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Writing about Music : An Introductory Guide,9780130406033

Writing about Music : An Introductory Guide

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130406033

ISBN10:
0130406031
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $56.60
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  • Writing about Music : An Introductory Guide
    Writing about Music : An Introductory Guide




Summary

This guidebook provides practical and specific assistance to undergraduate students about writing research papers and other types of projects in the field of music. It also offers practical help in writing effective prose on any topic and ways to improve one's writing style. The Third Edition has been extensively revised and rewritten. The organization of the material has been changed in order to present issues in a more logical order. There are expanded sections on new approaches to musicological research, electronic resources for research, and how to use word processing programs to draft and edit a paper. The section on format issues has been revised and expanded to make the detailed information it offers clearer and more useful. Finally, a new sample student paper has been included in the Appendix, along with discussion questions designed to help students analyze the paper, read more critically, and understand better the process of researching a topic, designing a paper, and arguing a thesis persuasively.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Writing about Music
1(8)
Why We Write about Music
1(1)
The Special Challenges of Writing about Music
2(1)
Inappropriate Ways to Write about Music
3(4)
Musicological Research and Writing
7(2)
Analysis and Research
9(12)
Analysis
9(1)
Questions to Consider
10(3)
Examples of Works and Research Directions
13(8)
Gesualdo: ``Moro, lasso,''
13(1)
Opening Chorus of Cantata No. 80, Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott
14(2)
J. S. Bach
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in C Minor, K. 491, First Movement
16(1)
Mozart
Otello, Act, I, Scene 3
17(1)
Verdi
A Faust Symphony, First Movement
18(1)
Liszt
The Rite of Spring, Opening Sections
19(2)
Stravinsky
Getting Started: Research
21(19)
Choosing a Topic
21(2)
Kinds of Topics
23(1)
What Research Means
24(1)
Gathering Materials
25(1)
Places to Start: Print Resources
26(7)
Library Catalogs
26(1)
Dictionaries and Encyclopedias
26(2)
Histories of Music
28(2)
Biographies
30(1)
Thematic Catalogs
30(1)
Articles
31(1)
Dissertations
31(1)
Scores and Recordings
32(1)
Places to Start: Electronic Resources
33(4)
On-line Library Catalogs
33(1)
Databases on CD-ROM
34(1)
The Internet
35(2)
Evaluating Resources
37(1)
Foreign-Language Resources
38(1)
When to Stop: How Much Research Is Enough?
38(2)
Writing a Research Paper
40(19)
The Outline
40(3)
Topic and Thesis
40(1)
Introduction
41(1)
Body
42(1)
Conclusion
42(1)
Revising the Outline
42(1)
Writing the Draft
43(7)
Musical Examples
44(1)
Diagrams, Graphics, and Tables
45(1)
Footnotes
46(2)
Bibliography
48(2)
Revising and Editing the Draft
50(4)
Computers and Editing
50(1)
Checking Spelling and Grammar
51(1)
The Editing Process
52(2)
Printing
54(1)
Proofreading
54(1)
Keep Your File
55(1)
Plagiarism
55(2)
Conclusion
57(2)
Questions of Format
59(24)
Format for College Papers
59(3)
Paper
60(1)
Page Format
60(1)
Fonts
61(1)
Spacing
61(1)
Justification
61(1)
Page Numbers
62(1)
Format for Quotations
62(3)
Short Quotations
63(1)
Block Quotations
63(1)
Ellipsis and Editorial Additions
64(1)
Bibliography and Footnote Form
65(13)
Books
66(4)
Dissertations
70(1)
Articles in Dictionaries and Encyclopedias
70(2)
Articles in Periodicals
72(1)
Articles in Collections of Essays
73(1)
Scores
73(1)
Sound Recordings
74(1)
Citing Interviews, Correspondence, and E-Mail
75(1)
Citing Electronic Resources
75(3)
Format Issues Related to Writing about Music
78(4)
Stylistic Periods
78(1)
Referring to Musical Works
78(2)
Naming Notes and Keys
80(1)
Foreign Terms
81(1)
Musical Examples
82(1)
Conclusion
82(1)
Other Kinds of Writing Projects
83(19)
The Seminar Presentation
83(5)
Research
84(1)
Organizing the Presentation
84(4)
Tone and Approach
88(1)
Concert Reports
88(3)
Purpose
89(1)
Research
89(1)
Writing the Report
90(1)
Program Notes
91(6)
Purpose
91(1)
Who is the Audience?
91(1)
Research
92(1)
Working within Limits
93(1)
Special Problems
94(2)
Texts and Translations
96(1)
Conclusion
97(1)
Essay Examinations
97(4)
Purpose
97(1)
Preparing for Essay Examinations
98(1)
How to Proceed
98(1)
Common Errors
99(2)
Conclusion
101(1)
Writing Style
102(20)
Some Basic Ideas about Writing
102(2)
Kinds of Prose
104(1)
Tone
105(1)
The Stance of the Writer
106(1)
Referring to Yourself
107(1)
Writing Effective Sentences
108(10)
Word Choice
108(3)
Word Combinations
111(3)
Sentence Structure
114(4)
Effective Paragraphs
118(1)
The Effective Essay
119(2)
Introduction
119(1)
Translations
120(1)
Conclusion
120(1)
Summary
121(1)
Common Writing Problems
122(28)
Errors in Basic Grammar and Writing
122(10)
Incomplete Sentences
122(1)
Run-on Sentences
123(1)
Agreement: Subject and Verb
123(1)
Agreement: Pronoun and Antecedent
124(2)
Proper Cases of Pronouns
126(1)
Relative Pronouns
126(2)
Misplaced Modifiers
128(3)
The Split Infinitive
131(1)
Mixed Metaphors
131(1)
Spelling Issues
132(4)
Using a Dictionary
132(1)
Forming Possessives
133(1)
Plurals of Borrowed Latin and Greek Words
134(1)
Foreign Words
134(1)
Medieval and Renaissance Names
135(1)
Some Troublesome Word Pairs
136(2)
Its and It's
136(1)
Your and You're
136(1)
Whose and Who's
137(1)
Affect and Effect
137(1)
Due to and Because of
137(1)
Discreet and Discrete
137(1)
Fewer and Less
138(1)
Principal and Principle
138(1)
Punctuation
138(6)
The Period
139(1)
The Comma
139(2)
The Semicolon
141(1)
The Colon
142(1)
Quotation Marks
142(1)
The Hyphen
143(1)
The Dash
143(1)
Parentheses
144(1)
Special Problems Involved in Writing about Music
144(5)
Technical Terms
144(3)
Describing Musical Events
147(2)
Summary
149(1)
Conclusion 150(2)
Appendix: Sample Paper 152(15)
Index 167

Excerpts

Since its publication in 1990, this writing guide for undergraduate music majors has proved useful in music departments and schools of music in the United States and Canada. It has been used in academic courses by both music majors and nonmajors. A second edition in 1997 attempted to improve on both the content and the tone of the first edition, and updated the listings of resources useful for research and writing. PURPOSE OF THE THIRD EDITION It is now time to publish a third edition of this guide. The information about resources in the second edition is out of date, particularly in view of the appearance of important new print resources, especially the second edition ofThe New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians,and the proliferation of Web sites useful for research. In recent years, musicological research has continued to flourish in such areas as cultural and gender studies, areas I deal with more thoroughly in the new section about research. In addition, I am a co-author, with Silvia Herzog, of a new text for beginning graduate students in music,Introduction to Research in Music,published by Prentice Hall in 2001. There is, of course, a certain amount of overlap in content between the two books, but also, working on the graduate-level text clarified my thinking on several issues connected with research and writing and led to clearer ways of presenting certain material. Once the necessary changes were made, these new ideas proved useful in this undergraduate guide as well. There is clearly a greater need than ever for a manual like this. Even though all students now use either their own computers or the sophisticated equipment colleges and universities provide for their use, many students still hand in papers that are actually preliminary drafts in desperate need of revision and proofreading. The irony is that today's word-processing equipment makes revising and editing so much easier than it was in the old days when we used typewriters. I have noticed another strange phenomenon since the advent of personal computers. In all my undergraduate classes in recent years, there have been one or two students with a flair for graphics who hand in papers with marvelous illustrations on the title page; unfortunately, that creativity and skill does not always extend to the papers inside. In fairness, I must point out that in every class there are also some students who have finely honed writing skills, who can argue complex ideas clearly and skillfully, and who produce prose that is a pleasure to read. The expansion in today's college population widens tremendously the gap between the best and the worst students in skills such as critical thinking and persuasive writing. Instructors constantly worry about the difficulty of organizing their courses so that they continue to challenge the best students while still making it possible for less-gifted students to succeed. My hope is that this manual will be of use to all undergraduate students. Students who are already skillful writers can use it as a review, and students who somehow entered college without basic writing skills can also learn some useful things from it. In addition, this guide may continue to be useful for new graduate students who have not had a decent writing course in their undergraduate years or for whom English is a second language. Another reason for producing a third edition is that the language is still under assault all around us. We are bombarded daily by imprecise and careless language. On television broadcasts of football games, coaches babble at half time about their hopes for a better second half--"We made too many mental errors in the first half. We're gonna have to suck it up, find some people who can step up and go out there and make something happen!" The words sound resolute, but what exactly do they mean? Newscasters talk about neighborhoods "decimated" by floods or fires, and observe, "Hopefully, t


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