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Texas : The Lone Star State,9780131835504

Texas : The Lone Star State

by ; ; ;
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780131835504

ISBN10:
0131835505
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $72.93

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Summary

This is a comprehensive yet accessible survey of Texas historyfrom early times to the present. Written in a narrative style, this book offers a balanced presentation of all time periods and topics of Texas history. From the beginning sections on geography and prehistoric people, to the concluding discussions on the start of the twenty-first century, this book successfully considers each era equally in terms of space and emphasis. For interested history enthusiasts looking for a comprehensive survey of Texas history.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
1. The Country and Its Native Peoples
1(18)
The Land
1(4)
The Rivers
5(3)
Prehistoric Peoples
8(1)
The Native Peoples
9(7)
Bibliography
16(3)
2. Spanish Texas-Exploration and Occupation 1519-1763
19(22)
The Spanish Empire
19(1)
Exploration
20(2)
The Challenge of the French: La Salle
22(1)
The First Missions in East Texas
23(2)
The Return of the Spanish to East Texas
25(4)
Expansion: Nuevo Santander
29(1)
Expansion: On the Coast and in the Hills
29(3)
Life in Spanish Texas: The Missions
32(2)
Political and Military Affairs
34(1)
Life in the Civil Settlements
35(2)
Bibliography
37(4)
3. Spanish Texas-The Last Years-1763-1821
41(14)
Texas after the Spanish Acquisition of Louisiana
41(3)
Spain, Texas, and the United States
44(1)
The First Anglo-Americans in Texas
45(2)
The Beginning of the Mexican Revolution
47(1)
Revolutionary Times in Texas
47(3)
A New Era: The Beginning of Foreign Immigration
50(1)
A New Nation: Mexico
51(1)
The Legacies of Spanish Rule
52(1)
Bibliography
53(2)
4. Mexican Texas
55(20)
The Empire of Mexico
55(1)
The Old Three Hundred
56(2)
The Republic of Mexico
58(1)
A New Colonization Program
59(1)
Expansion of Colonization
60(2)
The Fredonian Rebellion
62(1)
The Law of April 6, 1830
62(2)
Colonization Under the Law of April 6, 1830
64(1)
The People of Mexican Texas
65(2)
Government in Mexican Texas
67(3)
Colonial Institutions
70(2)
Bibliography
72(3)
5. The Prelude to Revolution 1826-1835
75(16)
Early Troubles
75(1)
The Disturbances of 1831 and 1832
76(3)
The Conventions of 1832 and 1833
79(1)
Austin's Journey to Mexico City
80(1)
Santa Anna and the Politics of Mexico (1833-1835)
81(1)
Affairs in Coahuila and Texas (1833-1835)
82(2)
The Crisis of 1835
84(2)
Why Revolution?
86(3)
Bibliography
89(2)
6. The Texas Revolution 1835-1836
91(26)
The Beginning of the Revolution
91(3)
The Consultation
94(2)
The Failure of the Provisional Government
96(1)
The Alamo
97(4)
The Birth of the Republic
101(2)
The War in South Texas
103(2)
Retreat
105(2)
The Battle of San Jacinto
107(2)
After San Jacinto
109(2)
Aid for the Revolution
111(2)
The Texas Navy
113(1)
Bibliography
113(4)
7. The Republic of Texas 1836-1845
117(26)
The Election of 1836
117(1)
Houston and the New Nation (1836-1838)
118(3)
The Young Republic and Foreign Affairs (1836-1838)
121(1)
Lamar's Administration (1838-1841)
122(5)
Foreign Affairs (1838-1841)
127(1)
Houston's Second Administration (1841-1844)
128(1)
Houston and Mexico (1841-1844)
129(2)
Houston and the Quest for Annexation (1842-1844)
131(1)
Population Growth in the Republic
132(1)
Tejano Experiences in the Republic of Texas
133(2)
The Empresario System of the Republic
135(1)
The Advance of the Frontier
136(1)
Annexation Achieved
137(2)
Bibliography
139(4)
8. Early Statehood 1846-1861
143(24)
The Establishment of State Government
143(1)
The War with Mexico
144(3)
The Texas-New Mexico Boundary Controversy
147(3)
Settlement of the Debt of the Republic
150(1)
The Politics of Early Statehood
151(3)
Immigration and Extension of Settlement
154(1)
Tejanos and the Settlement of South and West Texas
155(2)
The Growth of Slavery
157(1)
Opponents of Slavery
158(1)
Exploring West Texas
159(1)
The Indian Frontier
160(2)
Bibliography
162(5)
9. Pioneer Institutions
167(24)
The People
167(2)
Occupations
169(1)
Slavery and the Plantation System
170(3)
Life on the Farms
173(2)
The Towns
175(2)
Transportation
177(2)
Health
179(1)
Amusements
180(1)
Law and Order
181(1)
Education
182(2)
Newspapers, Literature, and Art
184(1)
Religion
185(2)
Bibliography
187(4)
10. Secession and War 1860-1865 191(25)
Prelude to Secession
191(2)
Secession
193(4)
At the Battlefront
197(5)
Supplying Men
202(1)
The State and the Confederacy
203(3)
Critics of the Confederacy
206(2)
Slaves and Slavery During the Civil War
208(1)
Life at Home During the War
209(2)
The Final Days
211(1)
Bibliography
211(5)
11. Restoring Texas to the Union 1865-1874 216(21)
Reconstruction: First Steps
216(1)
Emancipation
217(1)
The Freedmen's Bureau
218(1)
President Johnson's Plan for Reconstruction
219(5)
Radical Reconstruction
224(1)
The Constitution of 1869
225(5)
E.J. Davis and Radical Rule in Texas
230(3)
The Effects of Reconstruction
233(1)
Bibliography
234(3)
12. From Reconstruction to Reform 1874-1890 237(22)
A New Constitution
238(1)
The Constitution of 1876
239(2)
Ratification of the Constitution of 1876
241(1)
The Politics of Conservatism (1874-1890)
242(3)
Public Poverty, Public Debt
245(3)
Law and Order
248(2)
The Public Lands
250(1)
Building the Railroads
251(3)
A Changing Economy
254(2)
Bibliography
256(3)
13. Cultural Conflict on the Frontier 259(28)
The Defeat of the Indians
259(8)
The Buffalo Slaughter
267(1)
The Price of Conquest
268(1)
The Cattle Kingdom
269(5)
The Big Pasture Country
274(3)
Other Livestock: Horses, Sheep, and Goats
277(1)
The People of the Range
278(1)
The Advance of the Farmers
279(4)
Bibliography
283(4)
14. The Populists and Progressives 1890-1910 287(18)
The Growth of Political Discontent
288(3)
James Stephen Hogg and Reform
291(3)
The People's Party
294(2)
The Conservative Resurgence
296(4)
Thomas M. Campbell and Progressive Reform
300(2)
Bibliography
302(3)
15. Life at the Turn of the Century 305(26)
The Galveston Storm of 1900
305(1)
Living and Working in Texas
306(1)
Urban Texas
307(1)
Oil and Industrialization
308(2)
Leisure Activities
310(1)
Public Health
311(1)
Religion
312(1)
Education
313(2)
Women at the Turn of the Century
315(3)
Race and Ethnicity
318(6)
Literature and the Arts
324(2)
Bibliography
326(5)
16. Crusades and Complacency 1910-1930 331(29)
Oscar Branch Colquitt (1911-1915)
331(1)
Prohibition: The Moral Crusade
332(1)
The Birth of Fergusonism (1915-1917)
333(3)
Trouble on the Border
336(2)
Texas in the First World War
338(4)
The Politics of Complacency
342(1)
The Ku Klux Klan: Crusades and Bigotry
343(3)
Dan Moody (1927-1931)
346(2)
The Roaring Twenties-Economic Growth and Prosperity
348(3)
Life in the Roaring Twenties
351(5)
Bibliography
356(4)
17. The Great Depression 1930-1941 360(19)
Hard Times in Texas
360(2)
Depression Politics-Ross Sterling (1931-1933)
362(2)
Fergusionism Returns-Miriam Ferguson (1933-1935)
364(1)
Welfare, Economic Planning, and Reform-The New Deal in Texas
365(1)
Industry, Transportation, and Labor
366(2)
Agriculture in the Depression
368(1)
Conservation and Environmental Concerns
369(1)
Literature and the Arts in the Depression
370(1)
The Politics of Recovery-James Allred (1935-1939)
371(2)
W. Lee O'Daniel (1939-1941)
373(3)
Bibliography
376(3)
18. World War II and After 1941-1962 379(23)
The Politics of Wartime
380(3)
Texas and Texans in the War
383(3)
Postwar Texas-The Jester Years (1947-1949)
386(3)
Shivers, Politics, and Tidelands
389(2)
Scandals and Reform: Politics in the 1950's
391(5)
The Election of 1960 and the Emerging Republican Party
396(3)
Bibliography
399(3)
19. The Politics of an Urban Land 1962-2004 402(25)
The Dynamics of Political Change
402(1)
The 1960's: The Johnson and Connally Years
403(3)
The Struggle for Civil Rights
406(4)
Smith, Sharpstown, and Briscoe
410(2)
Constitutional Revision
412(1)
The Republican Challenge
413(3)
Clements, Richards, and Two-Party Politics
416(3)
George W. Bush-Building the Republican Majority
419(1)
President George W Bush
420(1)
Rick Perry and the Republican Ascendency
421(4)
Bibliography
425(2)
20. Beginning a New Century 427(20)
An Economy in Transition
428(3)
Religion and Education
431(3)
Literature and the Arts
434(4)
A Population in Transition
438(6)
Bibliography
444(3)
Appendix 447(5)
Index 452

Excerpts

Some sixty-three years ago, as the world was moving from depression to war, Professor Richardson completed the first edition ofTexas: The Lone Star State,written as a comprehensive, general history of Texas and intended primarily for use in college history courses. Many years later near the end of the 1960s, Professor Richardson, recognizing the evolutionary character of historical studies and the need to provide new insight and ideas, added two authors, Ernest Wallace and Adrian Anderson, in the preparation of the third and subsequent editions. As we moved into the new millennium, a new author, Cary D. Wintz, joined in the preparation of the eighth and continues with this, the current and ninth edition ofTexas: The Lone Star State.Professor Wintz, whose suggestions influenced the preparation earlier editions, brought to the book his broad and comprehensive knowledge of Texas history and his long experience in the study of specialized areas, some of which were scarcely recognized at the time of the original edition. When Professor Richardson prepared the final draft of his manuscript for the first edition ofTexas: The Lone Star State,he wrote in his preface that his mission was to "provide, as far as the limitations of a single volume will permit, acomplete surveyof the history of Texas." His goal was to present not only the topics affording "adventure, contest, and color" but also "the more prosaic but equally important subjects." In search of balance, he sought to tell the story of "cotton pickers" and "priests and conquerors," of "filibusterers" and "farmers"--a complete story, to the extent possible. In keeping with his purpose, Professor Richardson wrote history in narrative or "storytelling" form. Where circumstances demanded and space permitted, he analyzed and interpreted events and issues, but the essence of his work was the evolution of his story and his effort to present it in an account that was as complete and fair as possible. The events of the years since the first publication ofTexas: The Lone Star Statehave been included in successive editions. And, the discovery of new information has sometimes led to reexamination of past events. More often, however, it is an increased awareness of the contributions and role of minorities, women, and other groups which have been ignored or inadequately recognized in the past that has led to a new, and it is hoped, a more complete and meaningful story. In reexamining the past, many of the old traditions or "myths" have been carefully scrutinized and found lacking in terms of meaning and sensitivity; others have been altered or modified. Such changes are appropriate and necessary to the preservation of a free people. But while old "myths" must be constantly reviewed and examined in order that they may not distort our history, care also must be taken to make sure that new "myths," which inevitably arise, do not likewise mislead us in our understanding of our heritage. New materials have been added to bring the text up-to-date in this edition, and where new scholarship is available, some of the earlier chapters have been revised. Substantial changes will be noted in chapters dealing with the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The story of Texas is presented through the events of the newest century, including the tragedy of September 11, 2001 and the political changes that culminated in the elections of 2002 and the subsequent redistricting struggle. In a few instances, the organization has been changed for the sake of clarity, and, unfortunately, for the sake of space, some material of older editions has been deleted. Considerable care has been taken to add a comprehensive listing of recently published books and articles in the bibliographies at the end of each chapter. In recognition of the increased role of visuals--pictures, graphs, and maps-in the learning of the twenty-first century, we have


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