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Shaggy Crowns Ennius' Annales and Virgil's Aeneid,9780199681297
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Shaggy Crowns Ennius' Annales and Virgil's Aeneid

ISBN13:

9780199681297

by
ISBN10:
0199681295
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
2/28/2014
Publisher(s):
Oxford University Press
List Price: $133.33

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This is the edition with a publication date of 2/28/2014.

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Summary

Shaggy Crowns is the first book-length study in almost a hundred years of the relationship between Rome's two great epic poems. Quintus Ennius was once the monumental epic poet of Republican Rome, "the father of Roman poetry." However, around one hundred and fifty years after his epic Annales first appeared, it was replaced decisively by Virgil's Aeneid, and now survives only in fragments.

Looking at the intersections between intertextuality and the appropriations of cultural memory, Goldschmidt considers the relationship between Rome's two great canonical epics. She focuses on how -- in the use of archaism, the presentation of landscape, embedded memories of the Punic Wars, and fragments of exempla -- Virgil's poem appropriates and re-writes the myths and memories which Ennius had enshrined in Roman epic. Goldschmidt argues that Virgil was not just a slicker "new poet," but constructed himself as an older "archaic poet" of the deepest memories of the Roman past, ultimately competing for the "shaggy crown" of Ennius.

Author Biography


Nora Goldschmidt is a Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History at Durham University.

Table of Contents


Acknowledgements
Abbrieviations
Introduction
1. Reading Ennius in the First Century BC
2. 'Archaic' Poets
3. Sites of Rome
4. Punica
5. Epic Examples
Postscript
Appendix
Bibliography
Index


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