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Teaching Children to Read : Putting the Pieces Together,9780130998354
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Teaching Children to Read : Putting the Pieces Together

by ;
ISBN13:

9780130998354

ISBN10:
0130998354
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/1/1999
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE HALL
List Price: $117.75

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Summary

For courses in Reading Methods in Elementary School. This Elementary Reading Methods text is the only one on the market that offers a transitional perspective to teach reading in a balanced way. It provides theoretical guidelines and methodology to combine both the use of basals and skills based instruction with a more balanced approach to teaching reading. The authors introduce seven principles that support literacy development and examine them closely throughout the text. These principles undergird the philosophical methodology pre-service teachers use to develop their own model of balanced literacy instruction.

Author Biography

D. Ray Reutzel is the Provost and academic vice president at Southern Utah University.

Table of Contents

PART I: UNDERSTANDING AND SUPPORTING LITERACY DEVELOPMENT: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE
Reading Instruction: Making the Transition to a Balanced Perspective
2(12)
Transitions: A Model for Changing Teachers' Instructional Practices
4(3)
Traditional Approaches
4(1)
Whole Language
4(1)
Balanced Literacy Programs
4(3)
Making Transitions Towards Balanced Literacy Instruction
7(4)
Transitions Means Philosophical Movement
7(1)
Transitions Takes Time
8(1)
Transitions Involves Curriculum Integration
8(1)
Transitions Involves Risk Taking
8(1)
The Transitions Model: A Modest Proposal for Change
9(2)
Challenges Facing Preservice Teachers in Making Transitions
11(1)
Disharmony with Past Belief Systems
11(1)
Conflicting Views Among Educators
11(1)
Overcoming Tradition in the Schools
11(1)
Challenges Facing In-Service Teachers
12(1)
Time Commitment
12(1)
Comfort Zones
12(1)
Administrative Risk Taking
13(1)
Concept Applications
13(1)
In the Classroom
13(1)
Recommended Readings
13(1)
Understanding Reading: The Theoretical Roots of Instruction
14(26)
Reading in Today's Society: A Sketch of the Problem
16(1)
The Need for Understanding How Children Learn to Read
17(1)
Reading Theories and Their Relationship to Reading Instruction
18(18)
Behaviorism and a Parts-to-Whole Bottom-Up Reading Process
19(2)
The Relationship of Behaviorism to Subskills or Phonics-First Reading Instruction
21(3)
Cognitivism and the Interactive Reading Process
24(3)
The Relationship of Cognitivism to Skills Reading Instruction
27(3)
Constructivism and the Transactional Reading Model
30(2)
The Relationship of Constructivism to Balanced Literacy Instruction
32(2)
Defining and Refining Instructional Beliefs
34(2)
Transitional Instructional Change Model
36(1)
Summary
36(1)
Concept Applications
37(1)
In the Classroom
37(1)
In the Field
37(1)
Recommended Readings
38(2)
Emergent Literacy: Understanding the Literacy Development of Young Children
40(46)
On Becoming Literate
42(1)
Emergent Literacy
42(1)
Cognitive and Affective Aspects of Language Development
43(8)
Contributions of Piaget
43(4)
Contributions of Vygotsky
47(1)
Contributions of Affect
48(3)
Understanding Language
51(5)
The Semantic Cueing System in Language
51(2)
The Syntactic Cueing System in Language
53(2)
The Visual-Graphophonic Cueing System in Language
55(1)
Pragmatics
55(1)
Oral Language Acquisition
56(2)
Behaviorist Theory
56(1)
Innatist Theory
57(1)
Interactionist Theory
57(1)
Stages of Oral Language Development
58(3)
Parents' Baby Talk: One Way of Getting Attention
58(1)
The First 12 Months: A Time for Hope
58(1)
From 1 to 2: By Leaps and Bounds
59(1)
From 2 to 3: What Does It Mean When I Say No?!
60(1)
From 3 to 4: The Why Years
60(1)
From 4 to 6: Years of Growth and Refinement
61(1)
Development of Reading Behaviors
61(5)
The Mystery of Reading: The Magical Stage
64(1)
``Look, Mom, I'm Reading'': The Self-Concepting Reading Stage
64(1)
Spanning the Gap: The Bridging Stage
65(1)
Blast Off!: The Takeoff Stage
65(1)
I Can Do It by Myself!: The Independent Stage
66(1)
Reaching the Summit: The Skilled Reader
66(1)
Development of Storybook Reading Behaviors
66(2)
Picture-Governed
66(2)
Print-Governed
68(1)
Development of Writing Behaviors
68(10)
Scribbling and Drawing Stage
69(4)
Prephonemic Stage
73(1)
Early Phonemic Stage
73(2)
Letter-Naming Stage
75(1)
Transitional Stage
76(2)
Developing a Sense of Story
78(2)
Story Grammar Elements
79(1)
Understanding Print Concepts and the Language of Instruction
80(2)
Environmental Print Studies
80(1)
Student Perceptions of Reading
81(1)
Understanding Concepts About Print
82(1)
Summary
82(1)
Concept Applications
83(1)
In the Classroom
83(1)
In the Field
83(1)
Recommended Readings
84(2)
Basal Readers: Determining How to Use Basals Effectively
86(42)
Understanding the Basal Reader
88(4)
Anatomy of the Basal Reading Approach
92(8)
The Teacher's Edition
93(1)
The Student's Basal Text
94(2)
The Workbook
96(2)
Assessment
98(1)
Record Keeping
98(2)
Production and Organization of Basal Readers
100(5)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Basal Readers
100(2)
Organization of the Basal Reader
102(3)
Instructional Beliefs and Basal Readers
105(1)
Decoding Basals
105(1)
Literature-Based Basals
105(1)
Adopting and Evaluating Basal Readers From a Transitional Perspective
106(6)
The Process of Basal Reader Adoption
107(1)
Evaluating Basal Readers From a Balanced Reading Perspective
108(4)
Taking Control of the Basal Teacher's Manual
112(8)
Balanced Reading Program
112(2)
Reconciled Reading Lesson
114(1)
Using the Language Experience Approach With Basal Reader Lessons
115(1)
Reciprocal Questioning
116(2)
Directed Reading Thinking Activity
118(2)
Teaching Effective Skill Lessons: From Whole to Parts to Whole
120(3)
Selection and Analysis of a ``Whole'' Text Example: Analyzing a Basal Selection for Skills to Include in a Mini-lesson
120(3)
Helping Students With Special Needs Succeed With Basal Reader Instruction
123(1)
Helping Students With Diverse Cultural or Language Needs Succeed With Basal Readers
124(1)
Summary
125(1)
Concept Applications
125(1)
In the Classroom
125(1)
In the Field
126(1)
Recommended Readings
126(2)
From Basals to Books: Making the Transition
128(46)
Transitions: Implementing Balance in Reading Instruction
130(1)
Transitions in Instructional Beliefs
131(5)
``I Don't Know Enough Yet to Know Where I Stand'' Stance
131(1)
Combative Stance
132(1)
Tentative Stance
132(1)
Responsive Stance
133(1)
Explorative Stance
133(1)
An Off-the-Record Stance
133(1)
A Cautiously Out-in-the-Open Stance
133(1)
An Advocate's Stance
134(2)
Transitions in Using Instructional Materials
136(5)
Basals as Springboards: Mitigating Weaknesses
136(1)
Treating the Basal as an Anthology of Literature---Not a Textbook!
137(1)
Working out of Worksheet Dependency: Toward Reader Response
138(1)
Teaching With Text
139(1)
Oral Reading With Basals and Books: Breaking Away From Round-Robin Reading
139(1)
Components of the Oral Recitation Lesson
139(1)
Asking Comprehension Questions: The Reading Inquisition
140(1)
Transitions in Curriculum Design: Standards Based Instruction
141(10)
Developing a Nonnegotiable Skills List
143(1)
Levels of Integration: Breaking Down Curriculum Barriers
144(1)
Language to Literacy Units With Basals and Books
145(3)
Transitions in Grouping: From Whole-Class (No Grouping) to Flexible Grouping
148(3)
Transitions in Community Involvement: Seeking Support for Change
151(4)
Parent Involvement: Information and Volunteerism
151(2)
Seeking Administrative Support
153(1)
Colleague Collaboration: Establishing Support Groups
154(1)
Transitions in the Classroom Environment
155(2)
Institutional Versus Homelike Classroom Environments
155(1)
Classroom Design Considerations
156(1)
Transitions in Assessment
157(2)
Freedom From the Bondage of Teaching to Texts
157(1)
Portfolios: Movies, Not Snapshots
158(1)
Transitions in Diversity: Monoculture to Multiculture
159(2)
From Caterpillar to Butterfly: The Metamorphosis of Three Transitional Reading Teachers
161(11)
Summary
172(1)
Concept Applications
173(1)
In the Classroom
173(1)
In the Field
173(1)
Recommended Readings
173(1)
Reading Comprehension: Focusing on Instruction
174(48)
Comprehension: Instruction and Assessment
176(1)
Issues in Teaching Reading Comprehension
176(2)
Teaching Versus Testing
176(1)
Basals Don't Teach Reading Comprehension
177(1)
Don't Be Afraid to Teach
177(1)
Theories About Comprehending Text
178(6)
Schema Theory
178(1)
Understanding the Process of Comprehending Text
179(2)
Explaining Comprehension Difficulties
181(2)
Instructional Implications of Schema Theory
183(1)
Generative Learning Theory
184(1)
A Model for Effective Comprehension Instruction
184(1)
Gradual Release of Responsibility Instruction Model
184(1)
Text-Based Comprehension Instruction: Focus on Narrative Structure
185(10)
Narrative Structure: Story Grammars
185(2)
Story Mapping
187(2)
Story Frames
189(4)
Schema Stories
193(1)
Discussion Webs
194(1)
Text-Based Comprehension Instruction: Focus on Expository Structure
195(6)
Expository Structures
195(1)
Pattern Guides
195(2)
Concept-Text-Application
197(4)
Teaching Reading Comprehension: Focus on Context
201(3)
The Cloze Procedure
201(1)
Cohesive Ties
202(2)
Typographic Features
204(1)
Activating Background Knowledge
204(4)
Prereading Plan
204(1)
K-W-L
205(1)
Generating Reciprocal Inferences Procedure (GRIP)
206(2)
Monitoring Comprehension and Fix-Up Strategies
208(2)
Assessing Comprehension of Text: Strategies for Effective Questioning
210(7)
Retellings as Comprehension Assessment
210(1)
Questioning Taxonomies
210(2)
Question-Answer Relationships
212(2)
Asking Prereading Versus Postreading Questions
214(1)
Reciprocal Questioning
214(1)
Wait Time
214(1)
Questions Can Help Students Reconstruct a Model of the Text for Remembering
215(2)
Increasing Student Involvement
217(1)
Helping Students With Special Comprehension Needs
217(1)
Reciprocal Teaching
217(1)
Helping Students With Special Cultural and Language Needs
218(2)
Contextual Diagrams
218(1)
Active Listening to First-and Second-Language Literature
218(2)
Summary
220(1)
Concept Applications
220(1)
In the Classroom
220(1)
In the Field
220(1)
Recommended Readings
221(1)
Acquiring Vocabulary: Words for Reading and Writing
222(38)
Hypotheses About Vocabulary Learning
224(1)
The Instrumental Hypothesis
224(1)
The Aptitude Hypothesis
224(1)
The Knowledge Hypothesis
224(1)
The Access Hypothesis
224(1)
Which Hypothesis Is Correct?
225(1)
Research on Vocabulary Learning
225(1)
Principles for Effective Vocabulary Instruction
226(2)
Which Words Should We Teach?
227(1)
Developing Sight Words
228(6)
Word Banks
229(1)
Key Vocabulary
230(1)
Basal Words
230(1)
Basal Words for Bilingual Classrooms (Spanish)
230(1)
Discovery Words
230(2)
Function (``Four-Letter'') Words
232(2)
Strategies for Building Students' Background Knowledge
234(4)
Gipe's Cluing Technique
234(1)
RIVET
235(1)
Predict-O-Gram
236(1)
Frayer Model
236(1)
Opin
237(1)
Word Cards
237(1)
Structured Overview
238(1)
Strategies for Extending Students' Vocabulary Knowledge
238(11)
Semantic Mapping
238(1)
Making Words
239(1)
Semantic Feature Analysis
239(3)
The Essential Vocabulary Words: Grades 4--6
242(5)
Exclusion Brainstorming
247(1)
Concept Ladder
248(1)
Free-Form Outline
248(1)
Capsule Vocabulary
248(1)
Strategies for Helping Students Acquire New Vocabulary Independently
249(1)
Encouraging Wide Reading
249(8)
Shared Reading and Vocabulary Learning
251(1)
Computer-Assisted Vocabulary Learning
251(1)
Vocabulary Overview
252(1)
Word Maps
252(1)
Studying Word Functions and Changes
253(4)
Assisting Students in Multicultural Settings With Vocabulary Development
257(1)
Summary
258(1)
Concept Applications
258(1)
In the Classroom
258(1)
In the Field
258(1)
Recommended Readings
259(1)
Decoding Skills: Identifying Words in Print
260(44)
Recent Research Concerning Beginning Reading Instruction
262(2)
The Relationship of Decoding Instruction With Reading and Writing Processes
264(2)
Reading Uses ``Segmenting'' and ``Blending''
264(1)
Writing Uses ``Segmenting'' and ``Blending''
265(1)
Implications for Early and Emergent Reading Instruction
265(1)
A Developmental and Instructional Sequence for Phonemic Awareness, Alphabetic Principle, and Phonics
266(1)
Phonemic Awareness
267(5)
An Anticipation Guide on Phonemic Awareness
267(1)
Research on Phonemic Awareness
268(2)
Five Basic Phonemic Awareness Tasks
270(1)
Some Tips for Planning Instruction in Phonemic Awareness
271(1)
Alphabetic Principle
272(4)
An ``Alphabet Books'' Approach
273(3)
Phonics Instruction in Balanced Literacy Classrooms
276(7)
A Phonics Prereading Quiz
276(1)
Phonics: What We Know From Research and Practice
276(2)
Seven Phonics Generalizations
278(2)
Other Important Phonics Terms and Skills
280(1)
Onset and Rime
280(1)
Structural Analysis and Morphemic Clues
281(2)
Putting It All Together: A Sequence of Word-Identification Skills
283(5)
Teaching Skills Effectively Using Mini-lessons: Whole to Parts to Whole Instruction
284(4)
Focusing Attention on Print: Bridging From Memory to Text
288(3)
Recognition
289(1)
Identification and Matching
289(1)
Cloze Techniques
289(1)
Substitution
290(1)
Error Detection
290(1)
Spoonerisms
290(1)
Vowel Substitution
290(1)
Word Rubberbanding
291(1)
Teaching Skills Through Raps, Songs, and Chants
291(4)
Using the Writing Process to Further Enhance Word-Identification Skills
295(2)
``Temporary'' Spellings
295(1)
Editing Sessions
296(1)
Helping Students With Special Needs Develop Word-Identification Strategies
297(5)
Writing as a Tool to Develop Context Clue Awareness
298(1)
Vowel and Consonant Sound Practice
298(1)
Helping SOL (Speakers of Other Languages) Students Develop Phonemic Awareness
299(3)
Summary
302(1)
Concept Applications
302(1)
In the Classroom
302(1)
In the Field
303(1)
Classroom Resources for Teachers
303(1)
Recommended Readings
303(1)
Literacy Environments: Designing Classrooms That Promote Literacy
304(42)
Designing the Classroom Environment
306(1)
Balanced Literacy Classrooms: Understanding the Dynamics of Classroom Environment
306(4)
Providing Literacy Props Affects Children's Literacy-Learning Opportunities
306(1)
The Arrangement of Literacy Props Affects the Quality and Quantity of Literacy Learning in Classrooms
307(1)
Literacy Props Help Focus Human Interaction Toward Acquiring Literacy Behaviors
308(1)
Literacy Props Can Be Used to Create Authentic Literacy-Learning Settings
309(1)
Practical Considerations for Organizing the Classroom Environment
310(11)
Whole-Class Learning and Sharing Area
312(1)
Writing and Publishing Area
312(1)
Silent Reading Area
313(2)
Supported Reading Area
315(1)
Reading Conference Area
316(1)
Thematic Studies or Inquiry-Based Study Area
316(1)
Display Areas
317(3)
Storage Areas
320(1)
Instructional Resources
321(7)
Trade Books
322(1)
Basal Readers
322(1)
Workbooks, Worksheets, and Blackline Masters
323(1)
Leveled Books
323(1)
Decodable Books
324(1)
Computers and Other Information Technologies (ITs) in the Classroom
324(2)
Using Volunteers
326(2)
Instructional Organization: The Question of Grouping
328(12)
Ability Grouping
328(1)
Whole-Class Instruction
329(1)
Literature-Response Groups or Literature Circles
330(1)
Basal Reader Visiting Response Groups
331(1)
Cooperative Learning Groups
332(1)
Guided Reading Groups: Dynamic Homogeneous Grouping
333(3)
Needs Groups
336(2)
Flexible Groups
338(1)
Flexible Basal Reader Groups: Large-Group Lesson/Small-Group Follow-Up
339(1)
Adapting the Environment to Assist Children With Special Needs
340(1)
Adapting the Environment to Assist Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Students
341(1)
Summary
341(2)
Concept Applications
343(1)
In the Classroom
343(1)
In the Field
343(1)
Recommended Readings
344(2)
Assessment: Determining Students' Progress in Literacy
346(54)
Principles of Classroom Assessment
348(2)
Traditional Reading Assessment
350(5)
Informal Reading Inventories
351(1)
Group Reading Tests
352(1)
Individual Diagnostic Reading Tests
352(1)
Other Reading-Related Tests
353(1)
Problems With Many Traditional Reading Tests
354(1)
Balanced Literacy Assessment
355(4)
Portfolio Assessment Schemes: An Approach for Collecting Information
356(1)
Kid Watching: Classroom Observations of Children and Reading
357(1)
Literacy Developmental Milestones
358(1)
Methods for Assessing Reading Development
359(17)
The Burke Reading Interview
359(1)
Interest Inventory
360(1)
Concepts About Print
360(1)
Alphabet Knowledge (Early Readers)
361(1)
Additional Observation Checklists and Scales
361(1)
Fluency Evaluation
362(2)
Reading Logs
364(1)
Running Records
365(2)
Retellings
367(2)
Story Maps
369(1)
Teacher-Made Cloze Tests
370(1)
Questioning
371(1)
Family Surveys of Reading Habits
371(1)
Evaluating Your Program: Assessing the ``Big Picture''
371(2)
Evaluating the Classroom Environment
373(1)
Self-Rating Scales
373(1)
Additional Suggestions for Developing Reading Portfolios
373(3)
Getting Organized: Profiling Your Class
376(6)
Two Documents Needed for Profiling
376(6)
Reporting Progress to Families: What About Grades?
382(6)
Reading Logs
384(1)
Running Records
384(1)
Retellings
385(1)
Literature-Response Projects
385(2)
Cloze Tests
387(1)
Questioning
387(1)
Evaluation Forms
387(1)
Fluency Measures
387(1)
Potential Pitfalls in Using Portfolios
388(1)
Overcommitment (by Teachers) to Daily Entries
388(1)
Spending Too Much Time Managing Portfolios
389(1)
Too Many Contributions by Students
389(1)
Other Issues in Reading Assessment
389(5)
The Notion of Skill Mastery
389(1)
The Need for a Variety of Contexts and Literary Forms
390(1)
Power Tests Versus Timed Tests
390(1)
Norm-Referenced Tests Versus State-Developed Tests
391(1)
``Authentic Grading''
391(1)
Assessing Affective and Conative Factors in Reading
392(2)
Summary
394(1)
Concept Applications
395(1)
In the Classroom
395(1)
In the Field
395(1)
Recommended Readings and Assessment Instruments
396(4)
PART II: READING AND WRITING DEVELOPMENT: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER
The Early Years: Reading and Writing in Grades K---2
400(70)
A Balanced Literacy Program: Reading TO, WITH, and BY Young Children
402(1)
Reading TO Children
402(3)
Reading Aloud
402(1)
Small-Group and One-to-One Reading
403(2)
Reading WITH Children
405(13)
Shared Book Experience
405(2)
Shared Musical Reading Experience
407(1)
Supported Reading: Read-Along Cassettes and Take-Home Books
408(1)
Guided Reading
409(3)
Language Experience
412(6)
Reading BY Children
418(3)
Sustained Silent Reading, or Drop Everything and Read
418(2)
Reader's Theater and Dramatizations
420(1)
The School Library
421(1)
Balanced Literacy Programs: Writing TO and FOR, WITH, and BY Young Children
421(1)
Writing TO and FOR Children
422(2)
Dialogue Journals
422(1)
Message Board
422(1)
Language Experience Approach
422(2)
Writing WITH Children
424(5)
Interactive Writing
424(3)
Traveling Tales
427(2)
Writing BY Children
429(5)
Classroom Post Office for Letter Writting
429(1)
Wordless Picture Books
429(4)
Pocketbooks
433(1)
Reading Response Logs and Journals
433(1)
Establishing Daily Reading and Writing Routines for Young Children
434(6)
Tune-In
436(1)
Old Favorites
436(1)
Learning About Language
437(1)
New Story
438(1)
Independent Output Activities
439(1)
Sharing Time
439(1)
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Young Children to Read and Write
440(1)
Learning About Words
441(7)
Environmental Print
441(1)
Learning the Alphabetic Principle
441(2)
Acquiring Phonemic Awareness
443(1)
Developmental Phonics for Early or Emergent Readers
444(4)
Helping Young Children Develop a Sense of Story
448(1)
Picture Schema Stories
448(1)
Developing Comprehension With Young Children
448(8)
Picture Story Frames
448(1)
Literature Webbing With Predictable Books
449(2)
Directed Listening Thinking Activity
451(1)
Story Retellings
452(4)
Young Children Responding to Literature
456(5)
Sketch to Stretch
458(1)
Posters
459(2)
Character Mobiles
461(1)
Developing Fluency: Young Children Rereading
461(2)
Radio Reading
461(1)
Repeated Readings
462(1)
Themed, Project, or Inquiry-Based Instruction With Young Children
463(2)
Assisting Young Readers With Special Needs
465(1)
Reading Recovery
465(1)
Helping Students With Special Cultural and Language Needs Succeed in the Early Years
466(1)
Summary
467(1)
Concept Applications
467(1)
In the Classroom
467(1)
In the Field
467(1)
Recommended Readings
468(2)
The Elementary Years: Reading and Writing in Grades 3--5
470(56)
Balanced Literacy Instruction in Grades 3 Through 5
472(2)
Keeping Our ``Balance''
472(1)
Literacy ``To, With, and By''
472(1)
The Role of Basal Readers
472(1)
The Reading-Writing connection
473(1)
Literature-Based Reading Instruction
474(30)
What Kinds of Books Do Students Enjoy Reading?
475(1)
Core Book Units
475(3)
Individualized Reading
478(1)
Using a Themed Literature Units Approach
478(3)
Teaching Themed Literature Units: The Nuts and Bolts
481(2)
Themed Literature Unit Time Line: An Example
483(12)
Evaluating Themed Literature Units
495(1)
The Reading Workshop: Organizing for Instruction
496(8)
Developing Reading Fluency as Part of Literature-Based Reading Instruction
504(3)
Strategies for Improving Fluency
505(2)
The Writing Process: Making Authors of Readers
507(11)
Understanding the Writing Process
507(1)
The Prewriting Stage
507(3)
The Drafting Stage
510(1)
Revising and Editing
511(2)
Publishing
513(1)
Using the Writing Workshop: Organizing for Instruction
513(4)
Classroom Computers and Writing Development
517(1)
Assisting Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students
518(5)
Environmental Print
519(1)
Sentence Strips
519(1)
Active Listening
520(1)
Personal Dictionaries
521(1)
Helping LEP Students With Content Area Texts
521(2)
Summary
523(1)
Concept Applications
524(1)
In the Classroom
524(1)
In the Field
524(1)
Recommended Readings
524(2)
Middle School: Reading and Writing in Grades 6---8
526(40)
Helping Students Succeed With Content Reading Materials
528(1)
Why Content Reading Is So Challenging for Some Students: The Nature of Expository Texts
528(7)
Specialized Vocabulary and Concepts
528(3)
Increased Concept Load
531(1)
Readability Considerations
531(3)
Unique Writing Patterns
534(1)
Preparing to Teach: Analyzing Readings and Creating Study Aids
535(13)
Performing a Content Analysis
535(1)
Constructing Learning Tools
536(6)
Vocabulary Development Activities
542(3)
Choosing High-Interest Reading Materials
545(3)
Proven Study Strategies: Helping Students Help Themselves
548(6)
Efficient (``Speed Reading'') Study Strategies
548(3)
Comprehension Monitoring (Metacognition)
551(1)
Writing to Deepen Learning: Having Students Create Their Own Expository Texts
552(2)
Reading Across the Curriculum: Themed Studies
554(5)
Guidelines for Conducting Themed Studies
554(5)
Tactics for Middle Schoolers Having Learning Problems
559(4)
Comprehension ``Strategy Families''
560(1)
Fluency Strategies: Improving Reading Speed
561(1)
Commercial Programs for Low-Performing Readers
562(1)
Summary
563(1)
Content Applications
563(1)
In the Classroom
563(1)
In the Field
563(1)
Recommended Readings
564(2)
Appendix A: Balanced Literacy Resources for Teachers 566(14)
Appendix B: Selected Resources for Teachers 580(6)
Appendix C: Literacy Learning: Milestones for Grades K-3 586(5)
Appendix D: Blank Miscue Grid 591(3)
References 594(44)
Name Index 638(6)
Subject Index 644


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