9780415234719

William Shakespeare's King Lear: A Routledge Study Guide and Sourcebook

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  • ISBN13:

    9780415234719

  • ISBN10:

    0415234719

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2003-07-28
  • Publisher: Routledge
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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

This Sourcebook discusses and examinesKing Learwithin its literary and cultural contexts, bringing together material on: contemporary documents surroundingKing Lear; performance history; early critical reception from major critics; twentieth-century criticism and key passages. All documents are discussed and explained. The volume also offers carefully annotated key passages from the novel itself and concludes with a list of recommended editions and further reading, to allow readers to pursue their study in the areas that interest them most.

Author Biography

Grace Ioppolo has taught at UCLA, UC Berkeley, the American University and the Shakespeare Institute and is currently based at the University of Reading, UK

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
ix
Series Editor's Preface x
Acknowledgements xi
Introduction 1(8)
I: Contexts
Contextual Overview
9(6)
General Note
14(1)
Chronology
15(4)
Sources of King Lear
19(26)
Primary Sources
19(13)
From Geoffrey of Monmouth, Historia Regum Britanniae (c. 1135)
19(4)
From Raphael Holinshed, The Historie of England (1587)
23(2)
From Anonymous, The True Chronicle Historie of King Leir and his three daughters (1605)
25(7)
Secondary Sources
32(13)
From John Higgins, The First Parte of the Mirour for Magistrates (1574)
32(4)
From Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene (1596)
36(2)
From Sir Philip Sidney, The Countesse of Pembroke's Arcadia (1590)
38(2)
From Samuel Harsnett, A Declaration of Egregious Popish Impostures (1603)
40(1)
From James I, The True Law of Free Monarchies (1598)
40(1)
From James I, Basilikon Doron (1603)
41(4)
2: Interpretations
Critical History
45(3)
Early Critical Reception
48(7)
From Charles Gildon, `Remarks on the Plays of Shakespear' (1710)
48(1)
From Lewis Theobald, Notes on King Lear (1733)
48(1)
From Samuel Johnson, Notes on King Lear (1765)
49(1)
From Charles Lamb, `On the Tragedies of Shakespeare' (1810)
50(1)
From William Hazlitt, `Characters of Shakespear's Plays: King Lear' (1817)
51(2)
From Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Records of his Lecture on King Lear (1819)
53(1)
John Keats, `On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again' (1818)
53(2)
Modern Criticism
55(12)
From A. C. Bradley, Shakespearean Tragedy: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear and Macbeth (1904)
55(1)
From Jan Kott, Shakespeare Our Contemporary (1967)
56(2)
From Peter Brook, The Empty Space (1968)
58(1)
From R. A. Foakes, Hamlet versus Lear: Cultural Politics and Shakespeare's Art (1993)
59(1)
From Kathleen McLuskie, `The Patriarchal Bard' (1985)
60(2)
From Coppelia Kahn, `The Absent Mother in King Lear' (1986)
62(2)
From Michael Warren, `General Introduction', William Shakespeare: The Complete King Lear 1608-1623 (1989)
64(1)
From Terence Hawkes, William Shakespeare: King Lear (1995)
65(2)
The Work in Performance
67(28)
King Lear on Stage
67(3)
King Lear on Screen
70(5)
1681--1834: Tate's King Lear in Performance
75(4)
From Nahum Tate, The History of King Lear (1681)
75(1)
From Thomas Davies, Dramatic Miscellanies (1784)
76(1)
From Elizabeth Inchbald, Comments on King Lear; a Tragedy in Five Acts (1807)
77(1)
From George Daniel, King Lear: A Tragedy in Five Acts, by William Shakespeare (1830)
78(1)
The Nineteenth Century: The Return of Shakespeare's King Lear to the Stage
79(2)
From [William] Macready's Reminiscences, and Selections from his Diaries and Letters (1876)
79(2)
Henry Irving, Preface to King Lear: A Tragedy in Five Acts (1892)
81(1)
Modern Performance: Traditional and Radical King Lear
81(14)
From Harley Granville-Barker, Prefaces to Shakespeare (1927)
81(1)
From John Gielgud, An Actor and His Time (1981)
82(2)
From Ivor Brown, `The Old Vic King Lear' (1946)
84(1)
From Richard Eyre and Nicholas Wright, Changing Stages: A View of British Theatre in the Twentieth Century (2000)
85(1)
From Dennis Kennedy, `King Lear and the Theatre' (1976)
85(3)
From Grigori Kozintsev, King Lear: The Space of Tragedy. The Diary of a Film Director (1973)
88(1)
From Edward Bond, Lear (1971)
89(1)
From Antony Sher, Beside Myself: An Autobiography (2001)
90(2)
From Alastair Macaulay, Review of the Royal National Theatre's production of King Lear (1997)
92(3)
3: Key Passages
Introduction
95(7)
Note on the Text
95(1)
Note on the Key Passages
96(1)
Synopsis of the Play
96(2)
List of Key Passages
98(4)
Key Passages
102(84)
Act 1, Scene 1: Lear tests the love of his daughters
102(3)
Act 1, Scene 1: Lear tests Cordelia
105(5)
Act 1, Scene 1: Lear bargains with Cordelia's suitors
110(3)
Act 1, Scene 1: Cordelia confronts Goneril and Regan
113(2)
Act 1, Scene 2: Edmund deceives Gloucester
115(4)
Act 1, Scene 2: Edmund deceives Edgar
119(2)
Act 1, Scene 4: Lear meets the disguised Kent
121(2)
Act 1, Scene 4: Lear is reunited with the Fool
123(3)
Act 1, Scene 4: Goneril confronts Lear
126(3)
Act 2, Scene 2: Kent insults Oswald and is stocked
129(4)
Act 2, Scene 2: Lear finds Kent in the stocks
133(2)
Act 2, Scene 2: Lear confronts Regan and Cornwall
135(2)
Act 2, Scene 2: Goneril and Regan reject Lear
137(4)
Act 2, Scene 2: Lear goes mad on the heath
141(3)
Act 3, Scene 4: Lear meets Tom of Bedlam
144(3)
Act 3, Scene 6: Lear's mock-trial of Goneril and Regan
147(2)
Act 3, Scene 7: Gloucester's blinding
149(5)
Act 4, Scene 1: Edgar finds his father
154(3)
Act 4, Scene 2: Albany confronts Goneril
157(1)
Act 4, Scene 6: Gloucester and Edgar reach Dover
158(4)
Act 4, Scene 6: Gloucester and Edgar find Lear
162(3)
Act 4, Scene 7: Lear is reunited with Cordelia
165(3)
Act 5, Scene 3: Lear and Cordelia are imprisoned
168(5)
Act 5, Scene 3: The death of Edmund, Goneril, Regan, Cordelia and Lear
173(10)
4: Further Reading
Introduction
183(1)
Recommended Editions of King Lear
183(1)
Recommended Book-length Studies of King Lear
184(2)
General studies of the play
184(1)
On the play in performance
185(1)
On textual matters including authorial revision and printing history
185(1)
Further References 186(3)
Index 189

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