CART

(0) items

Classic Philosophical Questions,9780131407411
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Classic Philosophical Questions

by ;
Edition:
11th
ISBN13:

9780131407411

ISBN10:
0131407414
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $68.00
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $3.94
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • CLASSIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUEST&PHIL INT00-1 PK
    CLASSIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUEST&PHIL INT00-1 PK
  • Classic Philosophical Questions
    Classic Philosophical Questions
  • Classic Philosophical Questions
    Classic Philosophical Questions
  • Classic Philosophical Questions
    Classic Philosophical Questions
  • Classic Philosophical Questions
    Classic Philosophical Questions
  • Classic Philosophical Questions Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package
    Classic Philosophical Questions Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package




Summary

First published over thirty years ago, Classic Philosophical Questions has presented decades of students with the most compelling classic and contemporary readings on the most enduring and abiding questions in philosophy. The anthology, topically arranged, uses debate and argument as vehicles to teach students the fundamentals of philosophy while also demonstrating that philosophy is a discourse spanning centuries. James A. Gould and Robert J. Mulvaney continue to provide students with interesting, intriguing essays from major philosophers in a distinctive presentation, often involving a pro/con format, to ensure that both the apparent and subtle points of argument are both meaningful and clear. Features of this new edition: bull; bull;Sections on epistemology and metaphysics introduced earlier in this edition bull;New readings from Martha Nussbaum and Martin Luther King, Jr. bull;Concise, student-friendly introductions to each philosopher and reading bull;Helpful study and reflection questions focus students' reading and improve comprehension

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART 1 Plato and the Trial of Socrates
What Is Philosophy?
Euthyphro: Defining Philosophical Terms
1(10)
The Apology, Phaedo, and Crito: The Trial, Immortality, and Death of Socrates
11(24)
PART 2 The Value of Philosophy
What Is the Value of Philosophy?
Russell: The Value of Philosophy
35(8)
PART 3 Philosophical Methodologies
What Is the Best Approach to Philosophy?
Peirce: Four Approaches to Philosophy
43(11)
Feigl: The Scientific Approach
54(11)
PART 4 Knowledge
What Is Knowledge?
Plato: Knowledge Is ``Warranted, True Belief''
65(9)
How Do We Acquire Knowledge?
Descartes: Knowledge Is Not Ultimately Sense Knowledge
74(13)
Locke: Knowledge Is Ultimately Sensed
87(14)
Kant: Knowledge Is Both Rational and Empirical
101(10)
How Is Truth Established?
Russell: Truth Is Established by Correspondence
111(7)
Bradley: Truth Is Established by Coherence
118(7)
James: Truth Is Established on Pragmatic Grounds
125(8)
Can We Know the Nature of Causal Relations?
Hume: Cause Means Regular Association
133(7)
Hume: There Are No Possible Grounds for Induction
140(11)
PART 5 Metaphysics
Of What Does Reality Consist?
Descartes: Reality Consists of Mind and Matter
151(7)
Taylor: Reality Consists of Matter
158(14)
Berkeley: Reality Consists of Ideas
172(13)
Heidegger: The Nature of Being
185(17)
Is Reality General or Particular?
Plato: Universals Are Real
202(10)
Hume: Particulars Are Real
212(6)
Do Humans Have an Identical Self?
Locke: Human Beings Have an Identical Self
218(10)
Hume: Human Beings Have No Identical Self
228(7)
PART 6 Philosophy of Religion
Can We Prove God Exists?
St. Anselm: The Ontological Argument
235(7)
St. Thomas Aquinas: The Cosmological Argument
242(6)
Paley: The Teleological Argument
248(6)
Pascal: It Is Better to Believe in God's Existence Than to Deny It
254(6)
Kierkegaard: Faith, Not Logic, Is the Basis of Belief
260(6)
Does the Idea of A Good God Exclude Evil?
Hume: A Good God Would Exclude Evil
266(8)
Hick: God Can Allow Some Evil
274(9)
PART 7 Ethics
Are Humans Free?
Holbach: Humans Are Determined
283(10)
James: Humans Are Free
293(10)
Are Ethics Relative?
Benedict: Ethics Are Relative
303(8)
Stace: Ethics Are Not Relative
311(12)
Are Humans Always Selfish?
Humans Are Always Selfish: Glaucon's Challenge to Socrates
323(4)
Rachels: Humans Are Not Always Selfish
327(11)
Which Is Basic In Ethics: Happiness or Obligation?
Aristotle: Happiness Is Living Virtuously
338(10)
Bentham: Happiness Is Seeking the Greatest Pleasure for the Greatest Number of People
348(10)
Kant: Duty Is Prior to Happiness
358(14)
Nietzsche: Happiness Is Having Power
372(8)
Sartre: Existentialist Ethics
380(10)
Tong: Feminist Ethics Are Different
390(19)
PART 8 Social Philosophy
The Abortion Issue
English: Most Abortions Are Moral
409(11)
The Pornography Issue
Ward: Should Pornography Be Censored?
420(10)
The Homosexuality Issue
Gould: Is Homosexuality Unnatural or Immoral?
430(7)
PART 9 Political Philosophy
What Is Freedom?
Dostoevski: Freedom and Authority
437(12)
Mill: Freedom Is Independence from the Majority's Tyranny
449(12)
King: Freedom and Racial Prejudice
461(11)
Light: Race and Public Policy
472(11)
Nussbaum: Women, Justice, and Freedom
483(21)
Which Government Is Best?
Hobbes: Monarchy Is Best
504(8)
Locke: Liberal Democracy Is Best
512(8)
Marx: Communism and Nonalienate Labor Is Best
520(16)
Dewey: Social Democracy Is Best
536(9)
PART 10 Aesthetics
Are Artistic Judgments Subjective?
Ducasse: Tastes Cannot Be Disputed
545(10)
Beardsley: Tastes Can Be Disputed
555(8)
What Is the Function of Art?
Aristotle: Art Purges the Emotions
563(8)
Collingwood: Magic or Amusement?
571(18)
PART 11 The Meaning of Life
What Gives Life Meaning?
Tolstoy: Faith Provides Life's Meaning
589(11)
Camus: Each Person Determines His or Her Life's Meaning
600(13)
Glossary 613

Excerpts

This eleventh edition ofClassic Philosophical Questionsis structured to set forth the fundamental questions raised in undergraduate philosophy courses. The instructor will find that this structure encourages especially lively classes. The essays, starting with Plato'sEuthyphroandApology,have been selected because they concern topics of particular interest to the beginning student in philosophy. These topics also encompass the major classical questions of concern to philosophers. None of the material is technical. Introductions and study questions precede the essays and alert students to which ideas are important to grasp. The instructor may find it valuable to organize the class around these questions. At the end of the essays, the "To Think About" questions and quotations provide material for spirited debates or for written assignments. Also at the end of the essays is a reading list that can be used for writing term papers. At the end of the book there is a glossary. The enthusiastic reception the earlier editions received reflects in part many excellent suggestions from both students and teachers. We have included some of their ideas in this eleventh edition, with new or additional material from Plato, George Berkeley, Martin Heidegger, Martin Luther King, Jr., Martha Nussbaum, and Steven Andrew Light, as well as essays relating to contemporary social issues. We sincerely appreciate the suggestions from the following reviewers, who helped to strengthen this edition: Warren Weinstein of California State University, Long Beach, and David Meeler of Winthrop University. In addition, we want to thank Martha Nussbaum and Steven Andrew Light for allowing us to include their essays in this edition. We are also grateful to Laurie Tollefsen for correcting an error in the tenth edition. Finally we want to express our gratitude for the care and support given by the Prentice-Hall team, especially our editor, Ross Miller, and our production liaison, Joanne Hakim. James A. Gould Robert J. Mulvaney


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...