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Substance Abuse Counseling : Theory and Practice,9780131133235
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Substance Abuse Counseling : Theory and Practice

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131133235

ISBN10:
0131133233
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $82.66
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Summary

Known for clarity, accessibility, and practicality, this widely-used book thoroughly examines substance abuse in the population, addressing both ways to measure the problem and how to treat individuals and families who seek assistance. It educates prospective clinicians and counselors by guiding them, step-by-step, through the process of working with substance-abuse clients. Chapter content builds in sequence; however, each chapter can be taken as a stand-alone source of valuable information. Individual chapters on special populations add substantial depth to the text's treatment of its subject.

Table of Contents

Introduction to Substance Abuse Counseling
1(35)
The Context of Substance Use/Abuse
2(8)
Alcohol
3(1)
Cocaine
4(1)
Marijuana
5(1)
Opioids
6(1)
Amphetamines
7(1)
Hallucinogens
7(1)
Tobacco
8(1)
Caffeine
9(1)
Patterns of Use and Societal Costs of Substance Use/Abuse
10(10)
Patterns of Use
10(5)
Societal Costs
15(5)
Substance Use and Sexuality
20(2)
Alcohol
20(1)
Amphetamines and Cocaine
21(1)
Marijuana
21(1)
Intravaneous Opiate Drug Use
21(1)
Amyl Nitrate
22(1)
Substance-Related Diseases
22(1)
Hepatitis
22(1)
HIV/AIDS
22(1)
Working in the Field of Substance Abuse Counseling
23(1)
An Overview of This Book
24(6)
A Word About Process Addictions
30(1)
Conclusion
30(3)
References
33(3)
The Major Substances of Abuse and the Body
36(51)
The Brain
37(6)
Psychoactive Substances and the Brain
42(1)
Controlled Substances Schedules
43(1)
Depressants
44(17)
Alcohol
44(9)
Benzodiazepines
53(2)
Barbiturates
55(1)
Nonbarbiturate Sedative-Hypnotics
56(1)
Club Drugs
57(1)
GHB
57(2)
Opiates
59(2)
Stimulants
61(9)
Cocaine
62(3)
Amphetamines
65(2)
Minor Stimulant: Nicotine
67(2)
Minor Stimulant: Caffeine
69(1)
Cannabis
70(3)
Hallucinogens
73(4)
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD)
74(1)
Phencyclidine (PCP)
75(1)
Ketamine
76(1)
Club Drugs
77(2)
MDMA (Ecstasy)
78(1)
Volatile Substances or Inhalants
79(2)
Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids
81(1)
Conclusion
82(1)
References
83(4)
Etiological Theories of Substance Abuse
87(36)
Moral Theory
88(1)
Disease Theory
89(2)
Strengths and Limitations of Disease Theory
90(1)
Summary
91(1)
Biological and Genetic Theories
91(8)
Genetic Studies on Alcoholism
92(4)
Genetic Studies on Other Substance Abuse
96(2)
Strengths and Limitations of Biological and Genetic Theories
98(1)
Summary
98(1)
Systems Theory
99(7)
Malfunctions in the Family System
100(1)
Alcoholic Families
101(2)
Substance-Abusing Families
103(2)
Strengths and Limitations of Systems Theory
105(1)
Summary
106(1)
Behavioral Theory
106(4)
Strengths and Limitations of Behavioral Theory
109(1)
Summary
109(1)
Sociocultural Theory
110(4)
Alcohol Abuse
110(1)
Substance Abuse
111(2)
Strengths and Limitations of Sociocultural Theory
113(1)
Summary
114(1)
An Integration of Theories
114(2)
Strengths and Limitations of Integrated Theories
116(1)
Summary
116(1)
Conclusion
116(4)
References
120(3)
Assessment and Diagnosis
123(36)
Assessment Case: Jon
123(1)
Assessment Methods and Issues
124(1)
The Diagnostic Interview
125(12)
DSM-IV-TR Diagnosis
127(1)
Behavioral Characteristics
128(5)
Assessing Behavioral Symptoms
133(2)
Family Characteristics
135(1)
Assessing the Social and Family-Related Symptoms
136(1)
Major Assessment and Diagnostic Instruments
137(7)
The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)
138(1)
Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (SMAST)
139(1)
The Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-20)
140(1)
The CAGE Questionnaire
140(1)
The Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3 (SASSI-3)
141(1)
The Alcohol Use Inventory (AUI)
142(1)
The Addictions Severity Index (ASI)
142(1)
The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2)
143(1)
Diagnosis
144(7)
Differential Diagnosis
145(1)
Dual Diagnosis
146(5)
References
151(2)
Appendix A: Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (Mast)
153(1)
Appendix B: Drug Use Questionnaire (Dast-20)
154(1)
Appendix C: Adult Cage Questionnaire
155(1)
Appendix D: Substance Use History Questionnaire
156(3)
Treatment Planning and Treatment Setting
159(28)
What Is Treatment Planning?
160(10)
Understanding the Terminology
160(1)
Treatment Plan Requirements
161(2)
The Elements of a Substance Abuse/Dependency Treatment Plan
163(4)
External Reviewers of Treatment Planning: Health Care Accreditation Organizations and Managed Care
167(3)
What is a Treatment Setting?
170(2)
Types of Treatment Settings
172(9)
Medical Detoxification and Stabilization
172(1)
Dual-Diagnosis Hospital Inpatient
173(2)
Free-Standing Rehabilitation and Residential Programs
175(3)
Partial Hospitalization
178(1)
Temporary Recovery or Halfway Homes
178(1)
Intensive Outpatient
179(2)
The Importance of Matching Treatment to Client Needs
181(2)
Conclusion
183(1)
References
183(2)
Appendix: 12-Step, 12-Tradition Groups
185(2)
Individual and Group Treatment
187(26)
Getting the Individual Into Treatment
188(4)
Coercive versus Voluntary Treatment
188(1)
The Process of Intervention
189(3)
Summary
192(1)
Individual Therapy
192(8)
Direct-Effect Strategies
193(2)
Broad-Spectrum Strategies
195(5)
Summary
200(1)
Group Therapy
200(6)
Therapeutic Factors in Group Therapy
202(1)
Group Dynamics
203(3)
Psychoeducational Groups
206(1)
Summary
206(1)
Other Types of Treatment
206(1)
Counselor Characteristics
206(2)
Conclusion
208(1)
References
208(5)
Family Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment
213(26)
Defining Family
215(1)
General Systems Concepts
215(5)
Homeostasis
216(1)
Feedback Loops
216(1)
Hierarchy, Roles, Rules, Subsystems, and Boundaries
217(2)
Wholeness
219(1)
Change
219(1)
Family Values
219(1)
The Addictive Family System
220(2)
The Marital Dyad and Substance Abuse
220(2)
The Family and Substance Abuse
222(6)
Children in the Addictive Family
224(1)
Siblings in the Addictive Family
225(1)
Children's Roles
225(2)
Summary
227(1)
Treatment with Addictive Families
228(5)
The Process of Treatment
230(3)
How Successful is Family Therapy?
233(1)
Conclusion
233(3)
References
236(3)
Working with Selected Populations: Treatment Issues and Characteristics
239(27)
Children and Adolescents
239(5)
Risk Factors
241(2)
Prevention and Intervention
243(1)
Women
244(4)
Risk Factors
245(2)
Prevention and Intervention
247(1)
The Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender Community
248(4)
GLBT Identity Development
249(1)
Risk Factors
250(1)
Prevention and Intervention
251(1)
People With Disabilities
252(3)
Risk Factors
253(1)
Prevention and Intervention
254(1)
The Elderly
255(2)
Risk Factors
256(1)
Prevention and Intervention
257(1)
The Homeless
257(3)
Risk Factors
259(1)
Prevention and Intervention
260(1)
Conclusion
260(1)
References
261(5)
Working with Diverse Cultures: Revisiting Issues in Prevention and Intervention
266(25)
American Indians and Alaskan Natives
266(5)
Risk Factors
268(2)
Barriers to Treatment
270(1)
Prevention and Intervention
270(1)
Asian Americans
271(5)
Cultural Values
272(1)
Risk Factors
273(2)
Prevention and Intervention
275(1)
African Americans
276(5)
Risk Factors
277(1)
Cultural Values
278(1)
Barriers to Treatment
279(1)
Prevention and Intervention
280(1)
Hispanics
281(5)
Cultural Values
282(2)
Barriers to Treatment
284(1)
Prevention and Intervention
285(1)
Conclusion
286(1)
References
287(4)
Sustaining Behavior Change: Relapse Prevention Strategies
291(23)
Determinants of Relapse
294(4)
Environmental
294(2)
Behavioral
296(1)
Cognitive
296(1)
Affective
296(1)
Relational
297(1)
Summary
298(1)
Alcoholics Anonymous Model
298(5)
Giving Up Control to Gain Control
299(1)
Self-Examination
300(1)
Making Amends
300(1)
Group Participation
301(1)
Daily Reminders
301(1)
How Effective Is AA?
301(1)
AA Associated 12-Step Programs
302(1)
A Psychoeducational Model: Rational Recovery
303(1)
Developmental Models
304(2)
The Gorski Model
304(1)
The Stage Model
305(1)
A Cognitive-Behavioral/Social Learning Model
306(4)
Social Learning Theories
307(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Model
308(2)
The Concept of Re-Joyment
310(1)
Conclusion
311(1)
References
311(3)
Prevention
314(25)
Types of Prevention
317(1)
Prevention: A Brief History
318(4)
Comprehensive Prevention
322(9)
Project Hope: Comprehensive Prevention in Practice
323(2)
Risk and Protective Factors
325(4)
Life Skills Training (LST): Effectiveness of a Comprehensive Prevention Approach
329(2)
Steps to an Effective Prevention Program
331(1)
Implications for Counseling
332(2)
Conclusion
334(1)
References
335(4)
Research and Contemporary Issues
339(34)
Research
339(10)
Problems with Substance Abuse Research
339(2)
Alcoholism Outcome Research
341(3)
Methadone Maintenance Outcome Research
344(1)
Cocaine Studies
345(1)
Outpatient Programs Research
346(2)
Inpatient Programs Research
348(1)
Specific Practice Effectiveness
349(7)
The 12-Step Programs
349(2)
Individual Counseling Programs
351(1)
Group Counseling Programs
352(1)
Family Therapy
353(1)
Multidimensional Programs
354(1)
Best Practices
354(1)
Summary
355(1)
Contemporary Issues
356(10)
The Disease Concept of Alcoholism: Still Questions
356(2)
Defining Abuse within the Context of Diagnosis
358(1)
Determining Treatment Goals
358(1)
Funding
359(1)
Gender Issues and the Use of Drugs
360(1)
Training and Background of Substance Abuse Counselors
361(1)
Ethical Issues and Substance Abuse Counseling
362(1)
Burnout
363(1)
Ethnic Minorities and Substance Abuse
363(1)
Medications and Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
364(1)
Dance Floor Pharmacology
365(1)
Conclusion
366(1)
References
366(7)
Index 373

Excerpts

Substance abuse ranks as one of the major public health issues in today's society. Whether directly or indirectly, abuse is responsible for increased risk of violence in the home, suicide, mental illness, work-related accidents, and approximately half of all fatal automobile crashes. The use and abuse of substances span gender, socioeconomic levels, ethnicity, age, religion, profession, geography, and most dimensions of human existence and background. All people during their lifetimes will be touched by substance abuse or addiction; therefore, clinicians should be adequately trained to recognize the enormity of this problem, how to assess it, and ultimately how to treat individuals and families who come for assistance. Comprehensive programs at undergraduate and graduate levels are now in place in many settings, systematically studying substance abuse and subsequent treatment modalities. This book was developed to be helpful for the general clinician as well as for students in beginning substance abuse classes and as an adjunct to, but not a replacement for, counseling theory and techniques books and coursework. Contributors to this edition have extensive backgrounds in substance abuse work as well as special knowledge in a particular segment of the field. Space and time limitations prevent us from examining many of the issues in the field: public policy, working in a school setting, substance abuse in the workplace, HIV/AIDS and drug use, and a more in-depth study of the dualdiagnosis issues of mental illness and substance abuse. The book takes the reader through the process of working with substanceabusing clients. Chapters build on each other, yet can be used independently as resources for information. Because it is impossible to portray a "real" client, case histories were developed and are used to offer a sense of practical application in each chapter. These case discussions provide a sample of the types of issues presented when working with this population. The authors believe that knowing about all aspects of the treatment process are essential to assisting clients toward recovery. We have endeavored to structure the book in a manner that reflects treatment from first contact to recovery. We hope that you find this book to be an enjoyable and practical read as well as helpful in your practice.


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