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Service at Its Best : Waiter-Waitress Training,9780130926265
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Service at Its Best : Waiter-Waitress Training

by ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780130926265

ISBN10:
0130926264
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/23/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $102.40
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Summary

Ideal as a competency-based training guide or simply as a reference manual for specific service questions, this all-inclusive book explains the key aspects and responsibilities of today's food servers. It contains broad and in-depth coverage on everything a good waiter or waitress will need to know to be successful in this very competitive and dynamic profession-from restaurant industry statistics to how tips are calculated, the importance of poise and posture, the use of place settings, menu knowledge, the presentation of wine, recognizing nonverbal cues and prompts of guests, understanding guest paging systems and touch-screen terminals, handling complaints, and much more. Self-contained chapters flow in a logical sequence and establish a step-by-step procedure for understanding and learning appropriate server skills.

Author Biography

Ed Sanders is the founder and editor in chief of the Hospitality News Group, which publishes regional foodservice industry newspapers and an international education guide. He is a Certified Food Executive and a Certified Purchasing Manager; his professional career has included being chief operating officer for a regional chain of restaurants, an associate professor of business, and procurement director of a large-volume foodservice operation. He has a master of science degree in international management from the American Graduate School of International Management, and a doctor of business administration degree in management and organization. He was the co-founder and director of industry relations for the Hotel, Restaurant and Resort Management Program at Southern Oregon University. He is also co-author of Foodservice Profitability, A Control Approach, 2E (Prentice Hall, 2001) and Catering Solutions: For the Culinary Student, Foodservice Operator, and Caterer (Prentice Hall, 2000).

Paul Paz has been a career professional waiter for over twenty years. Restaurants USA, Restaurants and Institutions, Nation's Restaurant News, The Washington Post, Principal The Wall Street Journal, and several other publications have featured him in his WaitersWorld profession. He has also appeared on ABC's 20/20 news show. His column, "Tips for Tips," runs regularly in the Hospitality News Group of newspapers and he has written numerous articles for other publications. Furthermore, he is a hospitality consultant and has presented a variety of seminars throughout the Pacific Northwest. He developed a number of training programs for the Oregon Restaurant Education Foundation and is the only professional waiter ever to serve on the Board of Directors of the Oregon Restaurant Association. The Association voted him the 1997 Restaurant Employee of the Year. He also has served as president of the National Waiters Association.

Ron Wilkinson is the founder and CEO of Profit Power Systems, developers of FoodcoCost Control Systems and AIMHIRE-Employee Selection Systems. He is also the founder and director of the International Food Service Foundation. His forty-year career has included owning and operating quick-serve, family, and formal dining restaurants, and he has been a training director and vice president of operations for several large restaurant chains. He has developed and written operational and service training manuals and has taught college foodservice and restaurant management courses. He has also served on academic advisory boards for restaurant and hospitality management programs. He has presented numerous workshops at food shows, hospitality association conferences, and restaurant chain management meetings. He is a recognized expert at maximizing profit for foodservice operations of all types.

Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Perspective xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Organization of Text xv
An Effective Waiter-Waitress (Server) xvii
A Professional Association xix
From the Authors xxi
About the Authors xxiii
The Professional Waiter---Waitress
1(16)
Learning Objectives
1(1)
United States Restaurant Industry Statistics
2(1)
Income Opportunities
2(2)
Tip Credit
4(1)
The Saturday Market Theory of Waiting Tables
5(1)
Tipping
6(1)
Getting Stiffed
6(2)
Tipping and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
8(1)
Occupational Advantages
9(1)
Occupational Disadvantages
10(1)
Job Qualifications
11(2)
Advancement Opportunities
13(1)
Overview
13(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
14(3)
Professional Appearance
17(8)
Learning Objectives
17(1)
Grooming Standards
18(2)
Poise and Posture
20(1)
Uniforms and Aprons
21(1)
Shoes
22(1)
Server Health
22(1)
Overview
23(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
23(2)
Table Settings, Napkin Presentations, and Table Service
25(20)
Learning Objectives
25(1)
Preset Breakfast and Lunch Table Setting
26(1)
Preset Dinner Table Setting
27(4)
Wine and Beverage Setting
31(1)
Placemats
32(1)
Salt and Pepper, Sugar and Creamer
32(1)
Rolls and Butter
33(1)
Napkin Presentations
34(1)
Tablecloths
34(1)
Table Service
34(5)
Other Types of Service
39(2)
Salad Bars
41(1)
Dessert Tables and Carts
41(1)
Overview
41(2)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
43(2)
Serving Food and Beverages
45(26)
Learning Objectives
45(1)
Twenty-Five Tips for Proper Table Service
46(4)
Loading and Carrying a Tray
50(3)
Carrying Multiple Plates
53(4)
Carrying Glasses
57(1)
Service Priorities and Timing
57(2)
Handling Difficult Situations
59(3)
Customer Complaints---A Unique Opportunity for the Server
62(1)
Table Bussing
63(4)
Overview
67(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
67(4)
Service Preparedness
71(20)
Learning Objectives
71(1)
The Menu
72(6)
The Guest and the Menu
78(2)
The Server and the Menu
80(3)
Responsibilities that Support Good Service
83(4)
Service Teams
87(1)
Closing Procedures
87(1)
Overview
88(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
88(3)
Wine and Beverage Service
91(26)
Learning Objectives
91(2)
Proper Temperatures for Serving Wines
93(1)
Ice Bucket Usage
93(1)
Presentation and Service
94(3)
Decanting Wine
97(1)
Wine Glasses
98(1)
Wine Varietals
99(3)
Spirits and Cocktails
102(3)
Terms to Know
105(1)
Beers, Lagers, and Ales
106(2)
Responsible Alcohol Service
108(2)
Bottled Waters
110(1)
Coffee
110(3)
Tea
113(1)
Overview
114(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
114(3)
Guest Communication
117(20)
Learning Objectives
117(1)
A Personal Connection
118(1)
Server Enthusiasm
119(1)
Different Types of Guests
120(3)
Anticipating the Guest's Needs
123(1)
Nonverbal Cues and Prompts
124(1)
Suggestive Selling
124(8)
Taking the Guest's Order
132(2)
Service Timing
134(1)
Emergency Situations
134(1)
Overview
134(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
135(2)
The Technology of Service
137(14)
Learning Objectives
137(1)
Basic Point-of-Sale (POS) Terms
138(1)
Technology Applications
139(7)
Benefits of Technology
146(1)
Restaurant Websites
147(1)
E-mail or Fax
147(1)
Training with Technology
148(1)
Overview
148(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
148(3)
The Host/Hostess
151(8)
Learning Objectives
151(1)
Greeting Guests
152(1)
Table Selection
153(1)
Professional Courtesies
154(1)
Handling Complaints
155(1)
Taking Telephone Reservations and ``To Go'' Orders
155(1)
Server Supervision
156(1)
Menu Meetings
157(1)
Overview
157(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
158(1)
Waiter---Waitress Profiles
159(16)
Learning Objectives
159(1)
Profiles
160(8)
About AIMHIRE® Software
168(3)
Illustrative Example
171(1)
AIMHIRE® Tutorial Program
172(1)
Overview
173(1)
Discussion Questions and Exercises
173(2)
Appendix A Common Menu Terms 175(6)
Appendix B Wine Terminology: General, Sight, Smell, and Taste 181(6)
Appendix C Spirit Brands and Related Cocktails 187(6)
Appendix D Ales, Lagers, and Non-Alcoholic Beers 193(4)
Index 197

Excerpts

Organization of Text This book is written so that the chapters flow in a logical sequence, establishing a step-by-step procedure for understanding and learning appropriate server skills. The chapters are also self-contained, so that the reader can go directly to any chapter for specific information. Therefore, the book can be used as a training guide or a reference manual for specific service questions. Chapter 1, "The Professional Waiter-Waitress," introduces the reader to restaurant industry statistics and income opportunities, and explains how tip credit is calculated. "''The Saturday Market Theory of Waiting Tables" reflects how a server takes ownership in his/her job. The nature of tipping and tip income reporting responsibility to the Internal Revenue Service are explained. Occupational advantages and disadvantages are identified, along with the job qualifications and descriptions of advancement opportunities for servers. Chapter 2, "Professional Appearance," discusses the many aspects of grooming standards, the importance of poise and posture, the types of uniforms and aprons that may be used, the value of safe shoes, and the importance of server health. Chapter 3, "Table Settings, Napkin Presentations, and Table Service," identifies the basic table settings for breakfast, lunch, and dinner as the table is preset and as the meal is served, along with the appropriate wine and beverage settings. The use of placemats and the correct placement of salt and pepper shakers, sugar and creamers, and rolls and butter are explained. Twelve popular napkin presentations are illustrated with detailed steps for each presentation, along with the correct procedure for placing tablecloths. The specific types of table service are explained in detail, including the following: butler service, American service (individual plate service), English service, Russian service, French service, as well as counter service, banquet service, and room service. The use of salad bars and dessert tables and carts is highlighted. Chapter 4, "Serving Food and Beverages," sets forth 25 tips for proper table service, the correct procedures for loading and carrying trays, and the techniques of carrying multiple plates. Service priorities and timing along with effectively handling difficult situations are identified and supported with positive responses. Table bussing is detailed with procedures for using a cart or tray, as well as the procedure for setting up with the use of a tray, along with identifying additional bus attendant responsibilities. Chapter 5, "Service Preparedness," illustrates breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus, along with a wine list. The importance of menu knowledge by the server is emphasized along with the role of the server in helping the guest understand the menu and menu terms. The responsibilities of a server that support good service include completing side-work as well as following opening and closing procedures. The chapter also discusses when service teams are appropriate and how they function. Chapter 6, "Wine and Beverage Service," begins with identifying the proper temperatures for serving wines along with the correct procedures for using an ice bucket. The presentation and service of wine is illustrated step by step, beginning with presenting a bottle of wine to a guest, properly opening it, and the appropriate method of pouring the wine. The reasons and the procedure for decanting wine are also discussed. The various shapes of wine glasses are shown, identifying their appropriate use for the type of wine being served. Wine varietals are introduced and explained so that the reader gains a basic understanding of wine. Spirits and cocktails are discussed along with popular spirit brands, cocktail choices, and related terms the server should know. Beers, lagers, and ales are defined, and the correct procedure for serving beer is explained. Responsible alcohol service is reviewed and emphasized. The correct procedure for serving bottled waters is discussed. Coffee drinks that include espresso, cafe lattes, cappuccino, mochas, and the application of coffee with a spirit beverage are explained along with the use of the French press for coffee service. Tea varieties and service are also presented. Chapter 7, "Guest Communications," begins with the server personally connecting with the guest through an individual sense of enthusiasm. Varieties of possible guest types are discussed, along with tips for anticipating the guest''s needs and how to look for nonverbal cues and prompts. Suggestive selling is detailed, with techniques for selling the guest up, suggesting related menu items, suggesting new menu items or the chef''s specialties, suggesting items for special occasions, and suggesting take-home items. The guidelines for suggestive selling are presented and illustrated, along with methods of dining room showmanship. The correct procedure for taking the guest''s order is discussed, as is the guest check and the importance of service timing. Correct reaction in a professional manner to emergency situations is also addressed. Chapter 8, "The Technology of Service," identifies the basic point-of-sale (POS) terminology and presents technology applications. Table service management, guest paging system, product management software, hand-held touch-screen terminal, server paging system, two-way radio, electronic comment response, and various software applications are discussed, along with the benefits of technology. The uses of restaurant websites, e-mail, and fax applications are reviewed, as is employee training with technology. Chapter 9, "The Host/Hostess," begins with effectively greeting guests and table selection. Professional courtesies, handling complaints, taking telephone reservations and "to go" orders, server supervision, and menu meetings are all detailed in the discussion of the responsibilities of this important position. Chapter 10, "Waiter-Waitress Profiles," reflects the successful experiences of 10 servers as interviewed by Brenda Carlos, publisher of the Hospitality News Group. The servers were selected from fine-dining, family, and casual theme-type restaurants from across the United States. They range from a national waiter contest award winner, career professional, to a student working as a server part-time. The AIMHIREsoftware program can be accessed via the Internet and will introduce the reader/user to personality assessment software developed specifically for the foodservice industry. Appendixes A, B, C, and D have been designed to provide the reader/user with a quick reference source for common menu terms; wine terminology; spirit brands and related cocktails; and ales, lagers, and non-alcoholic beers. The video production Service At Its Best(ISBN 0-13-094792-X) further enriches this book with real-life applications that will inform and inspire the viewer. Contact Prentice Hall at 800-526-0485 or www.prenhall.com.


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