CART

(0) items

Young Children with Special Needs,9780131113404
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Young Children with Special Needs

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131113404

ISBN10:
0131113402
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE-HALL

Related Products


  • Outlines and Highlights for Young Children with Special Needs by Stephen R Hooper, Isbn : 9780131590144
    Outlines and Highlights for Young Children with Special Needs by Stephen R Hooper, Isbn : 9780131590144
  • Young Children with Special Needs
    Young Children with Special Needs
  • Young Children With Special Needs, Pearson eText with Loose-Leaf Version -- Access Card Package
    Young Children With Special Needs, Pearson eText with Loose-Leaf Version -- Access Card Package





Summary

As the only volume in the field to provide in-depth treatment of early childhood special education, this edited book offers broad-based coverage of all aspects of special education for the young from a theoretical-developmental perspective. The authors provide an exceptionally thorough discussion of how children develop and what can go wrong while giving future special education teachers a solid "knowledge-content-applications" approach from which to teach children with special needs from birth to 5 years old. Significant attention is paid to core issues-special education's historical foundations, the growth and development of the discipline, working with families, assessment and intervention, and the use of technology. For future special education teachers.

Table of Contents

PART I Foundations
1 Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs
2(36)
Warren Umansky
A Rationale for Early Childhood Special Education
5(12)
Legislation
5(8)
Empirical Evidence
13(3)
Ethical Considerations
16(1)
The Early Interventionist
17(6)
Teacher Roles
17(2)
Teacher Competencies
19(4)
Young Children with Special Needs and Their Families
23(6)
Who Are Young Children with Special Needs?
23(6)
The Family and the Community
29(3)
Summary
32(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
32(1)
Recommended Resources
32(1)
References
33(5)
2 Developmental Processes and Factors Affecting Development
38(52)
Stephen R. Hooper and Carrie Mills
Definitional Issues and Processes
40(4)
Definition
40(1)
Individual Differences
41(1)
Principles of Development
41(2)
Processes of Development
43(1)
Periods of Development
44(12)
Conception
44(2)
Prenatal Development
46(2)
The Birth Process
48(3)
Neonatal Period
51(1)
Infant Period
52(2)
Toddler Period
54(1)
Preschool Period
55(1)
Factors Affecting Development
56(23)
Maternal Age and Parity
56(1)
Paternal Factors
57(1)
Maternal Nutrition
57(2)
Exposure to Toxins During Pregnancy
59(1)
Substance Use During Pregnancy
60(4)
Maternal Illnesses
64(2)
Maternal Infections
66(1)
Maternal Emotional State
67(1)
Blood Incompatibility
68(1)
Genetic Abnormalities
68(6)
Prematurity and Low Birth Weight
74(3)
Failure to Thrive
77(1)
Child Abuse and Neglect
77(2)
Summary
79(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
79(1)
Recommended Resources
80(1)
References
80(10)
3 Partnerships with Families
90(30)
Zolinda Stoneman and Mary E. Rugg
Family-Centered Values
93(4)
Family Strengths Are Identified and Emphasized
94(1)
Families Are Actively Included in Planning and Decision Making
95(1)
Services and Supports Are Developed for the Whole Family
95(1)
Family Priorities Guide Intervention Goals and Services
96(1)
The Preferred Level of Family Participation Is Respected
96(1)
Family Diversity
97(2)
Changing Family Demographics
97(1)
Serving Families from Different Cultures
97(1)
Families, Poverty, and Early Intervention
98(1)
The Family as a System
99(5)
Parental Roles
100(2)
Marital Roles
102(1)
Sibling Roles
102(1)
The Role of the Child with a Disability
103(1)
The Role of the Extended Family
104(1)
Parent Emotions, Beliefs, and Parent-to-Parent Support
104(1)
Natural Environments as Sources of Everyday Learning Opportunities
105(2)
Skills for Effective Work in Partnership with Families
107(6)
Demonstrating Respect
109(1)
Being Realistic
109(1)
Using Good Listening and Communication Skills
110(1)
Helping the Family Build Natural Support Networks
111(1)
Being Sensitive
111(1)
Reaching Out-Forming Partnerships and Collaborations
112(1)
Being Flexible-Doing Whatever It Takes
113(1)
Summary
113(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
113(1)
Recommended Resources
114(1)
References
114(6)
PART II Principles of Assessment and Intervention
4 Assessment of Young Children: Standards, Stages, and Approaches
120(28)
Rebecca Edmondson Pretzel and Jennifer Hiemenz
Current Standards for the Assessment Process
122(2)
Treatment Utility
123(1)
Social Validity
123(1)
Convergent Assessment
124(1)
Consensual Validity
124(1)
Stages of Assessment
124(9)
Stage 1: Early Identification
124(6)
Stage 2: Comprehensive Evaluation
130(3)
Stage 3: Program Planning and Implementation
133(1)
Stage 4: Program Evaluation
133(1)
Team Approaches and Typologies
133(8)
Team Models
134(1)
Assessment Typologies
135(6)
Considerations for the Assessment of Young Children
141(3)
Selection of Assessment Measures and Methods
141(1)
Situational Considerations
142(1)
Family and Parental Involvement
143(1)
Summary
144(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
144(1)
Recommended Resources
145(1)
References
145(3)
5 Intervention
148(40)
Tina M. Smith and Tashawna Duncan
Defining Intervention
150(1)
Family-Centered Intervention
151(4)
Multiculturalism and Early Intervention
152(2)
Barriers to Effective Family Involvement
154(1)
Program Planning
155(28)
Step 1: Assessment
155(2)
Step 2: The Individualized Service Plan
157(7)
Step 3: Implementation of Intervention
164(15)
Step 4: Evaluation
179(4)
Summary
183(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
184(1)
Recommended Resources
184(1)
References
185(3)
6 Technology for Assessment and Intervention
188(36)
Kathryn Wolff Heller
Types of Technology
191(5)
Medical Technology
191(1)
Technology Productivity Tools
192(1)
Informational Technology
192(1)
Assistive Technology
193(1)
Instructional Technology
194(2)
Assessment Considerations
196(7)
Assistive Technology Assessment Considerations
197(2)
Instructional Technology Assessment
199(4)
Augmentative Communication
203(4)
Means of Access, Storage, and Output
205(1)
Symbol and Vocabulary Selection
206(1)
Augmentative Communication and Assessment
207(1)
Computer Access
207(4)
Accessibility Functions and Keyboard Modifications
208(1)
Alternate Keyboards and Alternate Input
209(1)
Computer Output Options
210(1)
Assessing Computer Access
211(1)
Software for Early Learning
211(5)
Cause-and-Effect Software
212(1)
Language Development Software
212(1)
Software for Readiness and Beginning Academic Skills
213(1)
Software Targeting Multiple Intelligence Areas
214(2)
Play and Technology
216(2)
Adapted Toys
216(1)
Games, Recreational Devices, and Software Programs
217(1)
Providing Environments for Play
217(1)
Summary
218(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
218(1)
Recommended Resources
219(1)
References
219(5)
PART III Developmental Domains
7 Gross Motor Development
224(44)
Carole W. Dennis and Kathleen A. Schlough
Theories of Motor Development
227(4)
Reflex/Hierarchical Model
227(3)
Dynamic Systems Model
230(1)
Stages of Gross Motor Development
231(7)
Birth to Six Months
231(4)
Seven to Twelve Months
235(1)
Twelve to Twenty-four Months
236(1)
Two to Five Years
237(1)
Factors Affecting Gross Motor Development
238(6)
Variations in Early Motor Development
238(1)
Race, Ethnicity, and Culture
239(2)
Prematurity
241(1)
Disorders of Postural Tone
241(2)
Sensory Registration and Processing Disorders
243(1)
Gross Motor Development in Young Children with Special Needs
244(11)
Cerebral Palsy
244(2)
Traumatic Brain Injury and Brain Tumors
246(1)
Spina Bifida (Myelodysplasia)
247(1)
Degenerative Conditions (Neuromuscular Disorders)
248(4)
Spinal Cord Injury and Tumors of the Spinal Cord
252(1)
Down Syndrome
252(1)
Disorders of Motor Coordination
253(1)
Autism
254(1)
Specific Strategies for Gross Motor Assessment
255(2)
Selected Strategies for Intervention
257(3)
Models and Frameworks for Meeting Gross Motor Needs
257(2)
Positioning the Child
259(1)
Postural and Gross Motor Control
259(1)
Assistive Technology for Gross Motor Intervention
260(2)
Summary
262(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
262(1)
Recommended Resources
263(1)
References
263(5)
8 Fine Motor, Oral Motor, and Self-Care Development
268(64)
Jean A. Patz and Carole W. Dennis
Theories of Fine Motor Development
270(1)
Stages of Fine Motor Development
271(4)
Reach
272(1)
Grasp
273(1)
Release
274(1)
Fine Motor Development in Toddlers and Preschoolers
275(4)
Manipulation
275(4)
Factors Affecting Fine Motor Development
279(3)
Fine Motor Development in Young Children with Special Needs
282(6)
Cerebral Palsy
282(1)
Down Syndrome
283(1)
Disorders of Sensory Regulation
284(1)
Autism
284(3)
Disorders of Sensory Discrimination
287(1)
Specific Strategies for Fine Motor Assessment
288(1)
Use of Technology in Fine Motor Assessment and Intervention
289(1)
Selected Strategies for Fine Motor Intervention
290(7)
Positioning the Child
291(1)
Positioning of Objects
292(2)
Fine Motor Materials
294(1)
Prewriting Adaptations
295(1)
Prewriting Programs
295(1)
Scissors Skills
296(1)
Theories of Oral Motor Development
297(1)
Stages of Typical Oral Motor Development
298(3)
Positioning During Meals
298(1)
Sucking
299(1)
Swallowing
299(1)
Munching and Chewing
300(1)
Spoon-Feeding
300(1)
Cup Drinking
300(1)
Factors Affecting Oral Motor Development
301(4)
Positioning
303(1)
Sucking
303(1)
Swallowing
303(1)
Chewing
304(1)
Spoon-Feeding
305(1)
Cup Drinking
305(1)
Oral Motor Development in Young Children with Special Needs
305(2)
Cerebral Palsy
305(1)
Down Syndrome
306(1)
Autism
306(1)
Cleft Lip or Palate
306(1)
Low Vision
306(1)
Myelomeningocele
307(1)
Congenital AIDS
307(1)
Learning Disability
307(1)
Specific Strategies for Oral Motor Assessment
307(1)
Selected Strategies for Oral Motor Intervention
308(7)
Positioning the Child
308(1)
Positioning of the Feeder
309(1)
Sucking
309(1)
Swallowing
310(1)
Chewing
310(1)
Diet Texture
311(1)
Spoon-Feeding
311(1)
Cup Drinking
312(3)
Stages of Typical Self-Care Development
315(4)
Stages of Self-Feeding Development
315(1)
Stages of Dressing Development
316(1)
Stages of Toileting Development
316(3)
Self-Care Development in Young Children With Special Needs
319(2)
Self-Feeding
319(1)
Dressing
320(1)
Toileting
320(1)
Specific Strategies for Self-Care Assessment
321(1)
Selected Assessment Tools That Evaluate Self-Care Skills
321(1)
Use of Technology in Self-Care Assessment and Intervention
322(1)
Use of Technology in Toileting
322(1)
Selected Strategies, for Self-Care Intervention
323(2)
Summary
325(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
326(1)
Recommended Resources
326(1)
References
327(5)
9 Cognitive Development
332(40)
Warren Umansky
The Range of Cognitive Skills
334(1)
Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development
334(5)
Organization of Development
338(1)
Piaget's Stages of Development
339(8)
Sensorimotor Period
339(4)
Preoperational Period
343(4)
Other Theories of Development
347(4)
Vygotsky's Theory
347(1)
Behavioral Theories
348(3)
Relationships Between Developmental and Cognitive Processing Models
351(1)
Factors That Affect Cognitive Development
352(2)
Cognition and the Environment
352(2)
Cognitive Development and the Child with Special Needs
354(6)
Mental Retardation
355(1)
Visual Impairments
356(1)
Hearing Impairments
357(1)
Physical Impairments
358(1)
Autism
359(1)
Facilitating Cognitive Development
360(6)
Focusing on the Process
360(1)
Skills of the Interventionist
361(4)
Structuring the Curriculum
365(1)
Summary
366(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
366(1)
Recommended Resources
366(1)
References
367(5)
10 Communication
372(38)
Susan R. Easterbrooks
Language: A Framework and Definitions
374(5)
Communication
374(1)
Speech
374(1)
Language
374(1)
Form, Content, and Use
375(1)
Phonology
375(2)
Morphology
377(1)
Syntax
378(1)
Semantics
378(1)
Pragmatics
378(1)
Stages of Normal Language Acquisition
379(3)
Prelinguistic and Babbling Stage
379(1)
One-Word Stage
380(1)
Early Word Combinations
381(1)
Multiword Combinations
381(1)
Simple Sentence Structure
381(1)
Theories of Communication Development
382(2)
Behavioral Theory
382(1)
Innatist Theory
383(1)
Cognitive Theory
383(1)
Social Interaction Theory
383(1)
Factors Influencing Communication Development
384(3)
Hearing
384(1)
Vision
385(1)
Intelligence
386(1)
Memory
386(1)
Attention
386(1)
Communication Development in Young Children with Special Needs
387(7)
Mental Retardation
387(1)
Learning Disabilities
388(1)
Behavior Disorders
388(1)
Specific Speech Disorders
389(1)
Specific Language Impairment
390(1)
Hearing Loss
390(1)
Vision Loss
391(1)
Cerebral Palsy
392(1)
Other Health Impairments and Neurological Problems
392(1)
Autism Spectrum Disorder
393(1)
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
393(1)
Children from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds
394(1)
Speech and Language Assessment
394(2)
Assistive Technology and Augmentative and Alternative Communication
396(1)
Issues and Principles of Communication Intervention
397(4)
Collaboration
397(1)
Didactic and Child-Directed Approaches
397(1)
Caregiver-Child Interactions and Naturalistic Environments
398(1)
Influence of Preschool Inclusion on Language Intervention
398(1)
Principles of Intervention
398(3)
Summary
401(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
402(1)
Recommended Resources
402(1)
References
403(7)
11 Social and Emotional Development
410(38)
Joan Lieber and Warren Umansky
Stages of Typical Social and Emotional Development
412(3)
Emotional Development
412(1)
Social Development with Peers
413(2)
Friendship
415(1)
Theories of Social and Emotional Development
415(3)
Attachment Theory
416(1)
Emotional Intelligence
417(1)
Psychosocial Theory
417(1)
Social Learning Theory
418(1)
Factors Affecting Social and Emotional Development
418(4)
Temperament
419(1)
Gender
419(1)
Stress
420(1)
Sibling Relationships
420(1)
Parental Style
421(1)
Social and Emotional Development in Children with Special Needs
422(7)
Children with Autism
422(1)
Children with Developmental Delays
423(1)
Children with Communication Disabilities
423(1)
Children with Sensory Impairments
424(2)
Children with Challenging Behaviors
426(1)
Children with Attention Deficits
427(1)
Children with Physical Impairments
427(1)
Social Acceptance and Rejection
428(1)
Friendship and Children with Disabilities
428(1)
Specific Strategies for Social and Emotional Assessment
429(4)
Issues in Assessment
429(1)
Types of Assessment Instruments
430(3)
Technology in Social and Emotional Assessment and Intervention
433(1)
Intervention Strategies to Promote Social and Emotional Development
434(7)
Family-Focused Interventions
434(1)
Skills of the Caregiver
434(2)
Skills of the Interventionist
436(1)
Child-Focused Interventions
436(1)
The Classroom Setting
436(1)
Strategies to Improve Social Relationships
437(3)
Interventions for Emotional Development
440(1)
Interventions for Challenging Behaviors
440(1)
Summary
441(1)
Review Questions and Discussion Points
441(1)
Recommended Resources
441(1)
References
442(6)
PART IV Epilogue
12 Issues and Directions
448(9)
Stephen R. Hooper and Warren Umansky
Terminology
450(1)
Inclusion
451
Families
450(3)
Cultural Diversity
453(1)
Training
453(1)
Technology
454(1)
Public Policy
455(1)
Keeping Pace
455(1)
To the Future
456(1)
Name Index 457(14)
Subject Index 471

Excerpts

It has been approximately 25 years since the first edition ofYoung Children with Special Needswas published, and there was little history to present about the field at that time. We remarked about that in the preface of the third edition, and now comment on it again in the fourth edition. This remains an important point in that the growth in the field of early childhood special education has been extraordinary. From the first few experimental personnel preparation programs, there have grown dozens--with more contemporary programs evolving at a rapid rate even since the last edition in 1998. From a few demonstration early intervention programs for preschoolers in each state, there have grown thousands of programs, and early intervention is mandatory in every state for eligible children beginning at birth. From a few experimental curricula and homemade materials, there has grown an industry geared to serving the needs of young children with disabilities and their families. This growth has been unprecedented, and it is likely to continue--even in the face of difficult financial times. There has been a true commitment to early childhood special education on the part of state and federal governments, university training programs, and local communities, and this commitment likely will be rewarded with better services and evidence-based interventions for young children with special needs, better trained personnel, more informed and more involved families and communities, and increasingly more child-friendly public policies. In turn, we should gain increased respect for young children with special needs and their families and, ultimately, there should be valuable contributions to our society as a whole from this population. The fourth edition ofYoung Children with Special Needsmaintains a number of similarities with the third edition. This edition continues to be driven by a developmental theoretical perspective. We have built that perspective into most of the chapters in the latter half of the text, and all of the contributors have done an exceptional job in perpetuating this developmental perspective. We also have continued to put emphasis on some key content areas in early childhood special education such as historical foundations, basic growth and development, families, assessment and intervention, and technology. At the center of successful early intervention are competent professionals who are knowledgeable about children, families, and the tools of assessment and intervention, and who apply that knowledge in a sensitive and skillful way. Many of the chapters in this text provide the reader with an introductory knowledge base about the field and about factors that influence development, and we have made a great effort to present the very latest information and to challenge the reader to think beyond the facts. In this revision, we also continue to emphasize the importance of gaining a broad, yet deep perspective of how children develop as they do and what can go wrong. We have remained consistent in our use of terminology (e.g., we use the termearly interventionistto refer to the many different professionals, including and most specifically the early childhood special educator, who provide early intervention services), and we have given the instructor in early childhood or special education a clear approach from which to work; that is, a knowledge-content-application approach. We believe this approach is more logical and more conducive to incremental learning by the student. The fourth edition ofYoung Children with Special Needsalso maintains a number of differences when compared to the third edition. The text has a more user-friendly appearance, with a number of instructional aids being added. Specifically, each chapter begins with an outline of the chapter-specific topics, and ends with questions and discussion points. In addition, each chapter provides a number


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...