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Transition Planning for Secondary Students With Disabilities,9780130205728
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Transition Planning for Secondary Students With Disabilities

by ; ; ;
ISBN13:

9780130205728

ISBN10:
0130205729
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

This text is appropriate for courses on secondary special education and transition. This comprehensive text provides broad coverage of transition content ranging from the legislative-policy base to specific transition activities. The resulting integration of policy and practice systematically builds the reader's understanding and provides guidelines of effective transition practice. Cross-categorical case studies and practical examples delineate the role of teachers as part of a transition team and illustrate in a practical manner how to do transition.

Table of Contents

Section I Transition Foundations 1(160)
History and Transition Legislation
2(36)
Robert W. Flexer
Definitions and Essential Elements of Transition
3(5)
IDEA-Mandated Transition Services
3(1)
Division on Career Development and Transition Definition
4(1)
The Essential Elements of Transition
5(2)
A Transition Law Framework
7(1)
Policy and Social Foundations Through the 1960s
8(4)
The Development of Societal Values
8(3)
Legislation of the 1960s
11(1)
Policy Foundation and Legislation of the 1970s
12(7)
Precursors of the Disability Rights Movement
12(2)
Legislation of the 1970s
14(5)
Legislation of the 1980s
19(4)
Special Education and Vocational Education Legislation
20(2)
Employment and Training Programs
22(1)
Rehabilitation and Developmental Disability Legislation
22(1)
Transition-Related Legislation of the 1990s
23(7)
Americans with Disabilities Act
23(2)
Access and Accommodation
25(1)
Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1992 and 1998 and Work Force Investment Act of 1998
26(1)
Goals 2000, School to Work Opportunity Act, and the 1990 and 1998 Carl D. Perkins Act Amendments
27(3)
Idea of 1990 and 1997
30(8)
Idea 1990
30(1)
Idea of 1997
31(1)
Conclusion
32(6)
Transition Models and Best Practices
38(31)
Robert W. Flexer
Rachel K. McMahan
Robert Baer
Early Transition Models
39(3)
Work-Study Programs
39(2)
The Career Education Initiative
41(1)
Models of Transition in the 1980s
42(6)
Will's Bridges Model
42(1)
Halpern's Alternative to the Bridges Model
43(1)
Linkages in Transition Systems
44(1)
Work Preparation Models
45(3)
Emerging Models of the 1990s
48(8)
Quality-of-Life Focus on Transition
48(1)
Kohler's Model
49(2)
Siegel's Model
51(3)
Problems in Defining ``Best Practices'' in Transition
54(2)
Best Practices in Transition
56(12)
Self-Determination
57(2)
Ecological Approaches
59(1)
Individualized Backward Planning
60(1)
Service Coordination
61(1)
Community Experiences
62(2)
Access and Accommodation Technologies and Related Services
64(1)
Supports for Postsecondary Education
65(1)
Family Involvement
66(1)
Systems Change Strategies
67(1)
Conclusion
68(1)
Career Development: Theories for Transition Planning
69(26)
Pamela Luft
Lynn C. Koch
Overview
70(5)
The Relationship of Career Development to Transition Planning
71(2)
Additional Goals of Transition Planning
73(2)
Careers for Individuals with Disabilities
75(1)
Theories of Career Development
76(6)
Structural Theories
79(1)
Developmental Theories
79(1)
Work-Adjustment Theories
80(1)
Krumboltz's Social Learning Theory
81(1)
Models for Applying Career Development Theories to Students with Disabilities
82(7)
Ecological Model of Career Development
83(2)
Framework for Linking Career Theory and Practice
85(4)
The Career Development of Students with Disabilities
89(3)
Conclusion
92(3)
Transition Collaborators
95(25)
Thomas Simmons
Jackie June
Robert W. Flexer
Key Concepts in Transition Collaboration
96(6)
The Interface of Transition Collaboration
97(1)
Transition Disciplines
98(2)
Team Models
100(2)
Transition Roles
102(2)
Transition Coordinator
102(1)
Transition Collaborator Responsibilities
102(2)
School-Based Programs and Services
104(5)
Special Education Teacher
104(3)
Related Service Providers
107(1)
Academic and Technical Content Teachers
107(1)
Administrators
108(1)
Public Sector Support Services Collaborator
109(4)
Federal/State Vocational Rehabilitation Program
110(1)
Long-Term Support Agencies
111(2)
Postschool Education and Training Service Collaborators
113(1)
Case Study of an Interagency Agreement
113(1)
Collaboration and Group Process
114(1)
Stages of Team Development
115(2)
Additional Aspects of Group Dynamics
116(1)
Transition Team Processes
117(1)
Students' Needs, Interests, and Preferences
117(1)
Outcome-Oriented Process
117(1)
Interagency Responsibilities and Linkages
118(1)
Movement from School to Postschool Activities
118(1)
Conclusion
118(2)
Multicultural Competence in Transition Planning Processes
120(41)
Pamela Luft
Overview of Culture
121(5)
Our Diverse Country
121(1)
American Cultural Forces
122(2)
Defining Cultural Competence
124(1)
Multicultural Issues for Transition
124(2)
Cultural Diversity in Special Education
126(6)
Special Education Placement Patterns
126(2)
Institutionalized Cultural Values
128(1)
Cross-Cultural Concerns for Transition Professionals
129(2)
Status Issues of Families
131(1)
The Impact of Cultural Difference on Transition Mandates
132(22)
Contrasting Transition Values
133(4)
Negotiating Multicultural Differences
137(10)
Negotiating Transition Mandates
147(7)
Providing Culturally Competent Transition Planning Services
154(4)
Professional and In-Service Training
156(1)
Strategies for Supporting Minority Parents
157(1)
Comprehensive Cultural Training
157(1)
Conclusion
158(3)
Section II Career and Transition Services 161(142)
Career and Vocational Education
162(35)
Pamela Luft
Lynn C. Koch
Deborah Headman
Patrick O'Connor
Overview
163(3)
Definitions of Career and Vocational Education
163(2)
Historical Influences and Legislative Mandates
165(1)
Career and Vocational Education Programs
166(8)
Career and Vocational Education Models
166(5)
Stages of Career and Vocational Education
171(2)
Foundational Skills and Attitudes
173(1)
Integrating Academic and Career Skills
174(7)
Academic Skill Development
174(2)
Classroom-Based Career Development
176(1)
Community-Based Career Experiences
177(2)
Career Planning Strategies
179(2)
Monitoring Career Development Processes
181(4)
Monitoring the Student
182(1)
Monitoring Potential Work and Living Environments
182(2)
Monitoring Congruence Between the Student and Potential Work and Living Environments
184(1)
Career-Specific Vocational Preparation
185(4)
Labor Market Trends and Forces of Change
186(1)
The Structure of Vocational Education
187(1)
Types of Vocational Programs
187(1)
Interfacing Vocational Education with Transition Planning
188(1)
Initiating a Career: Placement and Linkages
189(3)
Job-Seeking Interventions
189(1)
Community Linkages
190(2)
Maintaining and Advancing in Careers
192(3)
Supported Employment
193(1)
Career Maintenance Clubs
194(1)
Accommodations Planning
194(1)
The Portfolio as a Career Maintenance Strategy
195(1)
Conclusion
195(2)
Transition Assessment and Postschool Outcomes
197(30)
Robert W. Flexer
Pamela Luft
Overview of Transition Assessment
199(7)
Characteristics of Transition Assessment
199(2)
Defining Transition Domains
201(2)
IDEA Requirements
203(2)
Functional Assessments
205(1)
Formal Transition Assessments
206(5)
General Skills Test
207(1)
Current and Future Working Environments
208(1)
Current and Future Living Environments
209(1)
Current and Future Personal-Social Environments
209(1)
Academic Assessment
210(1)
Informal Transition Assessments
211(12)
Student School Records
213(1)
Curriculum-Based Assessment
213(1)
Criterion-Referenced Assessment
214(1)
Portfolio Assessment
214(1)
Surveys and Interviews
215(1)
Situational Assessments
216(4)
Work Samples
220(1)
Behavioral Assessment
220(1)
Appropriate Use of Tests
221(2)
Interdisciplinary Assessment Processes
223(2)
Collaborative Processes
223(1)
Comprehensive Transition Planning
224(1)
Conclusion
225(2)
Curriculum Development and Transition
227(20)
James Krouse
Richard Sabousky
Overview of Curriculum
228(3)
Definition of Curriculum
228(2)
Academic, Vocational, and Functional Curricula
230(1)
Fads in Special Education
231(1)
General Education Curriculum
231(5)
Existing Instructional Systems
231(1)
State Standards and Curriculum
231(5)
Social Skills
236(2)
Functional Skills
238(6)
Functional Curricular Models
239(1)
Major Components of a Functional Curriculum
240(4)
Functional Curriculum and Transition
244(1)
Functional Curriculum Considerations
244(1)
Barriers to Curriculum Development
245(1)
Conclusion
245(2)
Instructional Strategies
247(25)
Bryan G. Cook
Cindy Trevino
Lysandra Cook
Melody Tankersly
Effective Teaching
248(10)
Learning Time
249(1)
Review and Preview
250(1)
Demonstration
251(1)
Practice
251(2)
Accountability and Assessment
253(1)
Behavior
253(3)
Application of Effective Teaching Literature to Students with Disabilities
256(1)
Application of Effective Teaching Literature to Transition Curricula
257(1)
Complementary Instructional Techniques
258(13)
Cooperative Learning
258(3)
Self-Monitoring
261(2)
Community-Based Instruction
263(8)
Conclusion
271(1)
The Role of Technology in Transition Planning
272(31)
Deborah Bauder
Preston Lewis
The Importance of Technology
273(3)
Legislation and Definitions
273(1)
Examples of Assistive Technology
274(2)
Application of Technology
276(5)
Barriers to Implementation of Assistive Technology
281(7)
Lack of Professional Development or Teacher Training
286(1)
Assistive Technology Support Services Not Always School Based
286(1)
Need for Follow-Up Services
287(1)
Inability to Evaluate Assistive Technology before Purchase
287(1)
Lack of Parent Knowledge of Assistive Technology
287(1)
Technology and Transition
288(2)
Technology, Transition, and IDEA Principles
290(4)
Students' Needs, Interests, and Preferences
290(1)
Outcome-Oriented Process
291(1)
Movement from School to Postschool Settings
292(1)
Interagency Responsibilities
293(1)
Role of Technology in Postschool Environments
294(5)
Work Environments
295(2)
Community Environments
297(1)
Recreational and Leisure
297(1)
Travel
298(1)
Home
299(1)
Conclusion
299(4)
Section III Transition Planning 303(112)
Participatory Decision-Making: Innovative Practices That Increase Student Self-Determination
304(29)
James E. Martin
Laura Huber Marshall
Randall L. De Pry
Self-Determination: The Basic Facts
305(6)
The Choice Strand
305(2)
The Goal Setting and Attainment Strand
307(1)
Which Strand?
307(1)
Self-Determination Components
308(2)
The Importance of Self-Determination
310(1)
Federal Laws, Regulations, and State Practice
310(1)
Infusion of Self-Determination into the IEP
311(5)
Establishing Self-Determination as an IEP Need Area
312(3)
Standard-Referenced IEPs
315(1)
Teaching Self-Determination and Creating Participatory Decision-Making Opportunities
316(14)
The ChoiceMaker Series
316(2)
Teaching and Creating Opportunities for Choosing Goals
318(4)
Teaching and Creating Opportunities for Expressing Goals
322(2)
Teaching and Creating Opportunities for Attaining Goals
324(1)
Impact of Take Action Lessons
325(1)
Teaching and Creating Opportunities for Students with Severe Needs
326(4)
Student-Directed Functional Assessment and Behavior Support Planning
330(1)
Traditional Approach
330(1)
Student-Directed Functional Assessment and Behavior Support Planning
330(1)
Opportunity for Participatory Decision Making
331(1)
Conclusion
331(2)
Transition Planning
333(31)
Robert Baer
Transition Planning and the IDEA of 1990 and 1997
334(5)
IDEA Regulations Pertaining to Determining Student Needs, Interests, and Preferences
337(1)
IDEA Regulations Pertaining to Outcome-Oriented Transition Planning
337(1)
IDEA Regulations Pertaining to Developing a Coordinated Set of Activities
337(1)
IDEA Regulations Pertaining to Promoting Student Movement to Postschool Activities
338(1)
Common Myths in Regard to IDEA Transition Policy Implementation
338(1)
Myth One: There Is One Transition Planning Process for All Students
338(1)
Myth Two: Transition Planning Occurs Only in the IEP/Transition Meeting
338(1)
Myth Three: Transition Plans Cover One Year
339(1)
Myth Four: Transition Teams Meet Only Annually
339(1)
Preparing for the Transition Meeting
339(10)
Choosing Transition Planning Processes
339(2)
Time Lines for Transition Planning
341(1)
Forming the Transition Planning Team
341(3)
Transition Assessments
344(3)
Transition Service Options
347(1)
Backward Planning
348(1)
Preparing for Student and Family Led IEP/Transition Meetings
349(1)
Implementing the Transition Plan
349(10)
Writing the Statement of Needed Transition Services into the IEP
349(1)
Assessing Transition Progress Using a Career Portfolio
350(2)
A Case Study on Transition Planning
352(4)
Writing IEP Goals for Transition Services
356(3)
Questions Families Frequently Ask
359(3)
Conclusion
362(2)
Coordinating Transition Services
364(22)
Robert Baer
Phillip Rumrill
Service Coordination: A Brief History
365(2)
Goals of Transition Service Coordination
367(14)
Student-Focused Planning
367(1)
Planning
368(6)
Student Development
374(2)
Family Involvement
376(1)
Collaboration
376(3)
Development of Program Attributes and Structures
379(2)
A Case Study in Transition Service Coordination
381(3)
Conclusion
384(2)
Family Involvement
386(29)
Lisa Turner
History of Family Involvement
389(1)
Parent Involvement in the IEP Process
389(7)
Passive participation
389(1)
Lack of Equal Status in Decision Making
389(1)
Types of Parent Participation/Interaction
390(1)
Lack of IEP Efficacy
390(1)
Minimal Roles in the Planning Process
391(1)
Need for Parent Training
391(1)
Parent Involvement in Transition Planning
392(1)
Parents as Key Component in Transition Planning Process
392(1)
Limited Research Substantiating Parent Involvement
392(1)
Empirically Substantiated Positive Parent Effect on Outcome
393(1)
Empirically Substantiated Parent Involvement as a Recommended Practice
393(1)
Parents' Desire for More Involvement
394(1)
Lack of Information Provided to Parents
394(1)
Students' Perspectives
395(1)
Parent Roles and Responsibilities
396(3)
Parental Expectations
396(1)
Transition Team Membership
396(1)
Transition Planning Roles and Responsibilities
397(1)
Attributes of Parents
397(1)
Family Functions
397(1)
Cultural and Linguistic Differences
398(1)
Strategies for Family Involvement
399(14)
Guidelines for Parent Participation
399(1)
Need for Parent Education/Training
399(2)
Need for Specific Knowledge Regarding Outcome Areas and Service Options
401(1)
Preplanning Opportunities
401(1)
Effective Method to Increase Active Parent Participation
401(1)
Informing Parents Regarding Legal Rights
402(1)
Legislative Guidelines for Parent Involvement in Shared Decision Making
403(1)
Parent as Advocate
404(1)
Professionals as Advocates
405(1)
Social Support Mechanisms
406(1)
School Initiated Training for Parents
406(1)
Provision of Community Experiences
406(1)
Information Regarding Adult Service Programs
407(1)
Parent-to-Parent Support Groups
407(1)
Professional Regard for Parents
408(5)
Conclusion
413(2)
Section IV Postschool and Community Environment 415(126)
Transition to Employment
416(23)
Thomas J. Simmons
Barry Whaley
Four IDEA Principles and Relation to Employment
417(1)
Postschool Employment Agencies
418(7)
Vocational Rehabilitation Agency
419(3)
Developmental Disabilities Agencies
422(1)
Mental Health Agency
423(1)
State Bureau of Employment Services
424(1)
Work Force Investment Act
425(1)
Employment and Employer Involvement, Models and Practices
425(10)
Why Real Jobs?
426(2)
Supported Employment
428(1)
Four Features of Supported Employment
429(6)
Social Welfare, Social Entitlements, and Work Incentives
435(1)
Social Security/Disability Insurance
435(1)
Supplemental Security Insurance
435(1)
Additional Work Incentives
435(1)
Services and Agency Delivery Matrix
436(1)
Conclusion
436(3)
Postsecondary Education and Career Paths
439(35)
Deborah Durham Webster
Greg Clary
Penny L. Griffith
Why Go to College?
440(1)
Secondary and Postsecondary Programs
441(15)
Participation and Outcomes in Postsecondary Programs
441(2)
Types of Postsecondary Programs
443(2)
High School versus Postsecondary Environments
445(6)
Disability Support Services in Postsecondary Settings
451(1)
College Climate
452(4)
Four Essential Elements of Transition
456(4)
Determining Students' Needs and Interests
457(3)
Identifying Goals and Preparing Students for Postsecondary Outcomes
460(8)
Interagency Responsibility and Linkages
464(1)
Promoting Positive Postsecondary Outcomes
464(4)
Enhancing Participation in Postsecondary Education
468(3)
Social Aspects of a Postsecondary Education
468(1)
First-Generation College Students
469(1)
Rural Students
469(1)
Specialized Programs
470(1)
Conclusion
471(3)
Recreation and Leisure in the Community
474(25)
Joyce Strand
Janice Kreiner
Community Participation, Recreation and Leisure
476(3)
Transition Needs
476(1)
Health and Wellness
477(1)
Community-Based Programs
478(1)
Essential Elements of Transition
479(8)
Students Needs, Interests, and Preferences
480(1)
Outcome-Oriented Process
481(3)
Interagency Responsibility or Linkages
484(2)
Movement from School to Postschool Activities
486(1)
Leisure Program Options
487(2)
Specific Programs
487(2)
Implementation of Leisure Programs
489(6)
Transition Coordination for Recreation and Leisure
489(2)
Roles and Responsibilities
491(2)
Individualized Leisure Planning and Supports
493(2)
Assessment
495(2)
Leisure Assessment Instruments
495(2)
Leisure Skills, Age Appropriateness, and Safety
497(1)
Conclusion
497(2)
My Home: Developing Skills and Supports for Adult Living
499(42)
James A. Knoll
Carolyn Bardwell Wheeler
The Parental Perspective: Life Is More Than a Job
500(1)
The Personal Perspective: Young and Restless
501(2)
Transition to a New Vision
503(1)
From Placements to People
504(6)
Relocation
504(1)
Renovation
505(4)
Revisioning
509(1)
Living in My Own Home
510(9)
Supported Living
511(2)
Current Challenges
513(1)
Access to Supported Living
514(1)
One State's Approach to Supported Living
515(4)
Personal Assistance Services
519(4)
Access to Personal Assistance Services
520(3)
Transition to Interdependent Life as an Adult
523(13)
Vision
524(2)
Skills
526(2)
Resources
528(6)
Supports
534(2)
Conclusion
536(5)
Appendixes 541(30)
A Self-Evaluation Strategies to Assist in Examining Cultural Beliefs and Multicultural Compentence
542(1)
B Relationships with Minority Families
543(1)
C Life-Centered Career Education Transition Model and Competencies
544(4)
D Glossary of Terms Commonly Used in Transition Planning
548(7)
E Sample Blanket Release of Information and Member Agreement
555(4)
F Self-Survey of Transition Practices
559(12)
References 571(34)
Name Index 605(9)
Subject Index 614


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