9780521821810

The Syntax-Morphology Interface: A Study of Syncretism

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  • ISBN13:

    9780521821810

  • ISBN10:

    0521821819

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2005-10-31
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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Summary

This pioneering book provides a full-length study of inflectional syncretism, presenting a typology of its occurrence across a wide range of languages.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
List of abbreviations and symbols
xvii
Introduction
1(12)
History of the notion
3(1)
Delimiting the notion of syncretism
4(3)
Scope of the investigation
7(2)
Typological methodology
7(1)
Selection of forms
8(1)
Accidental versus systematic homophony
9(1)
Using this book
10(3)
Supporting materials
10(1)
Glossing conventions
11(1)
Structure of the book
12(1)
Characteristics of syncretism
13(24)
Syncretic paradigms
13(4)
Types
13(4)
Implications
17(1)
Domains of comparison
17(6)
Morphological classes
17(2)
Feature values
19(4)
Morphological characteristics
23(4)
A typology of interpretations
27(8)
Syncretism as neutralization
28(2)
Syncretism as uninflectedness
30(3)
Canonical syncretism
33(2)
Conclusion
35(2)
Cross-linguistic typology of features
37(89)
Case
38(19)
Introduction
38(2)
Types of case syncretism
40(16)
Conclusion
56(1)
Person
57(18)
Introduction
57(2)
Patterns of syncretism
59(4)
Directional effects
63(7)
Diachrony
70(5)
Summary
75(1)
Person syncretism in two-place verbs
75(6)
Introduction
75(1)
Syncretism of subject person
76(3)
Syncretism of object person
79(1)
Other patterns
80(1)
Summary
81(1)
Gender
81(11)
Introduction
81(1)
Gender and number
82(1)
Smaller systems
83(3)
Larger systems
86(4)
Syncretism restricted by target
90(1)
Summary
91(1)
Number
92(3)
Introduction
92(1)
Values
93(1)
Directionality
94(1)
Summary
95(1)
Tense-aspect-mood
95(8)
Introduction
95(1)
Affix suppression
96(4)
Syncretic affixes
100(1)
Compound systems
101(2)
Summary
103(1)
Polarity effects
103(8)
Introduction
103(2)
Morphological systematicity
105(3)
Semantic systematicity
108(3)
Summary
111(1)
The interaction of features
111(13)
Introduction
111(1)
Syncretisms and their contexts
112(1)
Nominal feature interactions
113(1)
Typologies of interaction
113(1)
Exploring interaction
114(4)
Constraints on nominal features
118(1)
Verbal feature interactions
119(1)
Verbal paradigms
120(1)
Exploring the verb data
121(2)
Interpreting the generalisations
123(1)
Number, case and gender on nominals
123(1)
TAM and agreement on verbs
123(1)
Summary
124(1)
Conclusion
124(2)
Formal representation
126(45)
Introduction
126(1)
Defining sets of values
126(7)
Natural classes
126(5)
Unnatural classes
131(1)
A note on polarity effects
132(1)
Symmetrical versus directional rules
133(17)
Convergent bidirectional syncretism
136(3)
Divergent bidirectional syncretism
139(5)
Symmetrical versus directional rules: a summary
144(1)
Ranked constraints as an alternative to directional syncretism
145(5)
Possible constraints on syncretism
150(16)
Variants on hierarchical structures
150(1)
Carstairs (1987), Carstairs-McCarthy (1998a, b)
151(9)
Impoverishment
160(3)
Stump (2001) and Zwicky (2000)
163(3)
Summary
166(5)
Predictions and counter-examples
166(3)
Towards a model of syncretism
169(2)
Formal framework and case studies
171(48)
Network Morphology and syncretism
172(11)
Inferential-realizational theories and morphology
175(2)
Default inheritance
177(3)
Underspecification and semantic naturalness
180(2)
Systematicity in Network Morphology
182(1)
Case study 1: Dhaasanac
183(3)
Case study 2: The Dalabon verbal system
186(18)
The structure of the Dalabon intransitive paradigm
187(1)
The Dalabon transitive paradigm and the inadequacy of underspecification
188(6)
The Dalabon transitive paradigm: a generalized referral analysis
194(5)
The verbal hierarchy
199(1)
The shape of the verbal paradigm
200(3)
Referral of 1 > 2SG to 3 > 2SG
203(1)
Referral of 2 > 1 to 3 > 1
203(1)
Dalabon: summing up
203(1)
Case study 3: The Russian nominal system
204(13)
Domains of syncretism
206(1)
Phonologically determined `syncretism'
206(1)
Lexically determined syncretism
206(1)
Morphologically determined syncretism
207(6)
Candidates for syntactically determined syncretism
213(3)
Orthogonal specification of syncretism
216(1)
Conclusion
217(2)
Conclusion
219(4)
Taking stock
219(1)
Results
220(1)
Consequences
221(2)
Appendix 1: Case syncretism in the World Atlas of Language Structures sample 223(5)
Appendix 2: Person syncretism in the World Atlas of Language Structures sample 228(5)
Appendix 3: Syncretism in two-place verbs in the World Atlas of Language Structures corpus 233(3)
Appendix 4: DATR fragment for Dhasaanac case study 236(6)
Appendix 5: DATR fragment for Dalabon case study 242(6)
Appendix 6: DATR fragment for Russian case study 248(6)
References 254(17)
Author index 271(4)
Language index 275(4)
Subject index 279

Excerpts

"This book provides the first full-length study of inflectional syncretism, presenting a typology of its occurrence across a wide range of languages. The implications of syncretism for the syntax-morphology interface have long been recognized: it argues either for an enriched model of feature structure (thereby preserving a direct link between function and form), or for the independence of morphological structure from syntactic structure. The Syntax-Morphology Interface presents a compelling argument for the autonomy of morphology, and the resulting analysis is illustrated in a series of formal case studies within Network Morphology. It will be welcomed by all linguists interested in the relation between words and the larger units of which they are a part."--BOOK JACKET.

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