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Working With Clay,9780131963931
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Working With Clay

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131963931

ISBN10:
0131963937
Format:
Spiral Bound
Pub. Date:
12/28/2008
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $110.80

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Summary

Written by a world-renowned ceramist and leading expert in the field, this introductory book describes the initial processes of handbuilding, wheel throwing, plaster mold making, decoration, glaze application and firing techniques in a simple, easy-to-follow narrative. The text offers rich pictorial guidance throughout, both inspiring and instructing students with over 650 color illustrations. It includes a pictorial timeline of ceramic art history; and exposes students to a gallery of ceramic art, from traditional to avant-garde. The third edition is thoroughly updated throughout.

Table of Contents

Preface to the Third Editionp. 8
The Safety Aspectp. 11
The World of Ceramicsp. 13
Introductionp. 13
Clay and Potteryp. 13
History's Influence on the Ceramic Art of Todayp. 14
Functional vs Sculpturalp. 19
Types of Ceramic Waresp. 19
Earthenwarep. 19
Stonewarep. 21
Porcelainp. 23
What is Clay?p. 24
What is a Clay Body?p. 25
Paperclayp. 26
Alternative clays and additionsp. 28
Why Mix Your Own Clay Body?p. 32
Methods of Mixing Clay Bodiesp. 32
Storing the Clayp. 33
How important is fired shrinkage and absorption?p. 33
How to reclaim scrap clayp. 34
What is Glaze?p. 34
Firing Ceramicsp. 35
The Craft of Working with Clay by Handp. 37
Getting Startedp. 37
Tools for Workingp. 39
Wedging Clayp. 39
Building by Hand: Introductionp. 40
Hand-building Techniquesp. 42
Pinching clayp. 42
Coil method, smooth or texturedp. 43
Slab-buildingp. 47
Learning from Techniques used by Indigenous Peoplesp. 54
Methods of formingp. 54
Altering While Buildingp. 54
Changing clay surfacep. 54
Coloring with mineral/ vegetable matterp. 55
Working with Plasterp. 57
How to make a moldp. 58
Casting Slip into Moldsp. 59
Make Your Own Casting Slip or Buy It Ready-madep. 60
How to Mix Plaster and Pour a Formp. 63
Throwing on the Potter's Wheelp. 67
Anyone can Learn to Throw...p. 67
To the Beginnerp. 68
Steps in Throwing on the Potter's Wheelp. 69
Wedgingp. 69
Position at the wheelp. 70
Centeringp. 70
Opening the ballp. 71
Practice These Five Shapesp. 72
Pull up and shape a cylinderp. 72
Half-spherical shapep. 74
Full spherical shapep. 76
Sphere and cylinder combinedp. 78
Low open formp. 78
Other Shapes are Variationsp. 79
Pitcherp. 79
Handlesp. 80
Casserolep. 81
Lids and flangesp. 81
Teapot, coffee potp. 83
Setsp. 84
Closed formp. 84
Do-nutp. 84
Throwing off-the-humpp. 84
Trimming Feetp. 84
Large Forms from the Wheelp. 85
Ceramic Sculpturep. 97
What is Ceramic Sculpture?p. 97
Using an armaturep. 101
Drape in a hammockp. 102
Over-the-hump slab buildingp. 102
Categories of Sculpturep. 103
Sculpture Toolsp. 108
Materialsp. 108
Scalep. 109
Fabrication Techniquesp. 111
Dryingp. 114
Coloringp. 114
Firingp. 115
Firing for a large sculpturep. 115
Finishing Touchesp. 117
Enhancing the Clay Formp. 117
Decorating with Clayp. 118
Texturep. 118
Adding clay to clayp. 119
Engobesp. 121
Engobe techniquesp. 121
Testing and Using Glazesp. 125
Glaze compositionp. 125
Calculating glaze formulasp. 125
Why Make Your Own Glaze?p. 125
Coloring Glazesp. 126
Glaze stains and oxidesp. 126
Basic glaze batches for low, medium, high temperaturesp. 127
Reds, yellows, and orangesp. 128
Amaco glaze testsp. 131
Duncan glaze testsp. 133
Hobby-Carrobia (Germany)
glaze testsp. 134
Mayco glaze testsp. 134
Spectrum glaze testsp. 134
Spectrum Multi-color seriesp. 134
Mixing and Storing Glazesp. 135
Glaze Applicationp. 135
Methodsp. 136
Decorating with Glazep. 137
Sample Commercial Glazesp. 141
Glass is a Ceramic Materialp. 142
Keep recordsp. 145
Experimentationp. 147
Line blendsp. 147
Glaze Improvizationsp. 147
Firing Ceramicsp. 155
Heat Principlesp. 155
Kilnsp. 156
Gas kilnsp. 157
Electric kilnsp. 158
Commercial Ready-made Kilnsp. 158
Paperclay Kilnsp. 161
Why Build Your Own Kiln?p. 162
Firing Principlesp. 163
Temperature Indicatorsp. 163
Guide-posts for temperaturep. 164
Pyrometric Temperature Devicesp. 164
Oxidation and Reduction Atmospheresp. 165
Copper redsp. 166
Iron celadons and tenmokusp. 167
Stacking and Firing Kilnsp. 167
Bisque firingp. 167
Glaze firingp. 168
Alternative Firingsp. 169
Pit firingp. 169
Raku firingp. 169
Salku firingp. 172
Salt firingp. 172
Soda firingp. 173
Wood firingp. 173
Glaze and Firing Problemsp. 177
The Art of Ceramicsp. 179
From Idea to Artp. 179
Pots and platesp. 180
Birds and animalsp. 182
Figures and headsp. 184
Wallsp. 189
Mixed mediap. 194
Sculpturep. 196
Installationsp. 200
The Timeless World History of Ceramic Artp. 206
Compendiump. 214
Suggested Projects for Individual Workp. 214
Decide on general procedurep. 214
Basically functionalp. 214
Basically sculpturalp. 216
Suggested Projects for Beginning Hand-buildingp. 216
Progression of Individual Steps in Throwing Projectsp. 217
Suggested Projects for Clay, Glaze, and Decoration Experimentsp. 218
Body and glaze developmentp. 218
Decorationp. 218
Design standards to keep in mindp. 218
Experimenting with Material Additions to a Base Glazep. 218
Glaze Improvizationsp. 219
Glaze "Line-blend" Testp. 219
Special Low-fire Informationp. 220
Egyptian pastep. 220
Colors for Egyptian pastep. 220
Mosaic cementp. 220
Low-fire engobep. 221
Some Suggestions for Taking Photographs of your Artworkp. 221
Example of a Pottery Studiop. 221
Terms Easily Mixed Upp. 222
Temperature Equivalents of Orton Conesp. 223
Temperature Equivalents of Seger Conesp. 223
Glossaryp. 224
List of Artistsp. 227
Residenciesp. 231
Information Sourcesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 235
Photo Creditsp. 236
Indexp. 237
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.


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