perception
131(1)
Attention and Experiencing a Coherent World
131(1)
Why Is Binding Necessary?
131(1)
Feature Integration Theory
132(2)
Method: Searching for Conjunctions
134(1)
The Physiological Approach to Binding
134(1)
The Physiology of Attention
135(1)
Something to Consider: Do Neurons Notice Stimuli?
136(1)
Test Yourself 6.2
137(1)
Think About It
137(1)
If You Want to Know More
138(1)
Key Terms
139(2)
Virtual Lab
139(2)
Perceiving Color
141(26)
Introduction to Color
142(1)
What Are Some Functions of Color Vision?
142(1)
How Can We Describe Color Experience?
143(1)
What Is the Relationship Between Wavelength and Color Perception?
144(2)
Trichromatic Theory of Color Vision
146(1)
Behavioral Evidence for the Theory
146(1)
The Theory: Vision Is Trichromatic
146(1)
Physiology of Trichromatic Theory
147(4)
Test Yourself 7.1
151(1)
Color Deficiency
151(1)
Monochromatism
152(1)
Dichromatism
152(1)
Physiological Mechanisms of Receptor-Based Color Deficiency
152(1)
Opponent-Process Theory of Color Vision
153(1)
Behavioral Evidence for the Theory
153(1)
Demonstration: ``Opposing'' Afterimages
153(1)
Demonstration: Afterimages and Simultaneous Contrast
153(1)
Demonstration: Visualization and Color Scaling
154(1)
The Theory: Vision Is an ``Opponent'' Process
154(1)
The Physiology of Opponent-Process Vision
154(1)
Color in the Cortex
155(1)
Test Yourself 7.2
156(1)
Perceiving Colors Under Changing Illumination
156(1)
Demonstration: Color Perception Under Changing Illumination
157(1)
Chromatic Adaptation
157(1)
Demonstration: Adapting to Red
157(1)
The Effect of the Surroundings
158(1)
Demonstration: Color and the Surroundings
158(1)
Memory and Color
158(1)
Lightness Constancy
159(1)
Intensity Relationships: The Ratio Principle
160(1)
Lightness Perception Under Uneven Illumination
160(2)
Demonstration: The Penumbra and Lightness Perception
161(1)
Demonstration: Perceiving Lightness at a Corner
161(1)
Something to Consider: Creating Color Experience
162(1)
Test Yourself 7.3
163(1)
Think About It
163(1)
If You Want to Know More
164(1)
Key Terms
165(2)
Virtual Lab
165(2)
Perceiving Depth and Size
167(28)
Oculomotor Cues
169(1)
Demonstration: Feelings in Your Eyes
169(1)
Monocular Cues
169(1)
Pictorial Cues
169(2)
Movement-Produced Cues
171(2)
Binocular Depth Information
173(1)
Binocular Disparity
173(4)
Demonstration: Two Eyes: Two Viewpoints
173(3)
Demonstration: Binocular Depth From a Picture, Without a Stereoscope
176(1)
The Correspondence Problem
177(1)
The Physiology of Depth Perception
178(1)
Neurons That Respond to Pictorial Depth
178(1)
Neurons That Respond to Binocular Disparity
178(1)
Connecting Binocular Disparity and Depth Perception
179(1)
Test Yourself 8.1
179(1)
Perceiving Size
179(1)
The Holway and Boring Experiment
180(2)
Size Constancy
182(3)
Demonstration: Perceiving Size at a Distance
183(1)
Demonstration: Size-Distance Scaling and Emmert's Law
183(2)
Visual Illusions
185(1)
The Muller-Lyer Illusion
185(2)
Demonstration: Measuring the Muller-Lyer Illusion
185(1)
Demonstration: The Muller-Lyer Illusion With Books
186(1)
The Ponzo Illusion
187(1)
The Ames Room
187(1)
The Moon Illusion
188(1)
Something to Consider: Distance Perception Depends on the Environment and on the Self!
189(1)
Test Yourself 8.2
190(1)
Think About It
190(1)
If You Want to Know More
191(1)
Key Terms
192(3)
Virtual Lab
192(3)
Perceiving Movement
195(20)
Studying Movement Perception
196(1)
The Functions of Motion Perception
197(1)
Surviving to Perceive Another Day
197(1)
Perceiving Objects
197(2)
Demonstration: Perceiving a Camouflaged Bird
197(2)
Demonstration: The Kinetic Depth Effect With a Paper Clip
199(1)
The Moving Observer
199(1)
The Behavioral Approach: Taking Environmental Information Into Account
200(1)
The Physiological Approach: The Corollary Discharge
201(3)
Demonstration: Eliminating the Image Movement Signal With an Afterimage
202(1)
Demonstration: Seeing Movement by Pushing on Your Eyeball
203(1)
Test Yourself 9.1
204(1)
How Neurons Signal the Direction of Movement
204(1)
Determining the Direction in Which Oriented Bars Are Moving
204(2)
Demonstration: Movement of a Bar Across an Aperture
205(1)
Determining the Direction in Which Fields of Dots Are Moving
206(2)
Motion Perception and Experience
208(1)
Biological Motion
208(1)
Apparent Motion: The Occlusion Heuristic
209(1)
Apparent Motion: Limits Imposed by the Human Body
210(1)
Something to Consider: Implied Motion
211(1)
Test Yourself 9.2
212(1)
Think About It
212(1)
If You Want to Know More
212(1)
Key Terms
213(2)
Virtual Lab
213(2)
Perception and Action
215(18)
The Ecological Approach to Perception
216(1)
The Beginnings of the Ecological Approach
216(1)
Optic Flow
216(2)
Texture Gradients
218(1)
Affordances
219(1)
Navigating Through the Environment
219(1)
Do People Use Flow Information?
219(1)
Flow Is Not Always Necessary for Determining Heading
219(1)
Flow, Posture, and Balance
220(1)
Demonstration: Keeping Your Balance
220(1)
The Physiology of Navigation: Neurons in the Brain
221(2)
Test Yourself 10.1
223(1)
Skilled Actions
224(1)
Somersaulting
224(1)
Catching a Fly Ball
225(1)
Physiological Links Between Sensory and Motor Functions
226(1)
Effect of Damage to the Parietal Lobe
226(1)
Properties of Neurons in the Parietal Lobe
226(1)
Mirror Neurons in Premotor Cortex
227(1)
Something to Consider: Are We Watching the Same Movie?
228(1)
Test Yourself 10.2
229(1)
Think About It
229(1)
If You Want to Know More
230(1)
Key Terms
231(2)
Virtual Lab
231(2)
Sound, The Auditory System, and Pitch Perception
233(32)
Pressure Waves and Perceptual Experience
235(1)
The Sound Stimulus Produced by a Loudspeaker
235(1)
Amplitude and Loudness
236(1)
Frequency and Pitch
237(1)
The Range of Hearing
238(1)
Sound Quality: Timbre
239(2)
Test Yourself 11.1
241(1)
The Ear
241(1)
The Outer Ear
241(1)
The Middle Ear
242(1)
The Inner Ear
243(2)
The Cochlea
245(1)
Bekesy's Place Theory of Hearing
246(1)
Evidence for Place Theory
247(2)
Method: Neural Frequency Tuning Curves
247(1)
Method: Auditory Masking
248(1)
Updating Bekesy
249(1)
The Basilar Membrane as a Frequency Analyzer
250(2)
Method: Psychophysical Tuning Curves
250(2)
How the Timing of Neural Firing Can Signal Frequency
252(1)
Test Yourself 11.2
253(1)
Central Auditory Processing
253(1)
Pathway From the Cochlea to the Cortex
253(1)
Auditory Areas in the Cortex
254(1)
What and Where Streams for Hearing
254(2)
The Auditory Cortex and Perception
256(1)
Perceiving Pitch and Complex Sounds
256(1)
The Effect of the Missing Fundamental
257(1)
How the Auditory Cortex Is Shaped by Experience
258(1)
Something to Consider: Cochlear Implants---Where Science and Culture Meet
259(1)
The Technology
259(1)
The Controversy
260(1)
Test Yourself 11.3
261(1)
Think About It
261(1)
If You Want to Know More
261(1)
Key Terms
262(3)
Virtual Lab
262(3)
Sound Localization and the Auditory Scene
265(20)
Auditory Localization
266(1)
Demonstration: Sound Localization
266(1)
Cues for Location: Signals Reaching the Ears
267(2)
Cues for Location: Effects on Behavior
269(2)
Method: Virtual Auditory Space
269(2)
Judging Elevation and Other ``Ambiguous'' Locations
271(1)
The Physiological Representation of Auditory Space
272(1)
Interaural Time Difference Detectors
272(1)
Topographic Maps
272(1)
The Cortex
273(1)
Test Yourself 12.1
274(1)
Identifying Sound Sources
274(1)
Auditory Scene Analysis
274(1)
Principles of Auditory Grouping
275(3)
Hearing Inside Rooms
278(1)
Perceiving Two Sounds That Reach the Ears at Different Times
279(1)
Demonstration: The Precedence Effect
280(1)
Architectural Acoustics
280(1)
Something to Consider: Interactions Between Vision and Hearing
281(1)
Test Yourself 12.2
282(1)
Think About It
282(1)
If You Want to Know More
282(1)
Key Terms
283(2)
Virtual Lab
283(2)
Speech Perception
285(18)
The Speech Stimulus
286(1)
Phonemes: Sounds and Meanings
286(1)
The Acoustic Signal: Patterns of Pressure Changes
287(1)
The Relationship Between the Speech Stimulus and What We Hear
288(1)
The Segmentation Problem
289(1)
The Variability Problem
289(2)
Stimulus Dimensions of Speech Perception
291(1)
Invariant Acoustic Cues
291(1)
Categorical Perception
292(1)
Speech Perception Is Multimodal
293(1)
Test Yourself 13.1
294(1)
Cognitive Dimensions of Speech Perception
294(1)
Demonstration: Perceiving Degraded Sentences
294(1)
Meaning and Segmentation
294(1)
Demonstration: Segmenting Strings of Sounds
295(1)
Meaning and Phoneme Perception
295(1)
Meaning and Word Perception
296(1)
Speaker Characteristics
297(1)
Speech Perception and the Brain
297(1)
Brain Areas, Neurons, and Speech Perception
297(1)
Experience-Dependent Plasticity
298(1)
Something to Consider: Is There a Connection Between Speech Perception and Speech Production?
299(1)
Test Yourself 13.2
299(1)
Think About It
300(1)
If You Want to Know More
300(1)
Key Terms
300(3)
Virtual Lab
300(3)
The Cutaneous Senses
303(24)
Overview of the Cutaneous System
305(1)
The Skin
305(1)
Mechanoreceptors
305(3)
Pathways From Skin to Cortex
308(1)
Maps of the Body on the Cortex
308(2)
Perceiving Details
310(1)
Method: Measuring Tactile Acuity
310(1)
Receptor Mechanisms for Tactile Acuity
311(1)
Demonstration: Comparing Two-Point Thresholds
311(1)
Cortical Mechanisms for Tactile Acuity
311(1)
Perceiving Vibration
312(1)
Perceiving Texture
313(1)
Temporal Cues and Texture Perception
313(1)
Demonstration: Perceiving Texture With a Pen
314(1)
Test Yourself 14.1
314(1)
Perceiving Objects
314(1)
Demonstration: Identifying Objects
315(1)
Identifying Objects by Haptic Exploration
315(1)
The Physiology of Tactile Object Perception
316(2)
Pain Perception: Neural Firing and Cognitive Influences
318(1)
The Anatomy and Experience of Pain
318(1)
Cognitive and Experiential Aspects of Pain Perception
319(2)
The Physiology of Cognitive and Experiential Aspects of Pain Perception
321(2)
Something to Consider: Pain in Social Situations
323(1)
Test Yourself 14.2
323(1)
Think About It
324(1)
If You Want to Know More
324(1)
Key Terms
325(2)
Virtual Lab
325(2)
The Chemical Senses
327(24)
The Olfactory System
328(1)
Functions of Olfaction
328(1)
Detecting Odors
329(1)
Method: Measuring the Detection Threshold
329(1)
Identifying Odors
330(1)
Demonstration: Naming and Odor Identification
330(1)
The Puzzle of Olfactory Quality
330(1)
The Neural Code for Olfactory Quality
331(1)
Structure of the Olfactory System
331(1)
Describing the Olfactory Receptors
332(1)
Activating Receptor Neurons in the Olfactory Mucosa
332(3)
Method: Calcium Imaging
332(3)
Activating the Olfactory Bulb
335(2)
Method: Optical Imaging
335(2)
Method: 2-Deoxyglucose Technique
337(1)
Activating the Cortex
337(1)
Method: Genetic Tracing
337(1)
Test Yourself 15.1
338(1)
The Taste System
338(1)
Functions of Taste
338(1)
Basic Taste Qualities
338(1)
The Neural Code for Taste Quality
338(1)
Structure of the Taste System
339(1)
Distributed Coding
339(1)
Specificity Coding
340(3)
The Perception of Flavor
343(1)
Flavor = Taste + Olfaction
344(1)
Demonstration: ``Tasting'' With and Without the Nose
344(1)
The Physiology of Flavor Perception
345(1)
Something to Consider: Individual Differences in Tasting
346(2)
Test Yourself 15.2
348(1)
Think About It
348(1)
If You Want to Know More
348(1)
Key Terms
349(2)
Virtual Lab
349(2)
Perceptual Development
351(22)
Basic Visual Capacities
352(1)
Visual Acuity
352(3)
Methods: Preferential Looking and Visual Evoked Potential
352(3)
Contrast Sensitivity
355(1)
Perceiving Color
356(2)
Method: Habituation
357(1)
Perceiving Depth
358(1)
Perceiving Faces
359(1)
Recognizing Their Mother's Face
359(1)
Is There a Special Mechanism for Perceiving Faces?
359(2)
Test Yourself 16.1
361(1)
Perceiving Object Unity
361(2)
Hearing
363(1)
Threshold for Hearing a Tone
363(1)
Recognizing Their Mother's Voice
364(1)
Perceiving Speech
364(1)
The Categorical Perception of Phonemes
364(1)
Experience and Speech Perception
365(1)
Intermodal Perception
366(1)
Olfaction and Taste
367(1)
Something to Consider: The Unity of Perception
368(1)
Method: Paired Comparison
368(1)
Test Yourself 16.2
369(1)
Think About It
369(1)
If You Want to Know More
370(1)
Key Terms
371(2)
Appendix SIGNAL DETECTION: PROCEDURE AND THEORY
373(6)
Is There an Absolute Threshold?
373(1)
A Signal Detection Experiment
374(2)
Signal Detection Theory
376(1)
Signal and Noise
376(1)
Probability Distributions
376(1)
The Criterion
377(1)
The Effect of Sensitivity on the ROC Curve
378(1)
Glossary 379(19)
References 398(23)
Author Index 421(7)
Subject Index 428


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