9780761912774

Spiritual Resiliency in Older Women : Models of Strength for Challenges Through the Life Span

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780761912774

  • ISBN10:

    0761912770

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1999-03-19
  • Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc
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Summary

Spiritual Resiliency In Older Women records the narratives of spiritually resilient older German and American women. The authors suggest how persons of all ages can gain maturity and spiritual coping by participating in communities based on faith, which acknowledge the emotion of spiritual experiences and integrate faith and close human relationships.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Introduction xi
PART I 1(92)
Alienation and Alignment of Children
1(24)
What Is Parental Alienation?
2(2)
Mild Cases of Parental Alienation
3(1)
Moderate Cases of Parental Alienation
3(1)
Severe Cases of Parental Alienation
4(1)
Review of the Literature
4(4)
The Evaluation Process
8(7)
The Alienating Parent
8(2)
The Alienated Parent
10(2)
The Children
12(2)
Other Reasons for Alignment With One Parent: What to Look for in the Children
14(1)
Summary and Recommendations
15(4)
When Alienation Is Present
15(2)
When the Child Is Aligned and Alienation Is Not Present
17(1)
Parentectomies: Do They Help?
18(1)
Case Example: The D Family
19(6)
Domestic Violence
25(18)
Approaching the Family's Domestic Violence Issues
26(5)
Categories of Domestic Violence
28(3)
Issues in Differential Diagnosis
31(5)
History of the Family's Domestic Violence
31(2)
Specific Questions to Ask Parents
33(1)
The Children in These Families
34(2)
An Objective Range of Access and Treatment Recommendations
36(4)
Access Issues
37(1)
Therapeutic and Structural Interventions
38(2)
Case Example: The V Family
40(3)
Allegations of Sexual Abuse
43(26)
Theresa M. Schuman
Background and Review of the Literature
44(2)
Common Scenarios in the Presentation of False Allegations
46(2)
Parent Factors Associated With False Allegations
48(3)
Other Parent Factors in the Allegations of Sex Abuse
51(1)
Child Factors in the Allegations
51(5)
Approach to the Investigation: Evaluation
56(6)
Parent-Child Observation Sessions
62(2)
Interpreting and Reporting the Results
64(3)
Visitation Recommendations
67(1)
Reunification Therapy
68(1)
Conclusions
68(1)
Move-Away Evaluations
69(24)
Review of the Literature
69(4)
Societal Issues
73(1)
Issues for the Courts
74(3)
Factors for the Evaluator to Consider
77(7)
Child and Family Issues
78(4)
Move-Related Issues
82(2)
Case Example: The S Family
84(2)
Case Example: The B Family
86(3)
Case Example: The L Family
89(4)
PART II 93(46)
Issues With High-Conflict Families
93(16)
The Nature of Personality Disturbances
94(2)
Neutral Decision Making (Special Master)
96(3)
Parallel Parenting
99(1)
Structured Recommendations
100(2)
Case Example: The G Family
102(3)
Case Example: The K Family
105(4)
Child Considerations in Custody Recommendations
109(18)
A Developmental Framework
109(10)
Infants and Toddlers (0-3 Years)
110(2)
Preschoolers (3-5 Years)
112(2)
School-Age children (6-12 Years)
114(3)
Adolescents (13-17 Years)
117(2)
Children's Reactions to Parental Conflict
119(1)
Giving Children a Voice Versus Protecting Their Privacy
120(2)
Weighting the Needs of a Single Chile Against the Needs of the Sibling Group
122(2)
Balancing the Individual Child's Real Needs With the Ideal
124(3)
The Components of the Evaluator's Recommendations
127(12)
Custody, Time-Share, and Parenting Responsibility
130(2)
Therapeutic Interventions
132(2)
Alternative Dispute Resolution for the Parents
134(1)
Directing Families to Move Forward
135(1)
Dissemination of the Report
136(3)
PART III 139(54)
Use of Psychological Testing in Custody Evaluations
139(14)
Review of the Literature
140(2)
Traditional Psychological Tests
142(6)
Objective Personality Tests
142(1)
Projective Personality Tests
143(1)
Tests Designed Specifically for Custody Evaluations
144(1)
Parenting Inventories
145(2)
Tests for Children
147(1)
Benefits of Using Tests
148(1)
Risks in Using Tests
148(2)
A Balanced Approach
150(3)
Cultural Issues in Evaluations
153(16)
Rosemary Vasquez
The Literature
153(3)
Acculturation Continuum
156(2)
Ethnic Identity and Adaptation
158(1)
Cultural Factors in Evaluation
159(4)
Cultural Issues
163(1)
Case Example: A Hispanic Family
164(2)
Case Example: A Chinese Family
166(1)
Conclusions
167(2)
Tackling the Terror of Testifying
169(12)
Attorney Roles
170(2)
Preparing for the Testimony
172(1)
Testifying Procedures
173(2)
Stick to the Data
175(2)
Dealing With Hypotheticals
177(1)
Remain Professional
177(1)
Trick Questions
178(1)
Dos and Don'ts for Testifying in Court
179(2)
Ethical Issues
181(12)
Confidentiality of Sources
182(1)
Abusive Clients
183(1)
Second Opinions
184(1)
Privilege
185(2)
Ex Parte Communications
187(1)
Dual Relationships
188(3)
``Perfect World''
191(2)
Conclusions 193(2)
References 195(8)
Name Index 203(3)
Subject Index 206(9)
About the Author 215(1)
About the Contributors 216

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