9780268044510

Understanding Dante

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780268044510

  • ISBN10:

    0268044511

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-02-25
  • Publisher: Univ of Notre Dame Pr
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $39.00 Save up to $1.17
  • Buy New
    $37.83
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 7-10 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

"DANTE AND SHAKESPEARE DIVIDE the modern world between them; there is no third." Understanding Dante attempts to explain and justify T. S. Eliot's bold claim. John Scott offers readers at all levels a critical overview of Dante's writings: five chapters deal with his New Life of love and poetry (Vita Nova), the Banquet of knowledge (Convivio), his Latin treatise on language and poetics (De Vulgari Eloquentia), Italian lyrics (Rime), and his blueprint for world government (Monarchia). The next five chapters concentrate on Dante's masterpiece, the Comedy. its structure, Dante's worldview (still relevant today), and the Comedy examined as a poem. Much has been written on Dante's moral, political, and religious ideas; important as these are, however, such discussions are perforce limited. It is above all as a work of poetry that the Divine Comedy maintains its appeal to readers of all backgrounds and beliefs. Firmly grounded in the latest advances of Dante scholarship, Understanding Dante offers an original and uniquely detailed, global analysis of Dante as poet of

Table of Contents

About the Series xiii
Preface xv
Electronic Resources xix
Editions of Dante's Works xxi
Abbreviations xxv
Chronology, 1215--1321 xxvii
List of Illustrations
xxxi
Dante's New Life: Vita Nova
1(1)
Beatrice
1(1)
The prose ``commentary'' to the poems selected
2(1)
Beatrice's revelations
3(1)
First sonnet
4(1)
``Screen'' ladies
5(1)
The end of the first section
6(1)
Beatrice denies her greeting
7(2)
The second section
9(1)
The core discovery
10(3)
Sweet new style
13(1)
Love and the noble heart
14(1)
The death of Folco Portinari
14(1)
Premonition of Beatrice's death
15(1)
Beatrice's earthly apotheosis
16(1)
Personification allegory and vernacular love poetry
17(2)
Praise of Beatrice
19(1)
The unfinished poem and Beatrice's death
20(1)
Beatrice and the number nine
21(3)
Dante's sorrow
24(1)
Anniversary poem
25(1)
A ``noble lady'' (donna gentile)
26(1)
Eastertide, 1292
27(1)
A visionary ending
27(2)
Conclusion
29(2)
Texts and translations
31(1)
Other readings
31
Language and the craft of literature: De vulgari eloquentia
1(62)
The vernacular versus Latin (grammar)
35(1)
Dante and the Modistae
36(1)
Language, the hallmark of the human race
37(2)
Babel and its aftermath
39(2)
The mutability of language: ``Grammar'' as an artificial remedy
41(1)
The regional languages of Italy
42(2)
The illustrious vernacular
44(1)
Book 2
45(1)
Who may use the illustrious vernacular, and for which subjects?
46(1)
The canzone as poetic vehicle for the illustrious vernacular
46(1)
The canzone
47(1)
The noblest style
48(3)
Lexis
51(1)
The structure of the canzone
52(4)
Place of composition
56(1)
The work in general
57(1)
Critical fortunes
58(1)
Conclusion
59(1)
Texts and translations
60(1)
Other readings
61(2)
Dante's lyric poetry: Rime
63(44)
Early influences
64(5)
The mature poet's ``purist'' phase
69(2)
Poetry and philosophy
71(5)
Voi che 'ntendendo il terzo del movete (lxxix: 59)
71(1)
Amor che ne la mente mi ragiona (lxxxi: 61)
72(2)
Le dolci rime d'amor ch'i' solia (lxxxii: 69) and Poscia ch' Amor del tutto m'ha lasciato (lxxxiii: 70)
74(2)
The petrose poems (c--ciii: 77--80)
76(13)
Io son venuto al punto de la rota (c: 77)
77(3)
Al poco giorno e al gran cerchio d'ombra (ci: 78)
80(3)
Amor, tu vedi ben che questa donna (cii: 79)
83(2)
Cosi nel mio parlar voglio esser aspro (ciii: 80)
85(4)
Tre donne intorno al cor mi son venute (civ: 81)
89(4)
Sonnets exchanged with Cino (xciv--xcvii, cx--cxv: 84a--88a)
93(3)
Amor, da che convien pur ch'io mi doglia (cxvi: 89)
96(2)
Doglia mi reca ne lo core ardire (cvi: 83)
98(2)
Se vedi li occhi miei di pianger vaghi (cv: 82)
100(2)
Conclusion: Themes, influences, and forms
102(3)
Texts and translations
105(1)
Other readings
105(2)
Dante's Banquet of knowledge: Convivio
107(36)
Aristotle
108(1)
Philosophy
109(1)
Dante's passionate defense of Italian
109(3)
Book 2 (allegory and cosmology)
112(12)
Allegory
112(3)
The literal sense of Voi che 'ntendendo
115(1)
Astronomy and angels
116(3)
Beatrice and the soul's immortality
119(1)
The Consolation of Philosophy
120(2)
The universe of knowledge and the pre-eminence of ethics
122(2)
Book 3: A hymn of love to philosophical wisdom
124(5)
Dante's orthodoxy
126(3)
Book 4: Philosophy, society, and politics
129(10)
Rome and her universal empire
129(3)
The nature of nobility
132(1)
Second part of book 4
133(2)
Differences between book 4 and books 1--3
135(1)
The four ages of man
136(3)
Conclusion
139(2)
Texts and translations
141(1)
Other readings
142(1)
Dante's vision of world empire and peace: Monarchia
143(24)
Date of composition
143(1)
Purpose of the work
144(1)
Book 1: Is the empire necessary?
145(5)
Human society's need for peace
147(1)
Structure of book 1
148(1)
Justice and the empire
149(1)
Book 2
150(5)
Rome acquired empire in conformity with God's will
151(1)
Vergil's role
151(1)
Miracles and Roman heroes
152(2)
Christ and the empire
154(1)
Book 3
155(10)
Structure of book 3
157(1)
Sun and moon analogy
157(1)
Biblical precedents
158(2)
Constantine's ``Donation'' and historical precedents
160(2)
Dante's solution
162(3)
Texts and translations
165(1)
Other readings
166(1)
The Comedy, prolegomena: The prologue scene (Inferno 1--2)
167(24)
The poem's fictional chronology and date of composition
167(4)
The poem's title: Why ``comedy''?
171(2)
The Prologue: Inferno 1--2
173(2)
The poem's ternary structure
175(1)
Allegory
176(1)
The three beasts of canto I
177(1)
Virgil, the pilgrim's guide through both hell and purgatory
178(3)
Beatrice and Bernard
181(1)
Biblical and Vergilian elements and motifs
182(2)
Archetypal images: Forest/desert/sea
184(1)
Exodus
185(2)
Beatrice and grace
187(3)
Conclusion
190(1)
Dante's other world: Moral order
191(22)
The moral order of Inferno
191(4)
The moral order of Purgatorio
195(3)
The ``law'' of contrapasso in hell and purgatory
198(3)
Contrapasso in hell
198(1)
Contrapasso in Purgatorio
199(2)
The moral order of Paradiso
201(7)
The poet's personal evaluation of sins
208(5)
Dante's other world: Topography and demography
213(18)
Topography of the Comedy
214(1)
Hell
215(3)
Purgatory
218(3)
Paradise
221(4)
The poem's demography
225(1)
Classification of the poem's dramatis personae
226(5)
Contemporary figures
227(1)
Biblical and classical figures
228(1)
Historical figures
228(3)
Dante and classical antiquity
231(30)
Aristotle
231(2)
Vergil/Virgil
233(1)
Virgil, the guide
234(2)
Virgil and the pilgrim
236(1)
Vergilian echoes in the Comedy
237(2)
Virgil's tragic flaw
239(2)
Ovid
241(6)
Lucan
247(1)
Cato, guardian of purgatory
247(1)
Cato, the suicide
247(1)
Cato's opposition to Caesar
248(1)
Cato the pagan
249(2)
Statius
251(1)
Capaneus
252(2)
Ulysses
254(7)
Ulysses/Aeneas
255(1)
Ulysses/Cato
256(1)
Ulysses/Moses and Solomon
257(1)
Ulysses/Dante
258(3)
The poet of the Comedy
261(48)
Versification
262(2)
The lexis of the Comedy
264(29)
Latinisms
266(1)
Dialects
267(1)
Gallicisms and Provencalisms
268(1)
Neologisms
269(1)
Rhyme
269(2)
Rhymes in the Comedy
271(2)
Syntax and terzina unit (tercet)
273(2)
Enjambment
275(2)
Syntax, alliteration, and chiasmus
277(1)
Reduplicatio and anaphora
278(2)
Imagery and figures of speech
280(1)
Metonymy and metaphor
280(6)
Simile
286(7)
The voyage of the Argonauts
293(2)
Dante the prophet
295(2)
Imagery in Paradiso
297(2)
Appendix: The Comedy and the Bible
299(10)
Biblical citations
300(1)
Modified citations of the Bible and liturgy
301(1)
The Bible and Dante's prophetic mode
302(3)
Sermo humilis
305(4)
Dante and his contemporary world
309(28)
Emergence of Florence as a republic
310(1)
Frederick II and the papacy
310(1)
Guelfs and Ghibellines
311(1)
Regime of the primo popolo (1250--60)
312(1)
The rout at Montaperti (1260)
312(1)
The triumph of Guelf Florence
313(1)
Florence in Dante's time (1265--1302)
314(1)
The priorate
315(1)
The Ordinamenti di giustizia (1293)
316(1)
Dante's political career
316(1)
Pope Celestine V (1294)
317(1)
Pope Boniface VIII (1294--1303)
317(1)
Dante elected prior (1300)
318(1)
Exile (1302--21)
319(1)
Papal opposition to the empire
320(1)
Emperor Henry VII (1308--13)
321(1)
The world deprived of both ``suns''
322(1)
The poet's condemnation of Florence
323(5)
Dante and the Church
328(1)
Evangelical poverty
328(3)
Beatrice vs. theologians and unworthy preachers
331(1)
Church corruption and renewal
331(1)
Dante's orthodoxy
332(2)
Dante's political vision in the Comedy
334(3)
Dante's Latin epistles, Questio de aqua et terra, and eclogues
337(16)
The Latin epistles
337(11)
Epistle 1
338(1)
Epistle 2
338(1)
Epistle 3
338(1)
Epistle 4
339(1)
Epistle 5
340(1)
Epistle 6
341(1)
Epistle 7
342(1)
Epistle 8--10
343(1)
Epistle 11
343(1)
Epistle 12
344(1)
Epistle 13
345(3)
Questio de aqua et terra
348(2)
The eclogues
350(3)
Dante's First Eclogue
351(1)
Del Virgilio's reply and Dante's Second Eclogue
351(2)
Glossary 353(4)
Notes 357(54)
Works Cited 411(24)
Index of Names and Notable Matters 435(16)
Index of Passages from Dante's Works 451

Rewards Program

Write a Review