9780195134520

Signalers and Receivers Mechanisms and Evolution of Arthropod Communication

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780195134520

  • ISBN10:

    0195134524

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2002-02-28
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Summary

In most terrestrial and aquatic habitats, the vast majority of animals transmitting and receiving communicative signals are arthropods. This book presents the story of how this important group of animals use pheromones, sound, vibration, and light for sexual and social communication. Becauseof their small to minute body size most arthropods have problems sending and receiving acoustic and optical information, each of which have their own severe constraints. Because of these restraints they have developed chemical signaling which is not similarly limited by scale. Presenting the latesttheoretical and experimental findings from studies of signaling, it suggests that close parallels between arthropods and vertebrates reflect a very limited number of solutions to problems in behavior that are available within the confines of physical laws.

Author Biography

Michael D. Greenfield is a Professor of Biological Sciences in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Kansas, Lawrence.

Table of Contents

List of Symbols
xi
Communication in a Lilliputian World
3(6)
Communication, Signal, and Cues
6(2)
Scope and Coverage
8(1)
Signal Theory and the Language of Communication
9(13)
Channels, Signals, and Signal Characters
9(4)
Peripheral and Central Filters
13(2)
Sensory Adaptation and the Perception of Relative Intensity
15(2)
Noise and the Signal: Noise Ratio
17(2)
Information
19(1)
Reliability, Repeatability, and Redundancy
20(2)
Chemical Signaling and the Olfactory Channel
22(90)
Sexual Advertisement: Organic Lures and Beacons
23(50)
Courtship: Volatile Aromas as Reliable Indicators
73(9)
Nascent Sociality: Conspecific Cuing, Mass Attacks, and Swarms
82(6)
Social Behavior: Royalty and Altruists
88(4)
Social Behavior: Discriminating Insiders from Outsiders
92(6)
Social Behavior: A Call to Arms
98(4)
Social Behavior: Recruitment Trails
102(8)
Synopsis
110(2)
Sound and Vibration and the Mechanical Channel
112(118)
What Is the Mechanical Channel?
114(13)
Signal Transmission: Friction, Tymbals, Percussion, Vibration, and Tremulation
127(22)
Signal Reception: Membranes and Hairs
149(25)
Functions and Adaptations: Sexual Advertisement, Aggression, and Social Interaction
174(45)
Origins and Limitations
219(11)
Bioluminescence and Reflected Light and the Visual Channel
230(45)
The Nature of Light
231(7)
Signaling Along the Visual Channel
238(18)
Mechanisms of Visual Reception
256(16)
Perceptual Influences on Optical Signal Design
272(3)
Sexual Selection and the Evolution of Signals
275(15)
Exploitation of Receiver Bias
276(6)
Coevolutionary Mechanisms
282(8)
Signal Evolution: Modification and Diversification
290(7)
Genetic Coupling?
290(3)
Aberrant Signals and Preferences: Conducive Factors and Toleration
293(1)
Are Complex and Multi-modal Signals Favored?
294(3)
Notes 297(18)
References 315(72)
Glossary 387(6)
Taxonomic Index 393(6)
Subject Index 399

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